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FAA Height Restrictions

#1
Here is a screen shot of the area where I fly. There is a club near the reservoir. My sons and I like to fly at the local middle school. Both spots are in the circle. Since there is not a red or green grid over that section, does that mean we can fly higher that 400 ft?
 

Attachments

#3
According to the directions on the website, select the cross hairs and click on the map. It is supposed to indicate the max rc flight height is allowed.
 
#4
According to the directions on the website, select the cross hairs and click on the map. It is supposed to indicate the max rc flight height is allowed.
Often one hand doesn’t know what the other hand is doing in the FAA. It’s like "the speed limit is 45 if not posted".
‘Note it doesn’t say anything above 400’.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#6
I'm getting so leery of the 400 ft limit. Let me use an example:

El Capitan in Yosemite National Park is 7,569 feet high, and has a nice, steep vertical plane to it. If I were to stand at the top and throw an airplane off of the top, as soon as it clears the edge, it's now over 7,000 feet high to the ground, and, under that 400 ft AGL, could net me huge fines.

I know, I know - it's illegal to fly in a national park. I'm merely using El Capitan as an example because of the shape of the mountain, and it's well known, so people can identify with its height. But, I bring this up because if the plane flies below the top of the mountain, but above the ground level, how high up is that plane? What is illegal when looking solely at the height of the flight?

I honestly think that there needs to be some considerations taken into account of location, with the way that the FAA classifies the 400 ft AGL. And maybe they do, but don't want to state that because some idiot will argue that there's a building half a mile away that's higher than 400 ft that a plane could fly into; I don't know on that. But, I can see where there's a lot of mess and argument coming, and being the way that the government has traditionally been, it may just become a blanket "no exceptions" type of thing.
 

moret

Active member
#7
https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_fliers/

Fly your drone at or below 400 feet when in uncontrolled or "Class G" airspace. This is airspace where the FAA is not controlling manned air traffic. To determine what type of airspace you are in, refer to the mobile application that operates your drone (if so equipped) and/or use other drone-related mobile applications. Knowing your location and what airspace you're in will also help you avoid interfering with other aircraft.

So the answer is that 400 feet is the max you can fly and be legal.
If you have a not to old phone, you can get B4UFLY app or Airmap . If you are in control airspace and not at a field with a LOA with the FAA, you will need one of the app to get "permission" to fly. Sad to say but now days we all need to get up to date on the apps and rules.

I got a cheap altimeter so I could tell what my planes look like at 300 - 400 feet
 

skymaster

Active member
#8
Hello. before anything else happens Captain Video i would suggest that you clear what you are doing with the school. ask if it's ok.
 

LitterBug

Troll Spammer
#9
Hey Captain, do you know if FPV is allowed up at the reservoir? I have never seen anything up there saying it wasn't.

Cheers!
LitterBug
 

Keno

Well-known member
#12
If you go to FFA website it has the controlled airspaces areas defined. Most of us do not fly over 400 feet anyway however the sailplane people routinely do. So as this is an issue maybe still unclear as of this date and misunderstood lets get our facts correct before we start making statements that maybe correct or not correct.
 
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moret

Active member
#13
Almost enough to encourage one to get part 107 certified.
107 is also limited to 400 feet.
Go to the FAA website 400 feet is the limit, it is just that people refuse to accept that the rules have changed. Yes under 107 you can fly within 400 feet of a tower, building, etc and go up to 400 feet above that tower. I have not found that "loophole" for non 107 flyers. Do not take what you read on a forum or from someone else or the AMA, go to the FAA website and know the rules No one else will be going to court with you. You will need to know some of this for the test anyway.
FAA website
https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_fliers/

Also on the website is a link to the webinars they did. They answered a lot of question
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#14
107 is also limited to 400 feet.
Go to the FAA website 400 feet is the limit, it is just that people refuse to accept that the rules have changed. Yes under 107 you can fly within 400 feet of a tower, building, etc and go up to 400 feet above that tower. I have not found that "loophole" for non 107 flyers. Do not take what you read on a forum or from someone else or the AMA, go to the FAA website and know the rules No one else will be going to court with you. You will need to know some of this for the test anyway.
FAA website
https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_fliers/

Also on the website is a link to the webinars they did. They answered a lot of question
People are also only supposed to fly their aircraft within line of sight of the pilot or a spotter. And yet we hear people bragging about being able to go 5-6 miles out with their aircraft...People are still going to do it. In addition, what does your definition of "Ground Level" mean? Where the pilot is? If I stand on the side of a 600 ft tall cliff and throw the plane off, but I never fly above the edge of the cliff except when I land at the top, how high up is my plane? You know someone's gonna get busted for something stupid like this, and there's going to be a court case that will set precedence for the future.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
#15
From the little bit I have heard about new regs The altitude is 400ft above the ground you stand on. for part 107 I believe taht rule also applies but waivers can be had. Also part 107 when legally filming within town or city limits you are locked into 100 ft above the tallest building within the working area.

And no that does not mean you can fly 2K plus feet in New York city at 100 ft over the Empire state building. Waivers are required.. gl gettin that one hehe and that would probably require a complete safety crew AND more insurance then all of us could afford put together.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#17
From the little bit I have heard about new regs The altitude is 400ft above the ground you stand on. for part 107 I believe taht rule also applies but waivers can be had. Also part 107 when legally filming within town or city limits you are locked into 100 ft above the tallest building within the working area.

And no that does not mean you can fly 2K plus feet in New York city at 100 ft over the Empire state building. Waivers are required.. gl gettin that one hehe and that would probably require a complete safety crew AND more insurance then all of us could afford put together.
Not to mention that I think most of NYC is a "No Fly Zone" in general, but I know when Trump or his family are visiting Trump Tower NOTAMs go into effect grounding almost all flights with the exception of commercial, emergency, and/or military aircraft. Makes sense to most of us, and while I may have my druthers about this particular President, I can understand why that would happen as a reason of national security for a President or his immediate family.