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  1. #11
    Such a pity your in USA! I would buy the radio in a heart beat...
    God bless you'se.

  2. #12
    I was reading this thread, just going "Why does Thunder Tiger sound familiar?"
    Turns out my dad has a 1/8 scale nitro truggy, the Thunder Tiger ST-1, known to me as the TTST-1. lol.
    "Fold the parts up till it looks like a plane, glue it so it stays that shape, screw in a motor and some electronics and toss it in the air."
    -Aviator08

    (I take no credit for the above quotes in my signature. I simply thought they were clever.)

  3. #13
    The plane had wire main landing gear that was rusty. It also had 2-1/4” foam wheels which were bad and seemed too small. I’m a newbie and this plane will truly be a trainer so I want strong landing gear. I added some support to the fuselage interior (a piece of wood yard stick) where the main landing gear mounts. I installed a new Carl Goldberg glass fiber landing gear with new 3” Dubro Super Lite wheels. I hope this is not too much additional weight and is not overkill.

    Old main landing gear

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    New main landing gear

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  4. #14
    The wire gear is actually quite resilient. There's a reason almost all of the trainers have wire gear. That wire can take a lot of pounding before it fails, and it absorbs energy with it its ability to flex. Make sure your new gear is not too tall. On a tricycle gear setup, you need to have the nose a skosh high, one for angle of attack, and also to keep your prop out of terra firma. The glass gear will probably be fine, but don't be surprised if you rip the bottom of the fuse out with a rough landing. The wire gear has more flex, where the fiberglass gear is quite rigid, and will transfer more energy to the fuselage.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by roversgonemad View Post
    The wire gear is actually quite resilient. There's a reason almost all of the trainers have wire gear. That wire can take a lot of pounding before it fails, and it absorbs energy with it its ability to flex. Make sure your new gear is not too tall. On a tricycle gear setup, you need to have the nose a skosh high, one for angle of attack, and also to keep your prop out of terra firma. The glass gear will probably be fine, but don't be surprised if you rip the bottom of the fuse out with a rough landing. The wire gear has more flex, where the fiberglass gear is quite rigid, and will transfer more energy to the fuselage.
    The new gear has almost the same angles and dimensions as the wire gear that was removed. The plane may sit slightly higher with the larger diameter wheels. I also plan on also putting a 3" wheel in the nose gear so it should be a wash. Thanks for the advice. Lesson learned...bigger and stronger is not always better.

  6. #16
    A thousand pints of lite. Joker 53150's Avatar
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    The stock landing gear wires are an old-school method which works well, as long as the wood doesn't get too beat up. The Kadet Senior I'm re-building uses that style, and I'll probably do a little surgery to clean it up a bit. Both styles work, and I like the look of your new gear better. You may want to use bigger washers on the bolts to spread the load out a bit.
    Joker

    Balsa dust is a wonderful thing, make some today!

  7. #17
    I have never used film covering so my intention was to do as little covering on this project as possible. Unfortunately, this project will require more covering work than I expected. The wing has holes at the ribs on both sides, top and bottom. I don’t want to take the time and effort to remove all the covering and redo the entire wing. I decided to remove the covering around the wing ribs to the sheeting and just iron on large patches. I figured the sheeting would give me a nice smooth flat surface to iron on the patches. Hopefully I won’t have any problems with the new film sticking to the existing covering.

    Top of wing before removing covering
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    Bottom of wing before removing covering
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    Wing with covering removed
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  8. #18
    A thousand pints of lite. Joker 53150's Avatar
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    Are you going to try and blend in with the existing colors, or simply do a large single-color patch? The new covering will probably stick to the old stuff, but be extra careful on the leading edge of that new covering, as any spot not secure will open like a flap allowing wind in. Once that wind starts pushing into the wing cavity it's like more and more of it will come lose.

    I think you said this was your first try with covering, so my suggestion is to simply go for something that works, with little focus on making it look good. Get it patched and airworthy, followed by another victory of seeing it in the air. If you're happy with how it flies you can always go back later on and make it pretty.
    Joker

    Balsa dust is a wonderful thing, make some today!

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Joker 53150 View Post
    Are you going to try and blend in with the existing colors, or simply do a large single-color patch? The new covering will probably stick to the old stuff, but be extra careful on the leading edge of that new covering, as any spot not secure will open like a flap allowing wind in. Once that wind starts pushing into the wing cavity it's like more and more of it will come lose.

    I think you said this was your first try with covering, so my suggestion is to simply go for something that works, with little focus on making it look good. Get it patched and airworthy, followed by another victory of seeing it in the air. If you're happy with how it flies you can always go back later on and make it pretty.
    Yep, I agree with you. My goal is to get this plane airworthy by spending as little time and money as possible...and gaining some building experience in the process. I don't care about exactly matching the existing graphics. I plan on just doing two red patches on the top and two white patches on the bottom. I think that will look good enough.

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