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36" Northern Pike - 3D Printed Cuda Clone (It Flies & STL's are Posted!)

chris398mx

Well-known member
I have read all that, but will look over it again. I keep getting an error message when I try to import your Cura profile. I'll attach a pic. If it helps any I'm running an Ender 3 on Cura 4.4.1. Ignore the "thinwall plane" profile. I've taken your settings you posted on the thingiverse page and for the most part copied them straight over to Cura. Is your Cura profile set to .25 layer height? I think that may be part of the problem. If you could set it to .2 and post the file here I'd be greatful! View attachment 155271
Here is a video about how to fix the error message you are getting.

I couldn't get the cura profile to see the thin wall items either so here is what i did. I am using 4.2.1 and haven't updated for fear of it not working again.
I installed a Prusa MK2 printer into cura and used localfiend's profile for that printer, but to make that work, i had to change the settings for the printer back to my ender 3 for build plate and height, plus the settings for the print head. ( i just copied them from the ender 3 settings already in cura) then Ialso had to change some of the print settings for retraction and other ender 3 specific items to get good prints.

If you go this route and want my profile I built up, i can send it to you. I know this sounds like a lot, but it was't that bad. This was the only way I could get Cura to see the inner structures of the wings and print them.

Good luck
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
Some of the issues importing other profiles is the actual names Cura has in there for default profiles, "standard versus normal quality" , fine versus super quality" , they changed the names with the newer versions and when you go to import the file things don't mesh.

One thing I found a couple times where inner structure wouldn't show up I would switch to draft quality then slice again and then back to the fine quality, slice again and it would then be ok.
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
Cura really sucks lol. For a bit there, the new version was working with older profiles, and then it stopped again.

I've uploaded a PETG thinwall profile for cura 4.4 to the thingiverse downloads section. Give that a try. If you're using PLA, you pretty much just need to adjust temperatures and retraction distance to suit your printer to get a baseline.
 

whackflyer

Well-known member
Cura really sucks lol. For a bit there, the new version was working with older profiles, and then it stopped again.

I've uploaded a PETG thinwall profile for cura 4.4 to the thingiverse downloads section. Give that a try. If you're using PLA, you pretty much just need to adjust temperatures and retraction distance to suit your printer to get a baseline.
I wish I had 150$ to buy Simplify3d but I don't. I tried importing your new profile and it still gave me the same error message. I guess now I'll try @chris398mx's idea.
 

whackflyer

Well-known member
Here is a video about how to fix the error message you are getting.

I couldn't get the cura profile to see the thin wall items either so here is what i did. I am using 4.2.1 and haven't updated for fear of it not working again.
I installed a Prusa MK2 printer into cura and used localfiend's profile for that printer, but to make that work, i had to change the settings for the printer back to my ender 3 for build plate and height, plus the settings for the print head. ( i just copied them from the ender 3 settings already in cura) then Ialso had to change some of the print settings for retraction and other ender 3 specific items to get good prints.

If you go this route and want my profile I built up, i can send it to you. I know this sounds like a lot, but it was't that bad. This was the only way I could get Cura to see the inner structures of the wings and print them.

Good luck
Did you also have to change the start and end g-codes?
 

whackflyer

Well-known member
Ok, so I just added a Prusa i3 MK2 to my printers in Cura and transfered my print head settings and start and end g-code over from the ender 3. Then I tried importing @localfiend new cura 4.4 profile and it worked. I changed my layer height to .2 since that's what my printer does best. I changed the heat and retraction settings. I've got a part for the pike sliced and I'm going to start the print in lunch hour. Wish me the best!
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
Ok, so I just added a Prusa i3 MK2 to my printers in Cura and transfered my print head settings and start and end g-code over from the ender 3. Then I tried importing @localfiend new cura 4.4 profile and it worked. I changed my layer height to .2 since that's what my printer does best. I changed the heat and retraction settings. I've got a part for the pike sliced and I'm going to start the print in lunch hour. Wish me the best!
You can do .2 layer heights. Just be aware that it's heavier and takes longer to print. I'd only change this up if your printer really can't handle the difference. That's generally only a problem if your hardware has issues.
 

whackflyer

Well-known member
Good news! I got it working. Changed my ender 3 settings over to a prusa mk2, then imported @localfiend new cura 4.4 profile. I had some problems with oozing and stringing, so I had to goof with retraction settings for a while, but I just started a fuselage piece and it appears to be doing great!
 
@localfiend
I am brand new to 3D printing and have my first printer ordered (Anycubic i3 Mega). I have read through this thread and there is a ton of information to process. I will study your notes more and the information in your youtube videos and on thingiverse.

I would at least like to have the proper materials on hand so that once I get my printer setup and my feet wet, that I can attempt to complete a 3D plane. I have no CAD skills, but do have a background in mechanical drawing and have been building scratch builds from plans since the 80's. I know this thread is a couple years old but in the first few pages you showed some examples of how you approach the design process. I will read each post again in greater detail to try to understand better.

I want to be successful and am willing to put in the effort to learn. What software should I consider using? What filaments will I want to have on hand.

Projects like this are pretty exciting to think about being able to make at home.
 
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localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
@localfiend
I want to be successful and am willing to put in the effort to learn. What software should I consider using? What filaments will I want to have on hand.

Projects like this are pretty exciting to think about being able to make at home.
I didn't have any experience with 3D CAD when I started so it's all doable even without training if you put in the effort.

Fusion 360 is what I use, and still reccomend. It's free for hobby use, and has just gotten better and better over time. Solidworks or any other large mainstream parametric 3D CAD program should also work if you have access. A good slicer is also a must. I strongly recommend Simplify3d. It's not free, but that really shows in the features it has available that directly affect thin wall prints.

You will probably want to convert your printer to a direct drive system. Trying to design planes with a Bowden style printer is probably gonna cause a lot of hair pulling. I'm not saying Bowden can't work, just that tuning is far more complex, and a lot more can go wrong. Also, in the end, it's quite likely that even tuned to the best the printer can handle, the results will not be as good. Not sure about the anycubic, but kitsch to cover are pretty cheap for most printers at the moment.

As far as filaments go, PLA is the easiest to design for, but it has it's drawbacks. Mainly the melting in high temps, or when exposed to lots of sun in the summertime.

ABS and ASA can alleviate that particular problem, but both warp badly. Carbon filled variants are much better in that regard, they just require a hardened nozzle.

PETG doesn't really warp much, and can stand a lot more heat than PLA. It, along with ABS, and ASA are also more flexible. That can make the plane a bit more durable, but you have to design the plane to be stiff enough. This means more structure, and possibly carbon.

Right now, LW-PLA from colorfab is the most interesting new option I've come across. It actively foams as you print depending on the nozzle temperature. It's half the weight of all the others above, and is far more durable, if a lot more flexible. Sadly, it has the same temperature pitfalls as regular PLA. I'm really hoping it's a sign of things to come. A foaming ABS, PETG, polycarbonate, or polystyrene would be awesome for printed aircraft.

I'm hoping to test fly a brand new LW-PLA design tomorrow. I took full advantage of the benefits it gives and designed something a little crazy.

Mk IV Revenant 1.png

Mk IV Revenant 2.png
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Mk IV Revenant 4.png
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I didn't have any experience with 3D CAD when I started so it's all doable even without training if you put in the effort.

Fusion 360 is what I use, and still reccomend. It's free for hobby use, and has just gotten better and better over time. Solidworks or any other large mainstream parametric 3D CAD program should also work if you have access. A good slicer is also a must. I strongly recommend Simplify3d. It's not free, but that really shows in the features it has available that directly affect thin wall prints.

You will probably want to convert your printer to a direct drive system. Trying to design planes with a Bowden style printer is probably gonna cause a lot of hair pulling. I'm not saying Bowden can't work, just that tuning is far more complex, and a lot more can go wrong. Also, in the end, it's quite likely that even tuned to the best the printer can handle, the results will not be as good. Not sure about the anycubic, but kitsch to cover are pretty cheap for most printers at the moment.

As far as filaments go, PLA is the easiest to design for, but it has it's drawbacks. Mainly the melting in high temps, or when exposed to lots of sun in the summertime.

ABS and ASA can alleviate that particular problem, but both warp badly. Carbon filled variants are much better in that regard, they just require a hardened nozzle.

PETG doesn't really warp much, and can stand a lot more heat than PLA. It, along with ABS, and ASA are also more flexible. That can make the plane a bit more durable, but you have to design the plane to be stiff enough. This means more structure, and possibly carbon.

Right now, LW-PLA from colorfab is the most interesting new option I've come across. It actively foams as you print depending on the nozzle temperature. It's half the weight of all the others above, and is far more durable, if a lot more flexible. Sadly, it has the same temperature pitfalls as regular PLA. I'm really hoping it's a sign of things to come. A foaming ABS, PETG, polycarbonate, or polystyrene would be awesome for printed aircraft.

I'm hoping to test fly a brand new LW-PLA design tomorrow. I took full advantage of the benefits it gives and designed something a little crazy.

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@localfiend Thanks for the information. I had downloaded Fusion360 yesterday and have begun fiddling around with it. I will just work my way through the tutorials and learn as I go. I have a .jpg of a Mooney 21 plan from OZ and I have learned how to import it as a canvas and begin tracing it into a CAD file. Lots of reading, lots of youtube, and LOTS of undo. My greatest hurdle at this point is that I don't know the terminology to be able to search for the answer and while some things are intuitive, others are not.

As I progress with my learning I will look more into upgrades. Again, I don't know enough to even begin to have a conversation. I think I understand what a slicer does, but no understanding of how it works or why one would be better than another. I am pretty good at following instructions and I will try to simply replicate what others have already done and go from there. I'm not opposed to purchasing software once I understand why.

Regarding a direct drive upgrade, I did purchase the Mega S upgrade with my printer. I'm not sure why I did other than it seemed inexpensive to just get it at the same time. I know that is an upgraded extruder to be able to handle the flexible filament (TPU?) but I believe it is still a Bowden type. As before, I don't know enough yet. But I will get google involved and continue to read. I purchased this printer somewhat on a whim, with very little understanding of the differences. Possibly a little premature, uneducated decision on my part however one of my biggest character flaws is I tend to research things to death, suffer from analysis paralysis, and end up confused and doing nothing but research. I decided this time to pick something and buy it. So that's what I did. My logic being that I will learn as I go and that the cost involved for the most part is trivial (<200$) and not the end of the world if it was a bad decision. I didn't have a specific project in mind other than wanting to learn about the technology and make some simple parts like control horns and such. As I started reading more I came across the threads like this one and the idea of printing an entire plane was fascinating. Maybe over my head, but this will give me something to work towards, as I learn the limitations of the equipment I will adapt as I go. If I need to purchase some upgrades I am open to that. A nudge in the right direction to compare direct drive extruders vs bowden and how I might approach upgrading parts if necessary is always appreciated.

Whether I advance to the level of being able to design my own plane is irrelevant. There is so much to learn and it will keep my brain busy.

The plane you just posted is spectacular. I look forward to reading more about it.

Thanks again for sharing so much information.

ETA: Is this the type of upgrade you are referring to?
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3561086
 
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Tench745

Well-known member
I didn't have any experience with 3D CAD when I started so it's all doable even without training if you put in the effort.

Fusion 360 is what I use, and still reccomend. It's free for hobby use, and has just gotten better and better over time. Solidworks or any other large mainstream parametric 3D CAD program should also work if you have access. A good slicer is also a must. I strongly recommend Simplify3d. It's not free, but that really shows in the features it has available that directly affect thin wall prints.

You will probably want to convert your printer to a direct drive system. Trying to design planes with a Bowden style printer is probably gonna cause a lot of hair pulling. I'm not saying Bowden can't work, just that tuning is far more complex, and a lot more can go wrong. Also, in the end, it's quite likely that even tuned to the best the printer can handle, the results will not be as good. Not sure about the anycubic, but kitsch to cover are pretty cheap for most printers at the moment.

As far as filaments go, PLA is the easiest to design for, but it has it's drawbacks. Mainly the melting in high temps, or when exposed to lots of sun in the summertime.

ABS and ASA can alleviate that particular problem, but both warp badly. Carbon filled variants are much better in that regard, they just require a hardened nozzle.

PETG doesn't really warp much, and can stand a lot more heat than PLA. It, along with ABS, and ASA are also more flexible. That can make the plane a bit more durable, but you have to design the plane to be stiff enough. This means more structure, and possibly carbon.

Right now, LW-PLA from colorfab is the most interesting new option I've come across. It actively foams as you print depending on the nozzle temperature. It's half the weight of all the others above, and is far more durable, if a lot more flexible. Sadly, it has the same temperature pitfalls as regular PLA. I'm really hoping it's a sign of things to come. A foaming ABS, PETG, polycarbonate, or polystyrene would be awesome for printed aircraft.

I'm hoping to test fly a brand new LW-PLA design tomorrow. I took full advantage of the benefits it gives and designed something a little crazy.

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Woah.
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
I didn't have any experience with 3D CAD when I started so it's all doable even without training if you put in the effort.

Fusion 360 is what I use, and still reccomend. It's free for hobby use, and has just gotten better and better over time. Solidworks or any other large mainstream parametric 3D CAD program should also work if you have access. A good slicer is also a must. I strongly recommend Simplify3d. It's not free, but that really shows in the features it has available that directly affect thin wall prints.

You will probably want to convert your printer to a direct drive system. Trying to design planes with a Bowden style printer is probably gonna cause a lot of hair pulling. I'm not saying Bowden can't work, just that tuning is far more complex, and a lot more can go wrong. Also, in the end, it's quite likely that even tuned to the best the printer can handle, the results will not be as good. Not sure about the anycubic, but kitsch to cover are pretty cheap for most printers at the moment.

As far as filaments go, PLA is the easiest to design for, but it has it's drawbacks. Mainly the melting in high temps, or when exposed to lots of sun in the summertime.

ABS and ASA can alleviate that particular problem, but both warp badly. Carbon filled variants are much better in that regard, they just require a hardened nozzle.

PETG doesn't really warp much, and can stand a lot more heat than PLA. It, along with ABS, and ASA are also more flexible. That can make the plane a bit more durable, but you have to design the plane to be stiff enough. This means more structure, and possibly carbon.

Right now, LW-PLA from colorfab is the most interesting new option I've come across. It actively foams as you print depending on the nozzle temperature. It's half the weight of all the others above, and is far more durable, if a lot more flexible. Sadly, it has the same temperature pitfalls as regular PLA. I'm really hoping it's a sign of things to come. A foaming ABS, PETG, polycarbonate, or polystyrene would be awesome for printed aircraft.

I'm hoping to test fly a brand new LW-PLA design tomorrow. I took full advantage of the benefits it gives and designed something a little crazy.

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That looks really cool.
 

whackflyer

Well-known member
@localfiend that is a sweet plane! Back to the Pike, is there any way to stop the ribs from showing through the skin? It prints fine now that I got things figured out but where a rib is then there is a small rib on the outside of the skin. Anyone have a solution?
 

localfiend

I like 3D printers...
Mentor
@localfiend that is a sweet plane! Back to the Pike, is there any way to stop the ribs from showing through the skin? It prints fine now that I got things figured out but where a rib is then there is a small rib on the outside of the skin. Anyone have a solution?
If your printer is in good working order, the outer surface should be smooth. Got any pictures of what it's doing? Also, what type of filament is it?
 

whackflyer

Well-known member
It's Hatchbox black PLA. It's not a big deal and totally will be fine, it's just about a .1 mm kindof ridge directly across the wall from a rib. I'd have to check to make sure, but I don't think it's happening on all the ribs. The prints look great otherwise.