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FT Flyer, Meet Pole.

#2
those pole can jump out right in front of you :) I've had that happen a few times myself. Once hit one dead on with a bonsai wing going full throttle(guessing around 50-60mph). It was spectacular. I just built an FT Flyer last weekend using the same motor/prop as you. On 2s it's overpowered 3s looks like a hoot.
 
#3
It's repaired already. I cut out the damaged section and put in a patch.
Yes, I love it. The only down side is the heavier than design battery. The landing gear can't take it with anything less than a perfect landing.
 

Foam Addict

Squirrel member
#5
I have hit two power poles and a power line within the past four weeks after a previously spotless record of flights.
The first was a 95 mph Stryker that hit the pole at a good clip and made confetti.
Next was my brother's super cub, and then it was a 48" blubaby. The motor shaft got stuck in a wooden pole. It was an interesting climb.
 
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#7
The motor shaft got stuck in a wooden pole.

Ouch.

To be honest, I had been flying too low for my skill level and was asking for it. I didn't expect to hit THAT pole though.
 
#10
What you are failing to realize, is that due to any slender vertical object's orthogonal orientation to the earth, and the incredibly powerful magnetic molten core, the vertical objects amplify and channel gravitational forces, regardless of what material they are made of, be it wood, steel, or otherwise. The gravitational forces are particularly powerful when confronted with materials such as foam and balsa. While it is true that these materials are of quite low density, the particular gravitational energy associated with items protruding vertically from the surface of the earth is able to magnify the attraction of foam and balsa. At this point, even our most brilliant physicists have failed to truly explain this phenomenon. It's similar to two rare earth magnets in close proximity. At a certain distance, there is almost nothing you can do keep the foam and or balsa away from the vertically oriented object. This is a phenomenon I observed many times as a boy, flying RC planes. Until my first couple of flights with my Old Fogey, I had nearly forgotten about these anomalous attractive forces. I think it was about my third flight when I was quickly reminded! Fortunately, a little packing tape was able to fix the wing that contacted the light pole. With my nicer planes, not wanting to tempt fate, I try to stay as far as possible from any vertical objects protruding from the ground.

Also little known to nearly anyone but RC fliers is the hatred for RC planes that coniferous and deciduous trees posses. Many think of trees as more or less inanimate objects, but their malice for RC planes, combined with the above gravitational phenomenon, make them powerful enemies of RC fliers everywhere!!!
 
#11
What you are failing to realize, is that due to any slender vertical object's orthogonal orientation to the earth, and the incredibly powerful magnetic molten core, the vertical objects amplify and channel gravitational forces, regardless of what material they are made of, be it wood, steel, or otherwise. The gravitational forces are particularly powerful when confronted with materials such as foam and balsa. While it is true that these materials are of quite low density, the particular gravitational energy associated with items protruding vertically from the surface of the earth is able to magnify the attraction of foam and balsa. At this point, even our most brilliant physicists have failed to truly explain this phenomenon. It's similar to two rare earth magnets in close proximity. At a certain distance, there is almost nothing you can do keep the foam and or balsa away from the vertically oriented object. This is a phenomenon I observed many times as a boy, flying RC planes. Until my first couple of flights with my Old Fogey, I had nearly forgotten about these anomalous attractive forces. I think it was about my third flight when I was quickly reminded! Fortunately, a little packing tape was able to fix the wing that contacted the light pole. With my nicer planes, not wanting to tempt fate, I try to stay as far as possible from any vertical objects protruding from the ground.

Also little known to nearly anyone but RC fliers is the hatred for RC planes that coniferous and deciduous trees posses. Many think of trees as more or less inanimate objects, but their malice for RC planes, combined with the above gravitational phenomenon, make them powerful enemies of RC fliers everywhere!!!
Nice.

And since the trajectory of the given foam and metal object was in a generally easterly direction at a somewhat moderate speed when it impacted the aforementioned vertical object, this would result in compelling an increase of the rotational speed of said planetary body causing a slight decrease in the duration of solar arc. I sincerely apologize to pilots of remotely controlled aircraft for the reduction of available daylight for their preferred hobby. I therefore promise to impact said vertically oriented object in a westerly direction in the near future. In addition, to make full amends, I swear to crash twice, therefore extending possibilities for future enjoyment.
 

Ak Flyer

Fly the wings off
Mentor
#12
What you are failing to realize, is that due to any slender vertical object's orthogonal orientation to the earth, and the incredibly powerful magnetic molten core, the vertical objects amplify and channel gravitational forces, regardless of what material they are made of, be it wood, steel, or otherwise. The gravitational forces are particularly powerful when confronted with materials such as foam and balsa. While it is true that these materials are of quite low density, the particular gravitational energy associated with items protruding vertically from the surface of the earth is able to magnify the attraction of foam and balsa. At this point, even our most brilliant physicists have failed to truly explain this phenomenon. It's similar to two rare earth magnets in close proximity. At a certain distance, there is almost nothing you can do keep the foam and or balsa away from the vertically oriented object. This is a phenomenon I observed many times as a boy, flying RC planes. Until my first couple of flights with my Old Fogey, I had nearly forgotten about these anomalous attractive forces. I think it was about my third flight when I was quickly reminded! Fortunately, a little packing tape was able to fix the wing that contacted the light pole. With my nicer planes, not wanting to tempt fate, I try to stay as far as possible from any vertical objects protruding from the ground.

Also little known to nearly anyone but RC fliers is the hatred for RC planes that coniferous and deciduous trees posses. Many think of trees as more or less inanimate objects, but their malice for RC planes, combined with the above gravitational phenomenon, make them powerful enemies of RC fliers everywhere!!!
Since you have such a handle on that, could you help me with another?
What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?
 
#15
Darn those vertical poles! I've had soccer nets sidestep 3-4 feet or grow hooks to catch my plane as I flew through (kidding of course). Lol.

Glad to hear it wasn't too difficult to get back in the air. Nice flying the rest of the time.

Cheers!
Randall