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A few questions...

Piotrsko

Master member
#21
The other thing to know about military flying is that just being an officer doesn't make it possible to fly, you need to be in an active flying specialty which sometimes includes being shot at (maybe not for tankers.[tankers are really hard to sign up for, competition is fierce, multi engined jet ticket]) and some odd physical requirements like no filled cavities for one.
Does the army still use enlisted for the chopper pilots?

Trying to not be Mr negative, but Btdt, had to move along.
 
#22
I'm very much aware of the difficulty of getting a pilot slot. Really, I'm a bit surprised that tankers have fierce competition! The whole getting shot at bit seems to be somewhat inherent in the military flying world, so I'm not surprised. From what I've seen, the cavity thing only applies to Coast Guard pilots. Regardless, that's something that'll take more research. There's a waiver process, so that's a pathway that remains open. As things stand right now, my plan is this: if I wind up flying in the Air Guard, then I'll likely pursue the helo track to fly HH-60Gs, but possibly the fixed-wing track if I discover that I hate helos. If I go to the Navy/Marines, then I'll go for fixed-wing. If I go to the Coast Guard, probably rotary. That cavity thing, as I said, does require more research. From a cursory glance at the first page of Google results, I can see how it sort of makes sense, and barodontalgia is something I dearly wish to avoid. However, as long as the filling is done properly and of good quality, I would imagine it's fine. Off to do some research!
 

Piotrsko

Master member
#23
Crowns also, AND eons ago the only fix for the cavities was tooth removal, since the only qualified dentists were military and you couldn't pay to get it done. Funny, it didn't matter when you were a B52 tail gunner enlisted puke, or service tech operating the armpit ordinance.

Tankers are commercial planes with fuel tanks instead of most of the seats, so you come out with a rating and PIC time and just need rating time in the airlines current plane; the holy grail so to speak.

Go find a helo training school and do a intro flight. It will be $$$, but you're either a rotor head or not, there's no halfway. I don't like my wings attached to a pole spinning around my head. my animal side is utterly convinced that my logical side IS trying to cause my immediate demise. I also developed this fear of hypersonic metals at about the same time, so that really controls my desire to observe those events personally. Underground missile silos seemed to be really safe back then.
It's possible you won't develop either trait.

Go do a young eagles EAA demo flight, if they still do that after Covid.

I was hoping @CappyAmeric had proffered better recruiting detail since he's kinda current.
 
#24
Crowns also, AND eons ago the only fix for the cavities was tooth removal, since the only qualified dentists were military and you couldn't pay to get it done. Funny, it didn't matter when you were a B52 tail gunner enlisted puke, or service tech operating the armpit ordinance.

Tankers are commercial planes with fuel tanks instead of most of the seats, so you come out with a rating and PIC time and just need rating time in the airlines current plane; the holy grail so to speak.

Go find a helo training school and do a intro flight. It will be $$$, but you're either a rotor head or not, there's no halfway. I don't like my wings attached to a pole spinning around my head. my animal side is utterly convinced that my logical side IS trying to cause my immediate demise. I also developed this fear of hypersonic metals at about the same time, so that really controls my desire to observe those events personally. Underground missile silos seemed to be really safe back then.
It's possible you won't develop either trait.

Go do a young eagles EAA demo flight, if they still do that after Covid.

I was hoping @CappyAmeric had proffered better recruiting detail since he's kinda current.
I'll look into the helo options! I've taken a flight in a helo before (MD500, doors off) and loved it, but I'm sure it's different from the flying side. I love the versatility of helos, so that's a road I'll be pursuing at least a little further. From some (admittedly brief) research, it seems like pursuing the ASEL rating first, then possibly going for a rotary add-on (which has a lower hour requirement) afterward, would fit me best, both financially and because if I decide I want to fly rotary, I also want to be able to fly fixed-wing for family trips and whatnot.

NOTE: Maybe it sounds argumentative, maybe not, but regardless, that's not the intent. I'm just trying to bounce ideas around and see if anyone can find flaws with my plans. Thanks again to everyone who's helping me out here!
 
#27
I'll look into the helo options! I've taken a flight in a helo before (MD500, doors off) and loved it, but I'm sure it's different from the flying side. I love the versatility of helos, so that's a road I'll be pursuing at least a little further. From some (admittedly brief) research, it seems like pursuing the ASEL rating first, then possibly going for a rotary add-on (which has a lower hour requirement) afterward, would fit me best, both financially and because if I decide I want to fly rotary, I also want to be able to fly fixed-wing for family trips and whatnot.

NOTE: Maybe it sounds argumentative, maybe not, but regardless, that's not the intent. I'm just trying to bounce ideas around and see if anyone can find flaws with my plans. Thanks again to everyone who's helping me out here!
Air Force does have a fixed wing to rotor wing path. All rotorwing first do UPT in fixed wing T6. After UPT, there are 3 "drops" - heavies (tankers/bombers), fighters, and helo - heavies go to the T1 Jayhawk, fighters go to the T38, and helos go to the HH1 (modified Huey) at Ft Rucker (there is an Air Force training squadron there). No matter what path you take, after UPT, you can get FAA Commercial and Instrument certificates by simply filling out a form. My son was Air Force Academy, did UPT in T6 at Vance AFB and HH1 at Ft Rucker.

... but that is a lot of time and effort to get to the actual job of flying. At least 3 years - and then you have to go to the specific aircraft school. My son went Hueys with training at Kirkland AFB... another 9 months. Then 6-12 months of training at the air base you go to. He was in almost 5 years before he was mission qualified.
 
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#28
... in the same 5 years, if you went the civilian route, you could have 3-4 times the flying time, be fully rated with ATP certificate, and working for a major airline with a 40 year / $6-8 million career ahead of you.
 
#29
All good points. What I meant by getting the rotary add-on was that I would do that for my rotary PPL if I find out that I absolutely love helo flying. The time commitment is huge, obviously, but if I decide to go the military route, that's not going to be a concern. The civilian route seems to be much more profitable, but airline pilots fly straight and level at an altitude where you can't make out little details on the ground. It's kind of a selfish reason to serve, and it's not my primary reason for the reason previously mentioned, but it's an experience that you can only get in the military. (Wow I said reason a lot in that sentence!) Can bush pilots fly low level canyon runs? Yes. Can they do it (dependent on aircraft type) do it at 300 knots or in a combat rescue helicopter? No. It's an experience that if I want to have it, (and I very much want to have it) I have to take it before commercial flying. After I finish up in the military, then I can go fly commercial. Another bonus for the Guard/Reserve here, I can fly for the airlines and get the hours and the money but then 1 weekend a month, 2 weeks a year go fly an amazing aircraft and serve others at the same time(well, only part of the military pilot life is flying, but it's still flying). So, not only is it the service aspect, but the opportunity to do something that not too many people ever get a chance to do is also very attractive. Given all the above, with the option to fly for the airlines (after AF training and seasoning etc), choose where I live, and the additional stability, right now (and this could change), I'm thinking that the Air National Guard or Air Force Reserve is the best balance of what I want to do. A bit of flying big iron, a bit of flying helos or fighters (or if I don't get my first 2 choices, heavies), and the ability to stay in one place really appeals.

Looking back at this after writing, it seems a bit argumentative, so once again, I'll note that that's not my intention.
 
#35
Question- what’s the point of a Chandelle? It seems like just a climbing turn, and everyone can do those. Also, the difference between private and commercial steep turns?
The chandelle demonstrates mastery over constantly changing control forces and energy management.

Tolerances are the main differences between steep turns from private/commercial/type rating.