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For a newbie, which videos must I absolutely watch before building?

#1
Hey folks,

Just got a Storch last week, and still sitting in the box waiting to be built. Partly due to lack of time (business owner and 2 kids at home), lack of all tools required, and the good old "paralysis analysis". I see there's tons of videos just on gluing foam with hot glue. Yikes is it that hard? And is there something I must know BEFORE I pop open the box and start building away?

So with that in mind, which videos are essential to watch before I build? That cover the basics such as hot gluing, cutting, scoring, folding, etc etc. My goal is to finally get started on this thing this weekend (note I said "get started"...not sure how many weeks this will take, lol!)
 

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#2
Hey folks,

Just got a Storch last week, and still sitting in the box waiting to be built. Partly due to lack of time (business owner and 2 kids at home), lack of all tools required, and the good old "paralysis analysis". I see there's tons of videos just on gluing foam with hot glue. Yikes is it that hard? And is there something I must know BEFORE I pop open the box and start building away?

So with that in mind, which videos are essential to watch before I build? That cover the basics such as hot gluing, cutting, scoring, folding, etc etc. My goal is to finally get started on this thing this weekend (note I said "get started"...not sure how many weeks this will take, lol!)
Why not get a sheet of foamboard and practice bevel cutting, A & B joins, scoring etc. so you can get comfortable before 'attacking' the speedbuild kit?
 
#4
I would recommend watching the beginning of the Storch build video, then build the power pod from the power pod build video which will give tips on how to build with foamboard.
 
#5
OK, and another topic...the power pod. I was under the impression the Storch kit had everything needed to build and fly (apart from tx, power pack). So in addition to building the basic fuselage and surfaces I also need to build a power pod? That's a separate kit in itself? I thought the power pod was just a convenient way to swap out electronics for different planes but I guess it's a core feature.
 

foamtest

Toothpick glider kid
#7
I believe that the foam board and the wooden firewall come with the speed build kit so you can build the power pod before you get the electronics if you want. I would highly recommend watching the storch build video and take notes of the parts that are tricky, or that seem tricky to you. And for folds an A fold means that the side plate goes above the bottom plate like this
fta.PNG
And for a B fold the side plate goes beside the bottom plate like this
attachment_1359096912942.jpg

Ft also made a general help video a while back for speed building

I would also recommend to trace out your kit on another sheet of foam board and build with that. I forgot to do that with my first speed build kit and I regretted it when I retired the old one and wanted to make another.

I hope this helped!
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#8
I would suggest getting a pack of poster board at the dollar store and tracing the speed built parts.

Its easy to store and you always have the patterns to make replacement parts or a whole new plane when ever you want.

I do the same with printed plans.

20180805_191616.jpg

All the patterns for the FT Edge 540 all glued and cut on poster board.

20180806_171452.jpg

As for videos to watch look at the beginner series as suggested and watch as many builds as you can.

Then try like was suggested on scrap foam or waste a sheet to practice making folds and joints.

Pay attention and practice wiping glue off. I go back and reinforce every joint with the run a bead and wipe the excess trick. It makes it stronger, neater, and most cases lighter with out clumps of glue.
 

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#9
I would suggest getting a pack of poster board at the dollar store and tracing the speed built parts.

Its easy to store and you always have the patterns to make replacement parts or a whole new plane when ever you want.

I do the same with printed plans.

View attachment 115005

All the patterns for the FT Edge 540 all glued and cut on poster board.

View attachment 115006

As for videos to watch look at the beginner series as suggested and watch as many builds as you can.

Then try like was suggested on scrap foam or waste a sheet to practice making folds and joints.

Pay attention and practice wiping glue off. I go back and reinforce every joint with the run a bead and wipe the excess trick. It makes it stronger, neater, and most cases lighter with out clumps of glue.
Gratuitous toe shots!!! ;)
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#10
OK, and another topic...the power pod. I was under the impression the Storch kit had everything needed to build and fly (apart from tx, power pack). So in addition to building the basic fuselage and surfaces I also need to build a power pod? That's a separate kit in itself? I thought the power pod was just a convenient way to swap out electronics for different planes but I guess it's a core feature.
Don't freak out, power pods are included in the kit. :) What I would recommend, before you even start cutting anything out - watch the entire Storch video first. There's a couple of reasons for this:

1) You may find that there are some tools you'll need that you don't have already. I went to go build the Sea Duck, and I didn't have a servo tester/centering tool; I had to delay my build by a week while waiting for one to come in because, if I hadn't, the servos for the elevator would have been off and I couldn't get to it without doing some "minor surgery". I also found out that a metal ruler, while not NECESSARY, is a REALLY nice thing to have when you have to push a long fold or join together and you don't want to burn your fingers from the glue. The metal rulers tend to disperse heat nicely and smoothly. :)

2) You can learn the techniques needed for working the bevels. I screwed up the edge of the wings on my Sea Duck, but I was able to salvage it with some tape, and now the plane flies smoothly. :) However, rather than messing up the edges on your speed build kit, you can practice on a $1 piece of foamboard from Dollar Tree.

3) Watching all the way through, you can see certain techniques that get applied and re-applied throughout the build, and you'll have a better idea of how things go together when you sit down to actually build it. It also helps to have a screen in front of you with the build video pulled up, so you can stop and start at various locations.
 

foamtest

Toothpick glider kid
#12
1) You may find that there are some tools you'll need that you don't have already. I went to go build the Sea Duck, and I didn't have a servo tester/centering tool; I had to delay my build by a week while waiting for one to come in because, if I hadn't, the servos for the elevator would have been off and I couldn't get to it without doing some "minor surgery".
Just a little tip for centering servos, you can use your transmitter and receiver to center servos its just a lot more work than a servo tester, you just have to make sure that you don't have any trim on whatever channel you plug the servo into.
 

kilroy07

Well-known member
#13
For an absolute beginner I keep going back to the FT Flyer. Yes, it's nothing to look at but it's pretty hard not to be successful at getting it to buzz around... Give you something to practice cutting/folding on before you tackle the storch. It's just a single piece of foamboard. Then I might even suggest the Tiny Trainer (I think it'll fit on 2 sheets.) it's a more complex build, if you get it flying the storch should be a breeze.

Good luck and welcome!
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#15
Watch the Storch video...watch it multiple times if you want. Honestly, before any build I watch the build video all the way through before doing anything. Like I will literally sit and watch it if I got some time to kill, on the john, etc. Just to get an idea of what I'm going to be up against. I've built a fair number of models so I would say I'm pretty familiar with their techniques but I still watch it in case there are any surprises (ex: putting piece A together first b/c it makes dealing with piece B easier...etc).

The Storch was one of their early designs so I'm pretty sure the video gives you a good foundation on the techniques, types of folds, etc. I am with CarolineTyler in that maybe you should try practicing on some scrap foam first before doing the speed build.

Some other early build videos you can check out: Tiny Trainer, Nutball, F22, FT Flyer, Old Fogey... You might also check out the Flitetest Beginner Series videos too.

Tools of the trade...
-sharp razor blades...they will dull the more you cut, so you may go through a few of them on a build. If the paper begins to crinkle as you cut, then it's time for a new blade
-Hot glue and hot glue gun...just make sure it's a decent size one that can take the big thick sticks. I wouldn't recommend the little crafty glue guns. For long glue runs (which the wing is a good place for this), make sure you got some big sticks on hand. Think mine's a slightly older model, but this is the one I use:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/AdTech-Hi-Temp-Full-Size-Hot-Glue-Gun/17404364

-packing tape
-screw driver (for servos, mounting motor, etc)
-needle nose pliers
-Wire cutters
-sanding block...this is optional
-90 degree triangle...OR you can always use any included 90 degree foamboard triangle from your kit too. Actually anything 90 degrees will work. Sometimes I've grabbed pieces of wood, a book edge, etc if I needed something 90 degrees in a pinch. When you are gluing pieces together, sometimes you need something 90 degrees so that it stays true.

The speed build kit will basically include everything you need EXCEPT electronics. So your power pod is there, but you need an electronic power pack which contains the motor, ESC, and servos. I normally buy all my parts separate BUT for starters you can pick out the appropriate power pack as it will include almost all the electronics you need.

You will also need to pick out your radio transmitter/receiver. We can cross the bridge when you get there though.

I'd say I've typed enough for you lol. It's a lot to take in, but it's a lot of fun once you get into it. Take your time with the build and ask questions as they come up. The Storch, IMO, is a great plane.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#16
Just a little tip for centering servos, you can use your transmitter and receiver to center servos its just a lot more work than a servo tester, you just have to make sure that you don't have any trim on whatever channel you plug the servo into.
LOL I know that now, but at the time, I thought, "Well, I'm gonna have to buy a servo tester," so off to Amazon I went. :) And in retrospect, I'm glad I did; it's become SO much easier than binding a receiver (because I'm putting it "new" into a new plane, I've always got a receiver for that particular plane, even if it's coming out of an old plane that crashed), having to run wiring, possibly connect a servo joiner, etc.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#17
Tools of the trade...
-sharp razor blades...they will dull the more you cut, so you may go through a few of them on a build. If the paper begins to crinkle as you cut, then it's time for a new blade
I'm going to mention that it helps to have two types of razor blade knives - a Utility knife, aka a boxcutter, where the blade slides into the handle; watching the videos, you'll see Josh use this type a lot.

I ALSO recommend an Exacto knife. I use this to cut the notches/small rectangular holes, because the bigger utility knife tends to over-cut when trying to get some of the smaller cuts to go all the way through the paper. I also use this when I'm cutting a curved edge, like say, the rounding of a wingtip, or the ends of a power pod. It's just easier to have one of these and some spare blades on hand for more precise work than the bigger blade of the utility knife.