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Thread: Soldering Irons

  1. #11
    Obsession, not hobby TazRC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    294
    FWIW: Investing in a good soldering iron "station" will pay for itself in the long run. Temp control will help with being able to solder large gauge battery wire and connectors yet still work with tiny pads, like on a small flight controller, without lifting the pad or measling or delaminating the board. Look for "rapid temperature recovery" and read as many reviews as you can.
    On the ol' Interweb: tazrc.com

  2. #12
    slembcke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    St. Paul
    Posts
    9
    I've been really happy with this iron in my field repair kit:
    https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...prds=rstart:10

    I got it from a Home Depot for like $20 when I needed to make a quick repair once. It's powered by a 9v 2a power supply, so I made an adapter to run it off a 2S battery. It works great! Heats up in like 30 seconds, and draws a little under 1.5a, so it should run a long time off a decent sized battery. It is cheaply made, and doesn't handle high gauge wire great, but I've found it to be invaluable. It has a replaceable tip, bit I can't find anywhere that stocks them.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    31
    Ended up going with the Circuit Specialists one that Craftydan suggested. Picking it up from the campus mailbox today, and I'll let you all know how it turned out. Thanks again Craftydan and everyone else that replied!
    "For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return."

    -Leonardo da Vinci

  4. #14
    Moderator Balu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Münster, Germany
    Posts
    2,948
    Another option might be to look for DIY stations. I just got a "Maiskolben" (which is I a word play between the German "Lötkolben" (soldering iron) and "Maiskolben" (corn on the cob) I think). It was featured in Germans Make magazine and is open source. It uses active Weller tips (fast heating, temperature measurement in the tip, etc.) that can easily be changed and have a really good reputation too.

    It can also be powered with a 3S LiPo which (besides the open source concept) is one of the main reasons I got it in addition to my other semi-professional station. Note how it shows each LiPo cell in this video:



    The only problem is if you get a kit, you won't be able to build it, because you don't have the tool to do so .

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Sandy Eggo, CA
    Posts
    104
    I know I TRIED to make do with a cheap soldering iron from Harbor Freight. I was able to use it exactly twice before it stopped working. I got lucky and Fry's Electronics had a sale on the Hakko FX-888D ($70, instead of $100) and I've had success ever since. I won't say it's the end all be all soldering solution, but it works pretty darned good for soldering XT-60 connectors and bullet connectors on ESCs!!!
    Hangar:

    Blade Conspiracy 220, Inductrix Pro, Blade Glimpse, FT Sea Duck

    Workbench:

    FT Duster

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