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Best suitable model

#1
I have a turnigy d3536/5 1450kv with a 9/6 prop, 2 9gram servos a Thunderbird esc and a 2s lipo from a botched scratch built I made yrs ago. Would any of these ft kits be suitable for these parts?
 

d8veh

Elite member
#3
I would say that the motor is too heavy and powerful for the flyer. It should be OK for any of the planes around 1000mm wingspan, like the Old Speedster, Simple Scout, Sportster, 3D, Edge 540. Mig-3, Old Fogey, Simple Cub, Simple Storch, Spitfire, etc. It depends on your flying skill which one would be most suitable. For the models that need a bit of performance, like the Edge, I would say that it would be better to go up to 3S with something like a 9x5 prop. 9x6 might be OK. The servos are a bit on the light side for those planes. It depends on their quality.
 
#4
I would say that the motor is too heavy and powerful for the flyer. It should be OK for any of the planes around 1000mm wingspan, like the Old Speedster, Simple Scout, Sportster, 3D, Edge 540. Mig-3, Old Fogey, Simple Cub, Simple Storch, Spitfire, etc. It depends on your flying skill which one would be most suitable. For the models that need a bit of performance, like the Edge, I would say that it would be better to go up to 3S with something like a 9x5 prop. 9x6 might be OK. The servos are a bit on the light side for those planes. It depends on their quality.
Thanks, I ordered this stuff yrs ago and had what I'll call a successful failure of sorts. I made a plane and had all my control surfaces function. However I had structural issues with my firewall and it never flew. Then I put everything away for a long time.
 

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#8
Motor may be a bit big, but on 2s it isn't going to have a ton of power. I found the flyer needs a lot of nose weight anyway. The storch is a great flier, but if you haven't built much is it a bit trickier to build. The problem you're going to have is the battery. 2S isn't going to let you fly most of those bigger planes. And stay away from the simple cub until you have some flight time. It can be very sensitive. If you want to go bigger, the simple scout is a easy build and floats along well, but I think whatever approach you take you're going to want a higher cell count battery. Good luck and let us know how it goes!
 
#9
Motor may be a bit big, but on 2s it isn't going to have a ton of power. I found the flyer needs a lot of nose weight anyway. The storch is a great flier, but if you haven't built much is it a bit trickier to build. The problem you're going to have is the battery. 2S isn't going to let you fly most of those bigger planes. And stay away from the simple cub until you have some flight time. It can be very sensitive. If you want to go bigger, the simple scout is a easy build and floats along well, but I think whatever approach you take you're going to want a higher cell count battery. Good luck and let us know how it goes!
What size mah would you recommend in a 3s? I'm not sure why I bought what I did at the time, there was reasoning behind it although probably flawed.
 

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#10
That really depends on the plane. I believe I used a 1300mah on my simple scout. Some of the smaller planes will only fit a 850mah though, while others can take a 2200mah. If I was you, I'd pick up at least one 850mah and one 1300mah. If your budget allows, get a couple for more flight time and maybe throw in a 1000mah or a 2200. That should give you a battery that would fit most FT builds. Try these guys, they have some great prices and I've had good luck with them. china hobby line: https://chinahobbyline.com/
 

jaredstrees

Well-known member
#11
oh, and make sure you get batteries with a good c rating. That is basically how much they can discharge or charge quickly. To low a c rating and you may bog down the motor as it can't draw enough power. 40c is probably a good starting point.
 

d8veh

Elite member
#12
C-rating and MAh work together. 40C and 1200mHa means that the battery can supply 40 x 1200 = 48000mA = 48A. As a general rule I aim to have something like double the amps I need for long battery life and good flight duration, so that battery would be OK for a motor that draws a maximum 24 amps.

So, you work back from your motor and prop to see how many amps it's likely to pull, then you can choose a C-rating and mHa to suit. say your motor draws 20A, then you could use a 40C 1000mAh or 80C 500mAh. or any similar combination.

The mAh is the amount of charge in the battery, which is basically the length of your flight possible. The more mHa, the longer you can fly. With a 20A max motor drawing an average 10 amps in flight, a 1000mAh battery will last 1/10 hours = 6 minutes. A 500mAh one will last 3 minutes.

Finally, the more mAh you have, the bigger and heavier the battery is. A big battery in a small plane or a small battery in a big plane might not have the weight to get the C og G correct.

In summary, you have to juggle 3 things: The right weight for your plane; enough current for your motor; and enough capacity to get a long enough flight.

It's not an exact science. These are only guidelines for what you need, though the maths is exact. You have to think about proportion of the time you'll be flying with full throttle and maximum current. if you have loads of money, you can always buy the highest C-rating when you buy batteries because they'll work in the highest range of applications. If money is tight, so you have to buy 20C batteries, you have to be more careful with your calculations to make sure that it can give enough current.
 
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jaredstrees

Well-known member
#13
That was a much better explanation. You don't always need a high capacity battery, but I've found it's better to get a higher c rating up front so I don't have to worry about my battery not being able to handle what I'm going to put it through.
 
#14
C-rating and MAh work together. 40C and 1200mHa means that the battery can supply 40 x 1200 = 48000mA = 48A. As a general rule I aim to have something like double the amps I need for long battery life and good flight duration, so that battery would be OK for a motor that draws a maximum 24 amps.

So, you work back from your motor and prop to see how many amps it's likely to pull, then you can choose a C-rating and mHa to suit. say your motor draws 20A, then you could use a 40C 1000mAh or 80C 500mAh. or any similar combination.

The mAh is the amount of charge in the battery, which is basically the length of your flight possible. The more mHa, the longer you can fly. With a 20A max motor drawing an average 10 amps in flight, a 1000mAh battery will last 1/10 hours = 6 minutes. A 500mAh one will last 3 minutes.

Finally, the more mAh you have, the bigger and heavier the battery is. A big battery in a small plane or a small battery in a big plane might not have the weight to get the C og G correct.

In summary, you have to juggle 3 things: The right weight for your plane; enough current for your motor; and enough capacity to get a long enough flight.

It's not an exact science. These are only guidelines for what you need, though the maths is exact. You have to think about proportion of the time you'll be flying with full throttle and maximum current. if you have loads of money, you can always buy the highest C-rating when you buy batteries because they'll work in the highest range of applications. If money is tight aso you have to buy 20C batteries, you have to be more careful with your calculations to make sure that it can give enough current.
Thanks for the refresher, I remember this from way back but couldnt recall the formula.