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  1. #31
    Ray K Ray K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfd View Post
    according to wiki, graupner went bankrupt in 2012, and in 2014 they were bought out by a south korean manufacturing company. be interesting to know where that radio gear is made these dayze.
    In trying to become familiar with the MZ-12 & company, I've read that the gear is mostly being made in Korea. That doesn't bother me so long as they hang with the original designers' parameters. The Pacific Rim Asian countries have a pretty fair track record in the manufacture of electronic equipment these days. They had their teething problems when they took that road, but generally produce some pretty good stuff, now. I'll trust them until they give me reason not to.

  2. #32
    AMA 51668 rfd's Avatar
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    i totally agree with ya, ray. the asians can do some remarkably stellar work that combines function, quality and price point - as they have most notably in the fretted instrument industry. though i have a gaggle of USA built radio gear, my current go-to tx units are a pair of "lowly" chinese jumpers.

  3. #33
    Ray K Ray K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfd View Post
    "Which Transmitter You Should Buy..." IMHO the title of this thread and it's content is going in the wrong direction IF you expect its audience to be dead aimed at the newbie. Unless yer defining "newbie" as other than a person totally new to r/c aircraft.
    That would be me, and I am totally new to R/C. I've been tinkering with a little RTF T-28 from Horizon, but beyond that, absolutely nothing. Still haven't actually flown the thing. I was trained by USAF to be a test pilot and have followed the normal routine for a new plane. Lots of taxi tests until you feel comfortable. Close as I've come to flight is a few crow-hops. Guess that sounds silly to an experienced r/c guy, but it kept me alive in the service. At Edwards they handed me the books and "keys" to a single-seat F-104 and told me to learn to fly it. Eventually I did and loved the little plane. By far the most fun plane I ever flew, but there were a lot of high-speed taxis and crow-hops first. What I'm doing is trying to train my thumbs to the sticks. The plane is very touchy to control inputs.

  4. #34
    Ray K Ray K's Avatar
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by JimCR120 View Post
    Thanks for contributing. I've heard nothing but good about the Graupner line of equipment. Odd that it hasn't taken off more. Perhaps some insight can make a difference.

    On civilian life... I know it's different on the outside. I miss my time in the Navy too but even if I could be back in now it's a different time with a different set of rules to play by. Old dogs can be taught new tricks but we often don't like it.
    Man, you are so right about the changes to the service. Like they say, "It's not your grandpa's Air Force" anymore. They'd most likely give me a bad conduct discharge these days. After I got a little rank, I wasn't known for taking a load of BS.

    Like I say, I've been reading about Graupner a lot, and what they've done, at least on the surface, is create a radio with a lot of capabilities. One example, there's no more 1=throttle, 2=ailerons, etc. Put 'em where you want them, how you want them. I still haven't gotten my radio, by the way. USPS tracking now says it's "delayed" somewhere on its way to Houston. The postal gods seem to be upset with me. Oh, well. Join the club. Oh, and Squid, thanks for YOUR service. I've always thought the Navy was more intense than the Air Force. I know I sure wouldn't have wanted to land on one of those postage stamps you guys call carriers!

  5. #35
    AMA 51668 rfd's Avatar
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    my dad crew chiefed for at-6 texans at randolph field, texas, during ww2, and was a civilian pilot after the war. in the late 70's he built an all aluminum high wing plane w/removable wings. wish i could remember the aircraft's name. the only full scale flying i did was taking sailplane lessons down in south carolina. i'll stick with r/c models

    anyhoo, after reading up on the graupner m-12, i think it'll be a good radio for starting out, and has plenty of features if need be. there are two main ways to approach the tx sticks - thumbs or thumbs/forefingers, i prefer the later. as to a good start-out fixed wing aircraft, i think it's hard to beat a good 3ch ol' timer - slow, stable, forgiving, fun. FT ol' fogey is a goodie.

  6. #36
    AMA 51668 rfd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray K View Post
    .... One example, there's no more 1=throttle, 2=ailerons, etc. Put 'em where you want them, how you want them....
    i prefer mode 4 - throttle/aileron on the left, elevator/rudder on the right (yeah, i'm right handed). i mostly fly 3ch, and i like the feel of pitch and yaw with one stick, but i switch off to mode 2 for an aileron craft.

  7. #37
    Ray K Ray K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfd View Post
    i prefer mode 4 - throttle/aileron on the left, elevator/rudder on the right (yeah, i'm right handed). i mostly fly 3ch, and i like the feel of pitch and yaw with one stick, but i switch off to mode 2 for an aileron craft.
    After 56 years as a full-scale pilot, I prefer throttle and rudder on the left, elevators & ailerons on the right. That's as close as I can get to the real deal (rudder on your feet). And the three planes I have now, the T-28, FT Simple Scout and Peter's Big Guinea all have ailerons, what I'm used to. Even the little experimental I fly is stick right, throttle left and rudder on feet. I'm not at all sure I'd be comfortable with no ailerons. Here's a pic of my "baby fighter". All metal, fully aerobatic.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #38
    Site Moderator JimCR120's Avatar
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    Detachable wings? For space I assume. NOw I have quesstions about removing, replacing, rigging, strength, fuel. Maybe you wouldn't mind sharing?

    ***However, just note that these posts will eventually be deleted to keep the thread concise and easier to focus on the data. If you (or anyone) wants to post something to be preserved beyond this thread another thread can be started. If you are fine with the posts getting deleted in time then feel free. I would like to know about your full scale bird here.
    Truths in life:
    1) Everything that happens happens for a reason. Luck does not exist.
    2) In this existence we are part of the problem or part of the solution. The choice is ours.
    3) We aren't defined by our circumstances but by our reactions to them. Crisis reveals character.

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