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Flute test power pack c battery

#1
So I bought a gens ace 2200 mAh 60c 3s LiPo and a flite test power pack c I’m new to the hobby and was wondering if this battery will blow out the esc due to the quarantine it would be a hassle to return the battery. Thanks
 

FDS

Well-known member
#4
Remember the battery doesn’t “push” current to the motor. The motor draws current from the battery, which varies according to the load put upon it, up to the motors stated maximum (stall) current. You could plug the ESC and motor into a nuclear power plant and it would draw the same current. You might have to step the power plants voltage down a bit!
The things to look out for with batteries are getting the right voltage, for example if the ESC is 4s max, don’t put 6s in there and having sufficient current output to meet the motor load. For example if your motor chart says with a 6x4 prop you draw 12A then you would want at least a 20c 1000mah lipo to meet that and allow “headroom” so you don’t hammer the battery. As a rule of thumb more C rating = more better. Even if you only need 20c a better rating will give you lower internal resistance and the battery will perform better as a result.
C rating is a function of battery capacity, so it’s more important to get higher ratings in smaller sizes or on bigger motors.
 
#5
So I bought a gens ace 2200 mAh 60c 3s LiPo and a flite test power pack c I’m new to the hobby and was wondering if this battery will blow out the esc due to the quarantine it would be a hassle to return the battery. Thanks
thank you all i came from the RC car hobby and didn't really pay attention to c ratings on batteries with cars, this is my first foam board plane and i really don't want to screw it up
 

Merv

Well-known member
#6
I agree with @FDS, the Amp ratings on batteries, ESC & motors is the not to exceed rating.

The formula for batteries is mAh/1000 x C = Amps, so your battery can deliver 132A (2,200/1000x60). So long as the load does not exceed 132A for an extended time you will be fine. Some batteries have 2 C ratings, the higher one is the burst rating and the lower one is the extended load rating. The burst rating is what it can stand for a short time, maybe 5-10 seconds. Always use the lower C rating for extended use.

Everything is based on the prop. Bigger prop draw more amps and spinning faster draws more amps. Higher Kv motors spin faster therefore use smaller props. Higher volts spin faster therefore use smaller prop. If your prop is too big or too fast you will exceed the amp ratings. Whichever component is the weakest link will go first, the battery, the ECS or the motor.