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Flying In The Wind

fliteadmin

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
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#1

No trip to LA would be complete without the opportunity to bask in the glow of celebrity. In this week's Flite Tip, our boys get a chance to hang out with a star from The Lost Boys, Corey Feldman. A high wind advisory couldn't keep Josh grounded, and in this episode he shares advice for flying in the wind. It is evident though that Corey and Josh differ somewhat in their definitions for "Flying in the Wind", but both techniques promise some excitement. The F6F performs well in these adverse conditions, and Josh Scott contributes to the discussion with tips on control throws and managing airspace. This Hollywood story has a happy ending, and Corey gets to go home with a Hobby King F6F Hellcat. Be sure to watch until the end as Josh Bixler does his best imitation of Dancing with the Stars.



 
#2
I was flying mye AXN today and it was a bit windy out there. I have only flied for a couple days and i'am kinda new to rc planes, it didnt end well, I broke my elevator :(
Im only 15 years old and do not have alot of money to buy a equipment to fix it :(
But I learned alot of you guys!!
 

MCurrie

Junior Member
#3
Windy Day

I always make my planes out of 2$ foam core, and packing take, so the entire fuselage is only worth about 5$, and the whole plane is worth about 90$.

I had an experience flying in high wind, I was flying through a football goal post, and a large gust of wind came and I pretty much totaled my plane> Just build a new one in a couple of hours.

I tend to lower the throttle coming out of the wind, and raising is before I turn into the wind, works best for me.

You could probably fix your elevator with a bit of glue and tape. Other small parts would be under 1$, so you can keep a low budget.:)
 

Hamdhan

The Expert Newbie
#6
Here in Kenya, the only flight ground I can access is my school field, it is well...near the Indian Ocean so, as you'd expect, VERY WINDY! But I carry most tests in a giant hall.
 

jemlin8

British Pilot
#8
I find the best way to fly in the wind is to constantly adjust your trims.. I had a time when I was flying a small R.C plane and it flew straight over someone's hedge. Lesson learned, don't underestimate mother nature!
 
#9
I was flying mye AXN today and it was a bit windy out there. I have only flied for a couple days and i'am kinda new to rc planes, it didnt end well, I broke my elevator :(
Im only 15 years old and do not have alot of money to buy a equipment to fix it :(
But I learned alot of you guys!!
The AXN elevator seems to brake very easy. Mine has be hot glued many times and now has reinforced tape on it. Works and see no difference in flying. Can buy replacement from HobbyKing very cheap.
 

Ak Flyer

Fly the wings off
Mentor
#10
I find the best way to fly in the wind is to constantly adjust your trims.. I had a time when I was flying a small R.C plane and it flew straight over someone's hedge. Lesson learned, don't underestimate mother nature!
I suppose it depends on what type of plane and what type of flying you are doing but I would have to disagree. When I fly in the wind there's too much going on to take my hands off the sticks. In the wind the effect on the plane changes up wind to down and different from a cross wind. If I take my trims out of adjustement then as soon as I turn into the wind I have to change it back.

My suggestion is if you have the capability in your radio to turn up the expos. This numbs the center of the stick and makes it easier to make small corrections. Some will recommend turning to low rates, but that only helps facing into the wind but when you have a tail wind, you need more throw instead of less.

So unless you want to spend all your time changing switch positions, turn up the expos, keep your thumbs on the sticks and have a good time.

Here's me flying my Hobbyking Hawk 3D in the wind. I love flying this plane in the wind.
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#11
I agree. While flying in the wind, you need constant control of the sticks. No hands-off. But if flying FPV in a crosswind, and not going to turn around soon, it might be easier with trim.
 

ananas1301

Crazy flyer/crasher :D
#12
Yeah colorex´s is right.

Also the video there is great! I can´t imagine myself flying like that! Those F3P planes are not beginner planes and very twitchy if you don´t set them up correctly, which I suppose he did in the vid.

Looks like fun though :D
 

Ak Flyer

Fly the wings off
Mentor
#13
Thank you. It's a lot of fun to fly. I wish I could say that there is a precise setup involved, but that plane is so hammered and flimsy that setup is kind of a waste of time. I have literally broken the nose completely off that plane over 10 times. I have broken it in half. The reason I love that plane is that it's tough but also so easy to repair. I will fly it when it's too rough for anything else. I would fly that plane in a tornado just to see what would happen. Total confidence builder knowing that you really can't screw it up all that bad. However, it's a flimsy plane and just not that precise of a flyer. All the setup is sort of an estimate holding your thumb up to it lol. Great, fun plane though. You may notice that my elevator was far too touchy still and that was giving me the most trouble.
 

BigDon

Junior Member
#14
Being in Scotland, we have little choice but to learn how to fly in the wind...and the one thing you learn quick is that there's no fixed set of rules and it can all change depending on the plane in the air, direction of the wind, wind speed, is it gusting or constant and what effect is the terrain etc around your field have on things.

Our flying field sits at the end of a Glen (valley) that runs South West to North East which means that the predominant wind funnels straight up the Glen towards us most of the time. However, if you get the wind coming in over the hills then you get all kinds of strange stuff going on and wind speed/direction is changing constantly...as well as creating down drafts and up drafts. You then have to factor in the trees and if the wind is coming over them it can be calm on the ground and BAM you get hit once above the trees.....and then, when landing the approach can be in to a nice stiff head wind, drop below the trees and you lose it, making it impossible to float a plane in on the breeze.

If nothing else it keeps you on your toes and makes flying a bit more fun!!!
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#15
I'm with you there, BigDon! Flying in the wind is a very interesting experience! I've only flown my Bixler once, and I did the maiden on a windy day, so I was very tense! But now I know what to expect, so next time should be very OK with the wind!
 

Ak Flyer

Fly the wings off
Mentor
#16
Agreed. Fact is that if you are going to fly you better get used to flying in the wind. Whether R/C or real, wind is a factor in flying. I actually prefer a light wind to dead calm. Keeps the bugs away lol. Gusting wind is challenging but so is wind coming over trees like Big Don said. It's also part of what keeps things fun and interesting. Maiden flights are best kept to calm days but once you're used to a plane you best learn to fly it in the wind.
 

Techno

Sunny Day Park Flyer
#18
I have only flown once, it ended in a tree. All other attempts have been crashes on takeoff because my plane is a huge hand launch glider
 
#19
I live in an area where the wind almost never blows, and when it does blow its followed by a thunderstorm.
But If I found myself in a area where the wind never stops, I would find a slope and abuse it..