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Thread: Quad or plane

  1. #1

    Quad or plane

    I am on the edge right now I really want to get in to rc but I don't know if I want quad or plane

    For plane I was thinking a ft stitch or tiny trainer

    And for quad thinking versa copter 2 or maybe a store bought rtf (and not a generic one)

    Also I am on a fairly limited budget I'm only 13 any help is appreciated

  2. #2
    Depends if you want to fly "line of sight" or FPV.

    In my personal opinion flying airplanes is a lot more fun "line of sight" compared to a quad. It is very easy to get confused on the direction of the quad flying line of sight and end up crashing.

    But I also personally enjoy flying my drone FPV more than airplanes. But FPV drones can be quite expensive if you are wanting to fly it outside.

    The best thing you could do would to be buy a controller that is capable of hooking up to a computer and fly via a simulator.

    That way you can try flying airplanes and drones line of sight or a drone FPV.

    Great simulators are R/C Desk Pilot (free) for flying airplanes

    FPV Freerider ($5) for flying drones - you can fly line of sight or FPV with this software.

    If you want

  3. #3
    Old and Bold RC PILOT
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    For a limited budget I recommend that you first hang around your local RC club and see if you can get a "flight" from some generous hobbyist who has a buddy box setup and an aircraft to use it on. (It is what we do here for visitors). Then get as much advice as you can absorb and even seek help in building your own.

    Unfortunately 'copters tend to be expensive especially if they become damaged so unless you really want to learn to fly them now I would defer them until finances improve.

    As for right now some clubs will donate an old plane and even radio gear to some newbies or at least loan them but if your local is not like that then I recommend that you consider the Mini Tiny Trainer as a purely CHEAP and Durable starting plane. You might even be able to scrounge some of the electrics from the locals but if not then the cheap bits from your preferred internet supplier would suffice.

    Plugging into your local will save you time, money, and a lot of discouragement.

    Have fun! Fly high and often!
    Last edited by Hai-Lee; 02-16-2017 at 06:57 PM.

  4. #4
    Banned for Monkey Mocking AkimboGlueGuns's Avatar
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    If you want to get started for cheap then planes are the way to go. You can build/buy a plane MUCH cheaper then it cost to buy/build a quad, especially with FPV gear.

    Also, Ditto on what Bromego said. LOS with planes is a lot more fun with planes than it is with quads.
    "It'll fly... Probably"

    Keegan Sponholz

    Hangar: Constantly changing
    Development: Christen Eagle II, Grumman Turbo Ag Cat, Intruder (60" and 28"), Wittman 1934 Chief Oshkosh

  5. #5
    Kite Eating Tree Trimmer cranialrectosis's Avatar
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    If space is limited a quad most often uses less space than a fixed wing.

    Flight time with fixed wing is usually longer than a multi-rotor.

    Foamies are CHEAP and simple to build and repair. Multi-rotors are more complicated with more sophisticated electronics and more expensive components, but you can often do more with them such as GPS hold and RTH.

    You need to learn to fly a quad LOS in acro mode to tune it (unless you run something like dRonin with autotune). This takes most folks 2-3 weeks to 'get'. Once I got it, I found LOS 4 channel fixed wing to be simple.

    Quads burn through props like smokers through cigarettes. The better you get, the MORE props you break with a racer.

    No matter which way you go, the radio you buy will define your ability to control it. Your radio and your charger will impact every model you own; same with FPV goggles. Choose such components with care.

    Welcome to FliteTest.
    Freiheit schöner götterfunken tochter aus elysium!

  6. #6
    Fly Angry PsyBorg's Avatar
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    I don't know. I put lights on the front and back of my Versacopter and had no problems flying LOS at the same range I currently fly FPV. So long as you have the muscle memory and can see change in movement you can adjust just as easy with a quad as long as you focus on the motion and not the physical air frame.

    BILLS LAW: Bills Law specifically states that it covers ANYTHING that Murphy may have forgot, omitted, or plain didn't know in the first place. There fore if it can happen it WILL happen to ME.

    Psyborg FPV You Tube channel.. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC88...L6-KC9qTa2LgVA

  7. #7

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    Try them both. I learned the hard expensive way. I chose to buy so called trainer RTF planes (plural meaning more than 1) and ended up crashing them very quickly. Found flight test and still tried building and flying with little to no skill. Had some slight success and then the light bulb went off. "Why don't I do as everyone suggested and buy a simulator?" Ding ding ding. What a novel idea. Well as I learned on the trainer I became a better rc pilot. So now I can fly ok without crashing so much. I suggest you get a sim and maybe a trainer like the Hobby Zone Champ. Good Luck.
    If you don't crash you aren't trying hard enough!!!

  8. #8
    Buy a controller that can connect to a pc and try simulators.

    Simply put, yes you can get inexpensive quads and fly close proximity, but it will feel more like you're playing with a toy than a hobby.

    You buy an airplane, the cost can be fairly inexpensive (under $100 for everything) and now you can fly whole fields.

    Real Drones can be fun but to get real ones cost $250-300+, and honestly are very costly when they break and have a HUGE HUGE learning curve.

    Plans you more or less plug a battery, toss it in the air, go fly, repeat.

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