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Edge 540 battery

#1
I’ve been doing some nifty things with my bushwhacker and haven’t crashed for a few months now. Because of that I’m wanting to build a 540 to learn more acrobatics but am on a budget. I want to do it on 4 cell but would need to buy the batteries and charger since my charger is 2-3 cell. Is there much of a power difference between 3 cell and 4? Will it limit what I can do 3d wise to have 3 cell?
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#2
That's a big 'ol can of worms! Going from 3s to 4s is like going from a four cylinder car to a six cylinder. Moah Powah! The Edge can fly wonderfully on 3s with the right motor, esc and prop combination. 4s would certainly be more exciting, but it's not necessary.

I happen to have a personal interest in flying 3d on the cheap. Check out this thread!
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#3
I’ve been doing some nifty things with my bushwhacker and haven’t crashed for a few months now. Because of that I’m wanting to build a 540 to learn more acrobatics but am on a budget. I want to do it on 4 cell but would need to buy the batteries and charger since my charger is 2-3 cell. Is there much of a power difference between 3 cell and 4? Will it limit what I can do 3d wise to have 3 cell?
The formula for determining the power is simply the voltage multiplied by the current.
So if you were using a 12V battery and drawing 12 Amps you would use 144 Watts. Now for the same load if you were using 16V and drawing 16 Amps your total power would be 256 Watts. Not quite double but still a massive increase!

Just make sure that the motor and ESC can handle the higher voltage and current. You will also need to reduce the prop pitch and/or the diameter because the higher rotational speed of the prop will massively load the motor/ESC and damage could occur!

Have fun!
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#4
For 3D you want power ( lower kv ) that will swing a big prop to keep air moving over the control surfaces at low speed. On my Edge I went with a 3516 1000kv motor 12X4 prop on 3s, when I figured the weight of 2816 1000 kv motor on 4s the weights were darn near equal and I could swing a bigger prop, and much more power. If I want to go crazy I can run 4s my advice any set up you decide on make sure it is capable of running 4s, I have built numerous 3D planes in this size and the 2800 size motors just feel underpowered unless on 4s.
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#5
Bricks is right. Always better to go with less cells and bigger prop. If using the C pack 2215 you want big diameter and low pitch. A 10x3 would be perfect, the 10x4.5 will work fine. With the radial the 10x4.5 will rock on 3s. Think of it this way, more cells means higher rpm which means more speed. Later when you have mastered some 3D basics, you may want to play with the setup to match your style.
Personally I like fast and epic power. I do mostly high energy 3d. For low and slow you want lighter, slower, lower rpm, big prop.
 
#6
THANKS!! So if I am hearing everyone right go with 3s to start off with 3d when I get comfortable try 4s and if I like the speed and can still maneuver think of switching? Sorry I’m not too seasoned with the basics of motors and kv etc... I want to learn but also want to have fun in the sky!
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#7
THANKS!! So if I am hearing everyone right go with 3s to start off with 3d when I get comfortable try 4s and if I like the speed and can still maneuver think of switching? Sorry I’m not too seasoned with the basics of motors and kv etc... I want to learn but also want to have fun in the sky!
Speed is fun, but the most impressive 3D flying you see has nothing to do with speed. The 2d 3d edge I just designed flys very slow, but has tons of power to pull up and get that air moving over those control surfaces.
 

buzzbomb

I know nothing!
#8
Personally I like fast and epic power. I do mostly high energy 3d.
That's enticing. To me, 3d means the plane is not flying, so much as it is hovering in different attitudes. Vertical, sideways, variations of both. Now that I know what a "flush" is, I'm getting pretty stoked. That's my "stupid" flying, but with skill.

I really like to hover. I do my best with some of the planes, I've got. I'm working on a harrier. I'm not good at it. I've done one successful knife edge. I was in the zone, and it was more that than skill. You could hardly see it in my video, but I knew I was doing it, and it was AWESOME!

"High Energy 3D" sounds like me getting stupid with it. Only with skill. Though you may have posted it elsewhere, I'm sure the admins wouldn't mind if you cross-posted a video here. It's being requested after all. ;):D
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#9
Knife edges are relatively easy with most planes, tip on edge set your rudder then control altitude with throttle input alerion to keep wing vertical if needed.. When first starting 3D flying it challenges you trying to keep orientation to get correct control inputs which makes you a better flyer with all planes.
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#10
Very true @Bricks! @buzzbomb starting point to 3d is not hovering as so many think. It is doing 1000 knife edge passes from either direction with belly both facing you and away. That teaches the orientation Bricks mentioned, which is crucial. So many others spring board off of knife edge.
 

Ihichi Bolls

Well-known member
#11
If yer a car guy think big block, small block.

Low kv =low rpm, high torque. Big block
High kv= high rpm, lower torque. Small block.

Ben Harbor told me the stock c pack will let you do most 3d maneuvers as long as your not heavy handed with the glue gun.

Once you get into things like water falls and hurricanes 4s moves more air to make those happen with out a struggle.

Im still trying to fly a full pack on ANY fixed wing. Ive had the most success and progress on the edge so far. (Quad brain has me gimped)
 
#12
Awesome. Love this forum! Last question, I may have been heavy on the glue in the back making it tail heavy. I put a 2200 3 cell in there and it’s just a little tail heavy. Would I be okay flying that battery instead of the smaller 1300 it calls for if I get it valences right? Also here it is in its glory! 2663333C-331E-4464-B32F-52CCA92F4DCB.jpeg
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#13
Awesome. Love this forum! Last question, I may have been heavy on the glue in the back making it tail heavy. I put a 2200 3 cell in there and it’s just a little tail heavy. Would I be okay flying that battery instead of the smaller 1300 it calls for if I get it valences right? Also here it is in its glory! View attachment 143577
So depends on your flying skill as to balance. Extreme tail heavy makes easy hovering, very tail heavy (tuned to your style) makes all sorts of harriers, flat spins, pop tops, and knife edges easier, on balance makes for easier landings and easier smooth pattern flying. It is an edge, unlike many planes it still is very controllable and fun tail heavy. The 2200 3s is needed if using a 2215 or similar, give a solid 5 to 6mins flight. And it is easier to balance. As far as too much glue on the tail...... fill the tail with glue and show off hovering, granted that is about all the plane would do if you filled the tail with glue 😄
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#14
For your first few flight I would not fly it tail heavy use the 2200 and add some removeable weights until you see how it flies, and make your own adjustments for CG from there.