• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

BumbleDrone 3000

dezertdog

Senior Member
#61
#2. :cool:

Finally got to the hardware store and picked up a metric ton of black zip ties, also the new cover from fpvmanuals showed up. I've got black props too, but missing a pusher so sticking with gray for the moment (and hey they're already balanced so might as we run em out).

blacked_out.jpg


Unfortunately it's been raining for almost a week straight here so not getting much stick time...
 
Last edited:

dezertdog

Senior Member
#63
I guess you mean counter rotating...

I still don't understand the weird shape of the top plate...
Yeah, I picked up a cheap pack of GWS black 1047's, but they were sold out of the 1047p's for now, no sense mucking up my nice balance/mount job for a photo op.

That's funny you mention that, I had a friend sit there and try to figure out what it was the other night (skull, bear, ghost)... I've actually never thought twice about the shape for some reason, I always just assumed it was function > form, i.e. the risers are here, we need protection there, done.
 

dezertdog

Senior Member
#65
I've had a slight problem with the booms creeping back in fast forward flight and also from rough takeoffs/landings etc where the front stanchions catch a bit on grass or rocks. They are tight, and will crush the booms or delrin if I go any tighter.

I really didn't want to put screws in there and risk breaking a boom in a crash if I could avoid it, so after trying a few things I came up with a great solution I'm going to call the Tricopter Boom Fuse.

Take a couple small zip ties, drop them through the boom lockout holes, snip them flush with the bottom plate and off you go! The booms stay locked out in most conditions, but a bit of pressure and they pop out and let the boom fold.

booms_fuse.jpg

boom_fuse_mounted.jpg



Note! The only thing holding the zip tie in is gravity and some tension from the boom. I wouldn't recommend "zipping" the tie. I experimented with that and it takes too much force to pop loose.
 
Last edited:

bicyclemonkey

Flying Derp
Mentor
#70
...I just decided to chop them in half at 18". The kit calls for the rear boom to be 3" shorter than the front two..
This may have already been asked but why did the Delrin kit call for making the rear boom 3" shorter than the front two? Does this apply to pretty much all tricopters? I did the same thing and got 18" square dowels but I'm wondering if I should make the rear shorted like this kit called for.
 
Last edited:

colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#71
This may have already been asked but why did the Delrin kit call for making the rear boom 3" shorter than the front two? Does this apply to pretty much all tricopters? I did the same thing and got 18" square dowels but I'm wondering if I should make the rear shorted like this kit called for.
If you want to be sure, measure so you have equal distances between motors, and equal distances from motors to the CG.
 

dezertdog

Senior Member
#72
This may have already been asked but why did the Delrin kit call for making the rear boom 3" shorter than the front two? Does this apply to pretty much all tricopters? I did the same thing and got 18" square dowels but I'm wondering if I should make the rear shorted like this kit called for.
Yes, the rear is 3" shorter. In my case it's two fronts at 18" and the rear at 15". This is to compensate for the length of the rear yaw assembly. My rotor spans measure 34" in any direction.