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  1. #1641
    Flite is good TEAJR66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhitesma View Post
    Glad to hear it inspired you! I'm personally not a fan of sketchup, it's interface is just really non-intuitive and confusing for me, and it's really not very good at generating STL's. Partly just it's export is fairly "low definition" and uses fewer triangles in the mesh resulting in circles and curves that aren't as nice, but also the internal geometry engine that sketchup uses makes it really easy to accidentally design non-manifold parts which is a no-go for 3D printing.
    Meh, Sketchup is what I learned. It was the first free thing I found. I realized I was using the wrong tool for the job and tried to learn Fusion 360. Everything I try to design in F360 gets over constrained or experiences some other technical difficulty. I end up throwing the baby out with the bath water and going back to SU. One key to exporting STL's from SU is to orient faces before exporting.

    Had to google non-manifold. I have not had a problem. Everything I have designed for 3D printing has been in SU.

    I really do like the fillet capabilities of the CAD stuff. Eventually, I will knuckle down and learn something CAD.

    The nut traps were of little added value. I used nuts on the guide bearings for no particular reason. Maybe lock-tite was in my mind. The flywheel bearing hole is tight enough to bite the threads of the bolt and the rotation facilitates keeping the bolt tight. The bearing hole was placed out there at ~3/16" to give an ~3/8" needle travel. That makes 1/2" plenty for Z axis safe travel.
    Be safe and have fun,
    Tommy

  2. #1642
    Posted a thousand or more times jhitesma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEAJR66 View Post
    Meh, Sketchup is what I learned. It was the first free thing I found. I realized I was using the wrong tool for the job and tried to learn Fusion 360. Everything I try to design in F360 gets over constrained or experiences some other technical difficulty. I end up throwing the baby out with the bath water and going back to SU. One key to exporting STL's from SU is to orient faces before exporting.
    What's important is you found something that works for you I taught myself autocad back in the late 80's/early 90'swhen my dad brought an original IBM PC home on the weekends to work on some projects. It only had a green screen monitor - but it had autocad and he brought home the manuals so I started doing the tutorials. At some point they must have upgraded to R12 because I remember being blown away by the 3D space shuttle rendering and apparently that shipped with R12. By then he was also able to bring home a color monitor and I started really having fun.

    But - I saw limited utility in it. I wasn't really interested in CAD as a career path, and while I could draw and design all kinds of neat things I was frustrated that I couldn't turn them into physical objects. Having a 3D printer and CNC machine is literally a dream come true for me as I can finally achieve that and my interest in CAD has been strongly rekindled

    And the free CAD options available now are remarkable. Things like Blender which are great for doing more artistic 3D work, Fusion360 which is amazing with it's integrated CAM, Onshape which I've become a huge fan of, FreeCAD, Sketchup, Tinkercad, openscad....what a great time to be a tinkerer!

    Had to google non-manifold. I have not had a problem. Everything I have designed for 3D printing has been in SU.
    I designed a pergola for our yard a few years ago and it drove me crazy. I'd constantly wind up inadvertently creating faces that had no depth. Sketchup is a great resource...but I think if you come from an autodesk background some of it's conventions really hurt when you try sketchup. There are people doing amazing things with sketchup though so it definitely works for some. Though I know of a number of people who will export from sketchup (as STEP files or some other neutral format) and then import into F360 or Onshape or Tinkercad to generate their STL's.

    I really do like the fillet capabilities of the CAD stuff. Eventually, I will knuckle down and learn something CAD.
    That's the biggie that got me going on Fusion360 and Onshape. It's possible to generate fillets in openscad...but man is it a pain!

    The nut traps were of little added value. I used nuts on the guide bearings for no particular reason. Maybe lock-tite was in my mind. The flywheel bearing hole is tight enough to bite the threads of the bolt and the rotation facilitates keeping the bolt tight. The bearing hole was placed out there at ~3/16" to give an ~3/8" needle travel. That makes 1/2" plenty for Z axis safe travel.
    I'm really tempted to try drawing up a cutter that uses 220X quad motors with a thread on flywheel (you'd have to make sure the motor rotation is correct so it tightens as it runs). That should make for a very compact setup and I suspect a good number of modelers have random motors that size laying around from crashed quads And if not they probably have friends who are into quads and have random mismatched motors laying around. I'd have to do several flywheel sizes for the different X values on the motors...but could be a nice setup.

    The one issue is most of those motors are higher KV and I found using a lower KV motor on the cutter is really nice since I can run it off 12v and still get the ideal RPM in the meat of the throttle curve. With quad motors you'd have to run them on 2s or 1s voltages and still keep the throttle fairly low where you don't have as much resolution.
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  3. #1643
    Skill Collector rockyboy's Avatar
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    Those little 220x motors do seem to grow in junk boxes all by themselves

    The motor arrived in the mail (THANK YOU!!) and I'll be soldering it all up tonight - here's where I'm at on my cutter "pre-electronics"

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    Turns out the little bearings I have are 10mm, which fits the wire keeper for the flywheel, but doesn't fit on the front of the frame as a needle guide. So I carved up a quick and dirty guide from hard board. If it doesn't work, I'll just peck around in Onshape to spread out the front by 4mm and reprint the frame.
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  4. #1644
    Posted a thousand or more times jhitesma's Avatar
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    If you need help adjusting things in onshape just let me know! Does the front/back distance look good? That's one thing I was a little worried about with the printed needle holder - I think it should be ok...but...just curious.

    BTW - tip on where to find the screws for mounting the flywheel. 1806 motors use them. I have a bunch of spares since I went through quite a few emax 1806 motors and they came with two lengths of screws. Between the sizes I didn't use and the motors I've burned up I had quite a nice pile of screws for that (I should have checked if you needed some before I sent that motor!)

    Last night I started prepping the X-29 plans. That thing is a beast! Anders and Sponz did a killer job on the design and plans. I ditched the 90 degree gauge since I have a couple of triangles, and that gave me room to squish in the 64 and 70 mm EDF mounts and still fit it all on 5 sheets. First sheet estlcam said 15 minutes - not bad. 2nd and 3rd sheets came in about 20 minutes - more or less what I was expecting. 4th sheet is pretty crowded with a lot of little parts and lots of etch and score lines...just over an hour estimated cut time 5th sheet is back to 20 minutes like most others All told with time to swap sheets and maybe give the needle a rest after the 1 hour cut I'm guessing it's going to be almost 3 hours of time to cut. But can't wait to start even if I don't have an EDF or battery suitable for it yet!

    Sure am glad I've got the needle working reliably and cutting so much quicker now. With my old cutter sheet 4 would have been almost a 2 hour cut and probably would have failed halfway through - Now I'm not worried about tackling that kind of cut at all!
    Stop in and say hi in the unofficial FT IRC channel!

  5. #1645
    Posted a thousand or more times jhitesma's Avatar
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    Ha! Turns out I made a mistake on my CAM. Had the wrong tool selected for sheet four of the X-29. Switched it to the needle cutter and it's only 20 minutes like the other sheets. So glad I slept on that and gave it another look before starting to cut!
    Stop in and say hi in the unofficial FT IRC channel!

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