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FT Old Fogey (Swappable)

fliteadmin

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#1

The FT Old Fogey (Old Timer) is another scratch build foam board airplane designed with the swappable fuselage.

old fogey 1.jpg

This is a 3 channel RC airplane with only elevator and rudder. Designed to be a fun, easy flyer.

old fogey - 5.jpg old fogey - 2.jpg

The wing design features an under cambered polyhedral wing allowing the plane to flown practically hands off.

old fogey - 78.jpg

When building your Old Fogey, you don't want too much polyhedral or your plane can 'dutch roll' (rock left and right.)

old fogey - 7.jpg

The Old Fogey foam board scratch build is comparable to the FT Flyer and Nutball planes in the swappable series.
Great for easy outdoor flying and indoor flying.

old fogey - 4.jpg old fogey - 6.jpg

This 'old timer' style plane offers a unique flying experience as well as a classic look.


Stay tuned for the build video on this foam board rc plane!

old fogey - 8.jpg old fogey - 3.jpg

Battery mentioned in this episode:

Turnigy 500mAh 3S 20C Lipo Pack
 
#2
NITE FLYER!!!

Do I stop the Baby Blender I just started or do I start this one? hmmmmmmm

Hope the plans also show the floats.
 

Foam Addict

Squirrel member
#3
Nice vid!
But if I'm not mistaken, dutch roll is a tail wag, exhibited in swept winged aircraft.
I could be wrong, but...Dutch roll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_roll
 
#4
Dutch Roll is caused by over stability in the dihedral. The wing rocks and wants to level itself but with too much dihedral the wing levels before the tail can get back to neutral which makes the wing roll because of the input from the tail which then yaws over because of the now banked wing which then rights itself while the tail is off center causing the problem all over again. Her's a quick youtube animation showing it


Doesn't matter what type of airplane you're flying it's just a matter of balance between roll and yaw stability. Humans, it turns out, are a little less affected by roll instability then yaw. We tip our heads easily but being shaken from side to side, not so good.

On old Free Flight planes you'll see great big verticals on the tail trying to overcome the Dutch Roll being caused by too much dihedral.
 
#5
Hey Chad or Josh, roughly how many sheets of foam board are needed to build this. I'm going to be in the neighborhood of a dollar tree today and want to start building this tomorrow when the plans are (hopefully) released. I'm trying to get this built before this weekend's Holiday Electric Fly in Geneva. :)
 

Foam Addict

Squirrel member
#6
Thanks clean, Sorry Guys!:black_eyed:
By the way, are you going to include the float plans in the build?
 
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#8
Hey Chad or Josh, roughly how many sheets of foam board are needed to build this. I'm going to be in the neighborhood of a dollar tree today and want to start building this tomorrow when the plans are (hopefully) released. I'm trying to get this built before this weekend's Holiday Electric Fly in Geneva. :)
It only takes 2 sheets of DT foam board. If you have not built your pod yet, You may want to buy 3. Can't wait to see you at Geneva! We will be flying the Old Fogey and other "swappables" too!

JB
 

nazir

Junior Member
#15
thanks....the weight is lesser perhaps because we in India do not get the same Adams foam....the foam I got is is only 4 mm thick...i think yours is 3/16 inch which is approx 4.7 mm
 
#16
Old Fogey.jpg Sweedish friend.jpg
I had a little trouble getting my wingtips even on the hotel floor by myself, so I made my own "Swedish friend" when I got home. I just marked the angle on a piece of scrap by running a pen along the first side wingtip. Then cut a slot in another scrap to hold it vertical and stuck a skewer in the vertical piece to make a stop. I then lightly clamped the center section to the table at the Popsicle stick and glued the second tip on using the guide. The second tip ended up within 1/16" of the first.