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Cutting Plans Out

The Hangar

Well-known member
#21
I built an FT Alpha, nice enough plane, it kinda begs for bigger control surfaces, though.
There were plans for designing and building a DC-3 in the week before FliteFest but that didn't happen. (loong story...)
The DC-3 is now postponed until after the Electra I'm designing for FTFC2020. (Carl Goldberg, not Lockheed)
If it works out the DC-3 will be an easy semi-scale build with a (semi-) rounded fuselage no posterboard needed at around 40" of span.
At Flitefest I scratch built a plane a friend had made “plans” for. They were definitely not made for fb... it didn't fly, but I’ll probably work on it some more. Let me know what y’all think about it!
 

Attachments

alan0043

Active member
#22
I did that just this weekend for a new FT Goblin I'm building with a light kit. It is quite a pain as you'll be cutting the plans out once to mount to the poster board, once to "fat cut" them out of the poster board, and once to fine cut all the edges. I use 3M Super 45 but really any spray glue works just fine.

And yes on reusing the plans, I've used my TT plans about three times, and a buddy of mine wants to borrow it to get into the hobby. Quite useful!

The guys did release a video a while back about this process. Link is as follows:
Thank you for posting the video. It is going to be a big help.
 

slowjo

Well-known member
#23
Hi Everyone,

I have a question about plans. There might be a thread about my question but right now I have not done a search yet. But here is my question. Does anyone glue their plans to poster board then cut the plans out ? My thinking is that you could make the plane several times from the same set of plans. If there is a link, can you please post. I am interested in building a simple scout.

Thanks for any info,
Al
I pin them on, that way I can mark all the inner lines with pins also, like CG, holes for bbq skewers... jo
 

sundown57

Well-known member
#24
I tape them on, cut the outside and make like small 1/4 inch long marks for pieces to be removed then un tape it and make the XXXXXX cuts so I can reuse the plans.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#28
Does anyone here use super 77 to attach the plans to foam? I’ve heard of the method but never tried it myself...
I use the Loctite or Elmer's spray glue that I can buy at Joann Fabric or Hobby Lobby or Michael's with a coupon. I print out the plans, cut them with my wife's straight edge scrapbook cutter, and then tape the plans together. I then spray the foamboard and lay my sheet down, sometimes cutting pieces of the plans before I tack them to get them to fit properly on the foamboard, so that I don't have to have a bunch of excess foamboard (yes, FB is cheap, but why leave half a sheet of unused foamboard if I can fit everything on one sheet?)

The only one I've considered cutting a template for is the Versa Wing, but that's because we use those for our combat events, and if they last for 3 combat events, I figure I'm not flying aggressively enough. So, because of that, I have cut patterns out with masonite so that I can trace it, and where the score cuts are, I make little notches at the ends of the masonite. That way, I can mark it and make lines with a ruler, and then score them using a utility knife and the edge of the ruler. Works pretty well.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#29
How hard would it be to remove the paper after getting the parts cut out?
Removing the paper isn't hard if you just do a quick spray, just enough to make the surface tacky. You really just want it enough to bond. If you do that, though, remember to remove the paper before you glue; otherwise, when you glue pieces together (like in an A fold or B fold) it will separate and pull away from the foam, and won't hold properly.
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#30
Removing the paper isn't hard if you just do a quick spray, just enough to make the surface tacky. You really just want it enough to bond. If you do that, though, remember to remove the paper before you glue; otherwise, when you glue pieces together (like in an A fold or B fold) it will separate and pull away from the foam, and won't hold properly.
I think there are different 3M adhesive sprays that aren't as permanent as 77 is - I want to say 75 is a temporary one but I'm not sure on that
 

Zetoyoc

Well-known member
#31
i wouldn't use 77 personally. usually i find it bonds mostly permanently. I have had good luck using a simple glue stick. it holds well enough to get the parts cut and is still easy enough to peel apart before folding and glueing the parts up.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#32
I think I’ll give the super 77 a shot on my next build, the ft mustang. So spray the sheet of foam and set the pieces on. How long should I wait till it’s dry and I can start cutting?
 

SP0NZ

FT CAD Gremlin
Staff member
Moderator
Mentor
#33
I think I’ll give the super 77 a shot on my next build, the ft mustang. So spray the sheet of foam and set the pieces on. How long should I wait till it’s dry and I can start cutting?
3M Super 77 isn't meant to be removable. You also want to make sure you spray the paper plans, not the foam board. If you are going to try and remove the paper template from the foam board after cutting, use a very very light coat of S77. Let it sit for about 2 minutes before putting it on the foam board, and do not press it down firmly to the foam.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#34
I think there are different 3M adhesive sprays that aren't as permanent as 77 is - I want to say 75 is a temporary one but I'm not sure on that
Most likely. I've not used the 3M stuff, just the Loctite and Elmer's Spray Glue. And when I spray, I do a light coat onto the foam board. I know Dan says not to do that, but I've not had a problem with it, myself. Maybe it's the type of glue I'm using. :)

One thing I WILL warn about, regardless of which spray adhesive you use - it sticks to EVERYTHING. I mean EVERYTHING. If you have a glass that might get some overspray, or your table, or your cutting tools, or anything else within a potential radius of the spray, the spray glue will adhere to it. Therefore, if you're spraying, keep your workspace area clear, and maybe have something under it if you plan to spray and want it to come up - maybe an old plastic tablecloth, or a trash bag as a drop cloth, or something that you don't mind getting ruined.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#35
@sprzout said he has sometimes used Loctite and Elmers spray adhesive - would that be more suited to the job? It's sounding from most of you that S77 isn't the best option. I was going to use it as I've seen it at the local walmart. Chances are they have the Loctite and Elmers as well. I'll check. Thanks for your help - that's one think that has always been frustrating to me - the pieces coming off my foam before I've got it all cut out.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#36
Most likely. I've not used the 3M stuff, just the Loctite and Elmer's Spray Glue. And when I spray, I do a light coat onto the foam board. I know Dan says not to do that, but I've not had a problem with it, myself. Maybe it's the type of glue I'm using. :)

One thing I WILL warn about, regardless of which spray adhesive you use - it sticks to EVERYTHING. I mean EVERYTHING. If you have a glass that might get some overspray, or your table, or your cutting tools, or anything else within a potential radius of the spray, the spray glue will adhere to it. Therefore, if you're spraying, keep your workspace area clear, and maybe have something under it if you plan to spray and want it to come up - maybe an old plastic tablecloth, or a trash bag as a drop cloth, or something that you don't mind getting ruined.
I was planing on doing it outside:) How long does it take to dry so you can start cutting?
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#37
I was planing on doing it outside:) How long does it take to dry so you can start cutting?
It's pretty quick. I spray on a LIGHT coat at about 18-24" distance, get my pattern set and smoothed out, and let it set for maybe 5-10 minutes before I start cutting? It basically makes it tacky, but the paper will peel up after it's been cut - it's not meant for a permanent stick.

Oh, and if you have a Hobby Lobby, Michael's, or Joann Fabrics near you, try there for the Loctite or Elmer's spray adhesives. Their apps almost always offer a 40% off coupon on non-sale items, and the spray adhesive is almost NEVER on sale. May as well save yourself a couple bucks if you can!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#38
I agree with @sprzout, to use any kind of rattle can on foam, the key is to have the can 18-24 inches away form the foam. Apparently there is something in the propellent that eats foam. The distance allows enough time for the propellent to evaporate and not eat the foam.

As a matter of practice always try a new product on a piece of scrap.

I use glue sticks as an alternative to spray glue. I've not found any glue sticks that eat foam.
 

skymaster

Well-known member
#40
why don't you guys just use pieces of masking tape to hold the plans on the foam board and then trace them onto the foam board, and use a pin to mark the middle cut outs. you do not have to trace the whole thing just the most difficult parts like rounded corners, the corners just make a mark that connects the straight lines you would them use a ruler to make the lines connect. i have never made a video but maybe i should make one and show you how i do my scratch builds.