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Fan Created Designs For The Flight Test Team

#1
Project 1 - 15/02/14
So here is my first design for the crew. Not quite perfect (OK not perfect at all), but you get the jist.
I was thinking about making a 5CH bomber warbird to go in Josh Bixler's "warbirds project".
So far here are some screenshots.

screenshot bomber 1.png screenshot bomber 2.png screenshot bomber 3.png screenshot bomber.png
I will be doing more on the designing in the future but so far does anyone have any recommendtions?
I was thinking of putting 4x 28mm EDF units *Link - http://www.horizonhobby.com/products/delta-v-180m-28mm-edf-unit-EFLDF180M * under the wings.
What should I do about undercarriage?
 

adamd

skunkworx hobbies
#2
This looks identical to my first twin design so I will tell you where I went wrong and it might help out.
I decided to go with a undercarriage like a c130. What I dident even think about was how a plane rotates around the center of lift while taking off. My hind end was sticking out past the wheels which caused the back fuselage to jam against the ground on take off and not alow rotation unless it hit a bumb and jumped into the air. So make sure she can rotat!

Streight bombays are much easyer than cargo doors. I went with cargo doors again much like a c130, releaseing things was much a goldberg device to make sure the cargo slid back out the door without getting snaged and changing the cg drastically.

I dident have a rudder just used proportional thrust and no sterable nose gear this to my suprise worked great!

I left the side profile how it was and made the center nose of the fuselage able to slide out, just due to the fact these thing end up big and its hard to get your hand from one side to the other to fix or place electronics.

Bomb bay cg and wing center of lift should be hand and hand. When you drop your payload you dont want a drastic weight "shift" just weight loss.

Stack it filled with stuff and have fun!
.
 
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#3
im not sure if you're building off a design which already exists, but if you remove the top lip part of your fuselage you'll decrease drag, and if you angle your fuse just right you'll have a lifting body plane. Look up Burnelli, I am quite partial to his designs. I even built myself one of his UB-14 planes.
 
#4
Update - 16/02/14 V1.5

Here is my updated version.

bomber picture 2.png
I have put a maintenance hatch on the top for easy access,

bomber picture 3.png
I re-designed the tail stabilisers

bomber picture 4.png
I included the straight Bomb-bay doors suggested by adamd (thanks!).
I'm not sure what you mean by the "top lip" part of my fuselage eagle4.

bomber picture 1.png bomber picture 5.png
Anyway, I added the 4x EDF units I was hoping to put on and I think they look quite cool.

bomber picture 6.png
I also re-designed the wings because I though they looked a little naff :).

Any more suggestions?
Thanks!
 
#6
Avro 730 Model
This is the Avro 730.
avro730.jpg
The Avro 730 was a planned Mach 3 reconnaissance aircraft and bomber for the Royal Air Force. If it had proceeded into service, the aircraft would have replaced the V bombers as the primary delivery system for Britain's nuclear deterrent. It was cancelled in 1957 along with other development on manned aircraft as part of the 1957 Defence White Paper.
The Avro 730 was a tail-first aircraft, an approach which greatly reduced trim-drag while increasing lift at slower speeds. The aircraft had a long, thin fuselage with a high fineness ratio; a small tapered almost-rectangular wing was mounted centrally on the fuselage. Four Armstrong-Siddeley P.156 engines were carried, two each mounted over-under in pods at the extreme tips of the wings. No conventional canopy was fitted in order to maintain the fineness ratio, the cockpit featured only two small windows facing to the side, and used a retractable periscope for viewing during take-off and landing. A crew of three would be carried: pilot, navigator and radar operator.
This initial version was intended strictly for the reconnaissance role, using its "Red Drover" sideways-looking radar to find targets for attack by the V bomber force that would follow. As development progressed it became clear that the radar would not need as big an antenna as initially believed, freeing up considerable internal room. In response, the RAF started concentrating on the secondary bombing role carrying both the radar and also including a long bomb bay for either a weapon or additional fuel. A high-speed bomber requirement was also being studied at the time, OR.336, so the two projects were combined into the new RB.156 requirement. This led to a fairly major redesign.
Although the new version looked much like the original, it was larger overall and featured a new wing planform. In order to increase wing area extra "winglettes" were added outside of the engine pods and the entire planform was re-shaped to be more of a classic delta wing. The wing inside the engine pods, about ⅔ of the overall span, was swept at about 45°, the smaller area outside was more highly swept at about 60°. The forward sweep on the trailing edge was removed. The engine pods were now specified to carry four Armstrong-Siddeley P.176 engines each, for a total of eight. The pods were circular at the front and mounted a single large shock cone, and grew progressively more "square" to the rear, where they ended flush with the rear of the wing. The rest of the layout was generally the same as the earlier version, with the rectangular canards, "hidden" cockpit and large cropped-delta vertical fin at the extreme rear.
The new version also had reduction in crew to two members. The bomb bay was narrow but very long at 50 ft (15 m), and was intended to be armed with a nuclear-tipped stand-off missile. A suitable warhead started development as Blue Rosette.

So, here is my version made on Google sketch up.
avro 730 1.png
avro 730 2.png
avro 730 3.png
avro 730 4.png
avro 730 5.png
avro 730 6.png
avro 730 7.png

It is not 100% accurate, but I hope you'll agree with me that it is an awesome plane and it should be turned into a speed build kit.
 
#8
Avro 730 - Skylon Space Plane

Have you seen the striking similarity of the Skylon and the Avro 730? http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/space_skylon.html I noticed it a few years back and asked a local guy who has ties to the project if the Avro 730 was their inspiration. Never did get a good answer but it seems pretty obvious to me. The Skylon is just scaled up to over 50 tons, empty and is a single stage to orbit design. Testing seems to be moving forward with their Reaction Engines. If they have plans for a SSTO with this design, imagine what it could have done as a jet in the 50's, 60's and beyond.

Avro 730 Model
This is the Avro 730.
View attachment 18551
The Avro 730 was a planned Mach 3 reconnaissance aircraft and bomber for the Royal Air Force. If it had proceeded into service, the aircraft would have replaced the V bombers as the primary delivery system for Britain's nuclear deterrent. It was cancelled in 1957 along with other development on manned aircraft as part of the 1957 Defence White Paper.
The Avro 730 was a tail-first aircraft, an approach which greatly reduced trim-drag while increasing lift at slower speeds. The aircraft had a long, thin fuselage with a high fineness ratio; a small tapered almost-rectangular wing was mounted centrally on the fuselage. Four Armstrong-Siddeley P.156 engines were carried, two each mounted over-under in pods at the extreme tips of the wings. No conventional canopy was fitted in order to maintain the fineness ratio, the cockpit featured only two small windows facing to the side, and used a retractable periscope for viewing during take-off and landing. A crew of three would be carried: pilot, navigator and radar operator.
This initial version was intended strictly for the reconnaissance role, using its "Red Drover" sideways-looking radar to find targets for attack by the V bomber force that would follow. As development progressed it became clear that the radar would not need as big an antenna as initially believed, freeing up considerable internal room. In response, the RAF started concentrating on the secondary bombing role carrying both the radar and also including a long bomb bay for either a weapon or additional fuel. A high-speed bomber requirement was also being studied at the time, OR.336, so the two projects were combined into the new RB.156 requirement. This led to a fairly major redesign.
Although the new version looked much like the original, it was larger overall and featured a new wing planform. In order to increase wing area extra "winglettes" were added outside of the engine pods and the entire planform was re-shaped to be more of a classic delta wing. The wing inside the engine pods, about ⅔ of the overall span, was swept at about 45°, the smaller area outside was more highly swept at about 60°. The forward sweep on the trailing edge was removed. The engine pods were now specified to carry four Armstrong-Siddeley P.176 engines each, for a total of eight. The pods were circular at the front and mounted a single large shock cone, and grew progressively more "square" to the rear, where they ended flush with the rear of the wing. The rest of the layout was generally the same as the earlier version, with the rectangular canards, "hidden" cockpit and large cropped-delta vertical fin at the extreme rear.
The new version also had reduction in crew to two members. The bomb bay was narrow but very long at 50 ft (15 m), and was intended to be armed with a nuclear-tipped stand-off missile. A suitable warhead started development as Blue Rosette.

So, here is my version made on Google sketch up.
View attachment 18552
View attachment 18553
View attachment 18554
View attachment 18555
View attachment 18556
View attachment 18557
View attachment 18558

It is not 100% accurate, but I hope you'll agree with me that it is an awesome plane and it should be turned into a speed build kit.
 
#9
Burnelli Lifting Fuselage

I wanted to add to the Lifting Body or Lifting Fuselage posts. In 2008 I built and flew a 30" RC of Burnelli's last design before his death in 1964, the GB-888A. It was to be a supersonic airliner. It flew very well and I pretty much didn't have a clue what I was doing. Still don't but I keep trying. I'm working on super and hypersonic designs. Attached is the 2008 model after its maiden flight. Now, a little more damaged but still in one piece.

Some put Burnelli down and say his designs were draggy and slow but check out what a NASA, Sr. Aeronautical Engineer has to say in a 2001 AIAA paper. http://www.meridian-int-res.com/Aeronautics/Burnelli_AIAA.pdf He used the phrase 'strikingly similar' when comparing Burnelli's '64 design to NASA's X-43B hypersonic design. I'm now in the middle of making a 4 foot, 4 ducted fan model that will hopefully be finished by September. I'm workin' on it.
 

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