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Pumpkin drop event

Best high speed model?

#1
I'm thinking of a project that my kids would enjoy, and want to build a high speed model that can take a remotely triggered rocket engine in the back.

Can you folks recommend an airframe that's good for high speed flight?
 

FDS

Well-known member
#2
You might want to start with something a bit slower. If you have not flown an RC plane before stuff like that ends up as a debris field pretty fast.
Or fly an unguided model rocket if you want simple speed. You could launch one from an RC mothership to combine the two.
 
#3
Been flying helis for 5 years, and planes for 2. The flying isn't a problem, I can hover, harrier, and happily do high speed inverted passes.

But I've no clue what airframe would be suitable for this :)
 

FDS

Well-known member
#4
I would look at one of the flying wings or jets in that case. Something like an Arrow would probably take a solid rocket booster without coming apart.
You could also use the rocket motor to get airborne like the military do on short takeoffs, that might be pyrotechnic enough to hook the kids.
 

Flite Risk

Active member
#5
Super bee would bee my vote.
Throw some wing tip rockets on it.

You almost don't need rockets with the Super bee if you give it the proper equipment it shoils do over 100 mph!
 
#6
Thanks guys, going to start with the FT Super Bee, the twin props mean there's clearance on the centre line, so a rocket at the rear and move the battery forwards should work. And I've 2 quad motors lying around spare :)

I think the FT Racer might be worth a shot too, will pick up one of those as well I think :)
 

Arcfyre

Well-known member
#8
I'm working on a modified arrow to take a camera more easily. I doubled the pod on top and bottom so it has more room inside. You could do the same thing and put a rocket in the second pod.

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mrjdstewart

Well-known member
#9
Super bee would bee my vote.
Throw some wing tip rockets on it.

You almost don't need rockets with the Super bee if you give it the proper equipment it shoils do over 100 mph!
i would never try and put 2 rockets on the wing tips of anything. trying to time and get 2 brushless motors to work together in unison is hard enough. trying to get 2 rockets to ignite at the exact same time and provide the exact amount of thrust is going to be impossible.

need to stick with 1 rocket motor mounted on the center line.

just my $.02,

me :cool:
 

L Edge

Well-known member
#11
Make sure you have the rocket in the centerline of the aircraft. Also make sure you use the rocket that doesn't have the charge to deploy the parachute., otherwise your foam will disappear.
Use Estes info in the back of the catalog to help pick the size of rocket and approximately what height it will go.

Mine went about 400 ft and I was able to play with aileron and elevator on the way up and down. It was fairly heavy and the glide down was steep. Since no one was present, keep on backing up for I have had weird takeoffs on other rocket setups.

Gladly answer any questions you have.


 
#14
Ok, basic research is done. The FT Super Bee speed build kit is here, six plugged rockets, a dozen igniters and a remote receiver switch are on the way.

Needs some fiddling with the transmitter programming, but I think I can have the arm switch on my radio, with the little girl having the ignition control after that.

Plan is to fly the model normally for a few minutes, with her having some sticktime, and as the battery drains down we'll arm the rocket and I'll see if I can keep it under control :-D
 

Vimana89

Well-known member
#19
I'm thinking of a project that my kids would enjoy, and want to build a high speed model that can take a remotely triggered rocket engine in the back.

Can you folks recommend an airframe that's good for high speed flight?
Sorry I got around to this late, and good luck with rockets on your current build. This might be my own bias and love for this type of plane, but I think a slender delta airframe(think a classic dart paper plane, a skinny, acute triangle) Would be perfect. The theory is that the vortex lift generated by the shape makes it fly well at slow and moderate speeds as well as(for full scale jets) supersonic speeds. This type of planform gives you extremely low drag and high strength which is great for high speed flying, and no long wings to bend or rip off in sudden high speed maneuvers.It flies like a rocket at high speeds, but it can also slow fly on low throttle, especially with some high alpha. It's ridiculously easy to land, with a huge ground effect. It can climb pretty much vertically, and there's no type of stall it can't recover from. I think this type of shape would make an excellent rocket plane.
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Jollz

New member
#20
My experience from flying the FT racer was that the wing root is not super strong, as would be expected from a foam spar. Mine failed spectacularly during a high speed pass causing a big cloud of foam and much hilarity on the flying field.

Recommendations: Strengthen or replace spar with something stronger than foam and if possible have dual throws setup for regular and high speed flight envelopes.