• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

designing plans

eagle4

New member
#1
Hey gang, I'd like to design my own plane, and have plans for it that i can lay out over the foamboard, just like the FliteTest plans.

How do you go about making these? I know 3d modeling packages like 3dsmax and maya rather well, would they help or do you use something like sketchup? i'm just wondering how you'd go from a 3d model to the layed out plan view?

Dave
 

zev

lumpy member
#3
sketchup is mainly a 3d program, why not use something more like illustrator, inkscape, photoshop, or gimp? even MS paint! any drawing program really.
 

OutcastZeroOne

Fly, yes... Land, no
#4
there is a plugin available for Sketchup 7 that lets you take a model, unfold into a flat peice and print out plans from that. RCGroups has a big thread about how to use sketchup.

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=920416

Sorry for the offsite link. Me personally I just start with a simple drawing on paper, and figure out how to make plans from there. I'll draw out a set of plans on some posterboard or craft cardboard and cut it out. If I like what I've made I then make the hand drawn plans into a file in my CAD program (CADintosh, great inexpensive Mac CAD program).

Of the programs that zev has listed, the only one I can say to use is Illustrator, but its $$$. Most drawing programs are great for making art, but not so good for making plans. It can be very difficult to edit a part if you make a mistake or change your mind on something.
 

zev

lumpy member
#5
+1 on drawing it

waa? illustrator is hard to edit with? if you use the pen or line tool (anything but the brush) it is completely editable. any way, gimp and Inkscape are free, and have most all of the capabilities.
 

OutcastZeroOne

Fly, yes... Land, no
#6
+1 on drawing it

waa? illustrator is hard to edit with? if you use the pen or line tool (anything but the brush) it is completely editable. any way, gimp and Inkscape are free, and have most all of the capabilities.
Of the programs that zev has listed, the only one I can say to use is Illustrator, but its $$$.
I've used illustrator for a long time and its great for plans. Might help if you read the post instead of skimming it :p
 

zev

lumpy member
#7
sorry about that!

about the price, the Pirate Bay is awsome, hint hint, I am not suggesting anything…
 

OutcastZeroOne

Fly, yes... Land, no
#8
:p. I remember I got Illustrator really cheap because my local collage was selling a student version. only differance between the comercial version and student version was that "you where not allowed to make something for profit". bassicly meaning your where "legally" not to use it for work related uses. how they would figure that out, I do not know.

One really nice thing about Illustrator and programs like that is it is very easy to make nice, compound curves (curves that change angle, or tightness of the turn midway). Try doing that in a CAD program.... nightmare...
 

zev

lumpy member
#9
indeed. bezier curves with the pen tool FTW. possibly the best thing ever to come to any drawing program.
 

earthsciteach

Moderator
Moderator
#12
Don't feel alone, aiidanwings. I actually have AutoCad, but still prefer to hand draw the plans for my designs. The weird thing is, in my previous career as an engineer, I never drafted by hand. I feel like I have a better feel for the "flow" of the design when drawing by hand. I'm just weird that way, I guess.
 
#14
I too use a CAD program for my designs. I have TurboCad Deluxe 16 and am still learning about it. When saveing the drawing I save it directly as a jpeg file.
 
#16
:p. I remember I got Illustrator really cheap because my local collage was selling a student version. only differance between the comercial version and student version was that "you where not allowed to make something for profit". bassicly meaning your where "legally" not to use it for work related uses. how they would figure that out, I do not know.

One really nice thing about Illustrator and programs like that is it is very easy to make nice, compound curves (curves that change angle, or tightness of the turn midway). Try doing that in a CAD program.... nightmare...
I don't know about older versions of Adobe products but as of CS3 student editions you can legally use the program for profit. The difference between the regular and student versions is that the student is the only licensed user instead of just "single-user". I have been using illustrator for plans for just a short while, I'm not sure If I will continue using it though, might try sketchup.