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First Airplane Design!(Cessna 182)

#1
Hello people of the world! I recently started designing a Cessna 182 foam board plane on fusion 360. This is the first plane I started designing. So, I would like some tips for making the plans( I am planning on making it public). It is a pretty complicated design as I took inspiration from Flite Test's Cessna 150. I do need some help with things like a steerable front wheel (a more DIY approach would be appreciated). Any help would be appreciated.
Thank You
Laughingthrush
 

mach1 rc

Well-known member
#2
Welcome to the forums😁 I don't know much about fusion 360 but if you used inkscape I could help a lot better. About the steerable nose wheel I've never done that but if you were willing to just use rudder that would work to some degree.
 
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Grifflyer

WWII fanatic
#3
What are you having problems with specifically? I don't use fusion 360 to design planes, I just use it for 3D printed parts. I might be able to help you out a little bit.
 

speedbirdted

Well-known member
#4
Hello people of the world! I recently started designing a Cessna 182 foam board plane on fusion 360. This is the first plane I started designing. So, I would like some tips for making the plans( I am planning on making it public). It is a pretty complicated design as I took inspiration from Flite Test's Cessna 150. I do need some help with things like a steerable front wheel (a more DIY approach would be appreciated). Any help would be appreciated.
Thank You
Laughingthrush
Welcome to the forums. Inkscape and adobe illustrator are great tools to use when designing plans as almost all laser cutters will read an SVG file. I've modeled airplanes in Fusion 360 but didn't directly produce the plans for that, always taking the measurements and creating the actual cut paths in Inkscape (which I know is inefficient but I suck at using technology)

A crude but effective way to make a steerable nosewheel that I have used is make a B-fold but the area of foam that is cut out is equivalent to twice the thickness of the foam (I know there's a name for this) plus a few millimeters. Then you can run a straw or another tube about the same diameter as your nosewheel strut wire underneath the paper atop the joint, and put linkage stoppers above and below the tube on the wire. You can add a spring at the bottom in between the straw and linkage stopper to create a crappy oleo like suspension system. I know this is a garbage explanation and if it's too hard to understand I might be able to provide a picture if I still have any planes that use it.