• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

A Bi-Wing B-1B It's Huge!

#1
Well, I have created a new bi-wing airplane, it's not the usual style of bi-wing which goes over the plane, but each wing has a wing on top of each other, it is a tad heavy. the body is two sheets of card stock paper glued then taped, the tail are two edges of disposable cereal bowls glued together and wired onto the back of the body. The wood to attach the two wings are tooth picks, then wired to the body. Now, you can do this with different material you use, but should look like what I have in the photo with the first wing attached. Feel free to make it into a RC Plane if you wish or a gas RC plane.
 

Attachments

#2
WIN_20180722_17_12_45_Pro.jpg

Kind of looks like a X Wing, but not as much flex, it is so hard to try to tighten that double wing so it does not fold onto each other. Anyway, if someone wants to attempt this design as a RC Plane, go right ahead. I hope my ideas you find helpful and neat. God bless.
 
#3
Both wings are on, it looks like a Bi-wing B-1 Bomber, so if you did it out of foam board properly, and did the electronic doors underneath to drop paint packets, plus at least three engines on each wing and a set of wheels on the end of wings to help keep it from dragging like the normal B-1. If you did it out of other material to put gas engines on it, would be awesome too. Again, went with a flat tail. This thing has a great CG and if in the wind of a fan, it glides well.
 

Attachments

#4
If you can take the top wings that go onto the normal mono-wings and make them flex like the current Military Jet Planes, when they idle and normal fly a holding pattern, they are straight, but when they need to get to a position fast, they flex them back to make them go supersonic, if you can design where the top wing does that in flight, that be so awesome, have a RC Supersonic Bi-Wing B-1-B.
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#6
Hey! I can't help but notice that you've been posting a lot here lately, and that's great! We are very happy that you have joined us on the forum. A struggle I am having, however, is that I don't know how to comment on threads like this, and I want to interact/be helpful as much as I can. Maybe you could help me (and hopefully others) by explaining exactly how we can help you. You've been posting all kinds of designs and they are a lot different than what we are used to seeing on the forum, so I for one don't really quite know how to approach them. Could you help us out?
 
#7
Well, I just been posting designs and trying to explain how I made them, so others can build them and make them fly, because I can't afford the RC electronics, so I thought to see if others would want to make them. @Chuppster
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#8
Well, I just been posting designs and trying to explain how I made them, so others can build them and make them fly, because I can't afford the RC electronics, so I thought to see if others would want to make them. @Chuppster
Thanks for the reply!

I understand that getting into the hobby can be a bit pricey, but would you mind if I suggest something? I believe it's the most affordable way to get airborne. Most of us here on the forum use foamboard to make at least some of our airplanes. This stuff can be found at some Walmarts for $0.88/sheet or a Dollar General/Dollar Tree for $1/sheet. Then, if you have access to a printer, you can download and print plans for a chuck glider such as the FT Sparrow. You may need to buy a hot glue gun and a knife, but if you have one lying around then you should be all set with that already. This is a very affordable way to learn the basics of building aircraft ($3 in materials) and you can fly them too!

The reason I suggest this is because foamboard gives you a lot of flexibility in your own designs. It's so lightweight that you just have to get the CG right and it'll fly. You can, of course, use toilet paper rolls, cardboard boxes, and paper in your designs, but as the main materials it makes things challenging as their strength/weigh ratio and lack of rigidity make their usability in design niche.

I am in no way trying to discourage you from doing what you're doing, but I am hopeful that you could find building with foam fun, and it's easy enough my little sisters could do it (with me helping, of course. 10 year old with an exacto can be dangerous). And of course, we are here if you have any questions.
 
#9
I've been using card stock paper, glue, paper clips, and gorilla tape, will be looking for foam board, hoping the dollar store here or our super walmart will have it, we've got a glue gun, but the glue gets too hot for foam, when we had foam a few years back, it melted it.
 

Chuppster

Well-known member
#10
I've been using card stock paper, glue, paper clips, and gorilla tape, will be looking for foam board, hoping the dollar store here or our super walmart will have it, we've got a glue gun, but the glue gets too hot for foam, when we had foam a few years back, it melted it.
With foamboard the glue melts the foam a little bit, but because paper doesn't melt hot glue works pretty well.
 
#11
good. Anyway, I started a new build last night from a paper towel card board roll and a piece I cut out for this huge project and it has a shape of a fighter plane, I ask in the new article, how to either make a RAF Hurricane or a P-40 Tiger.