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FTFC20 Bellanca 28-92 Trimotor designed by HardWork

cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#41
Wings glued with the required dihedral
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I covered the wings with paper and wheatpaste just like with my homemade foamboard. The result is incredibly light and strong. It would have been better if I had applied putty before covering, but I was afraid of adding too much weight.
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cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#42
Yesterday I was working on spinners, so far they look good, after the maiden flight I will build some false spinning props.
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I've also been working a little on the fuselage. This is the most delicate part because I need to fit all the electronics carefully in such a narrow space. That's why I decided that the entire top of the fuselage will be detachable, including the cowl and cockpit.
Removing the top part.
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The new top part made from a 3mm foam sheet.
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The fuselage is assembled from the middle of the wing backwards. The only thing left to do is to mount the rudder. I will mount the horizontal stabilizer when the wings are glued, to ensure that everything is aligned correctly.
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cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#43
As I had suspected, the fuselage is so narrow that I had to remove part of the wing to accommodate the battery. Luckily, the wing did not lose strength in the surgery and remains stable. :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
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The fuselage is almost complete.
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The closing mechanism of the upper hatch
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cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#44
Everything is assembled, the fuselage totally glued to the wings. I could have tried to make the wings detachable but the contact zone between the wings and the fuselage is too weak to fix a mounting mechanism there. You only need to glue the stabilizer, but I will do after lining the fuselage with paper, to ensure that everything is properly aligned.
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He's getting close to the original model.
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This is the approximation of the desired positions for electronics.
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But the reality is different, I had to move the battery forward considerably to get a proper balance. I still need to finish the model to really estimate the final position of the battery, but at least it gives me an idea.
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The engine mount has been a challenge, but it's ready. The ESC would have a great airflow in its favor.
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cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#45
Before gluing the front section of the fuselage
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Motor mount tamplate. Look how close is the motor mount to the fuselaje edge o_Oo_Oo_O
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Working on the pilot figurine, not bod to be the first try. :cool:
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cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#47
To get the right balance on the CG, I had to move the battery forward against the initial plans. I still need to finish the model, but I have an idea of where the battery is going to be.
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I would try my best not to add extra weight.
 

cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#49
I need help!!!!!!! :sick:
please, as you see the intake is quite big, which would allow a smooth air intake to cool both the engine and ESC. But I have no idea where to put the air outlet without ruining the aesthetics of the model.
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The original model comes with exhaust pipes on both sides of the fuselage and on each wing engine. I plan to do the same with small hollow tubes that will allow air to escape, but I don't think it would be enough.
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Any ideas????? please!!!!!
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#51
I think if you open up all those little holes on the side it would probably be enough - especially if you give it time to cool fully between flights. Maybe on the first few flights only go for a minute or two and then feel for how hot the motor and ESC get as soon as you land. If you can hold your finger against it without needing to pull away, it's still an OK temperature.
 

cdfigueredo

Well-known member
#52
I think if you open up all those little holes on the side it would probably be enough - especially if you give it time to cool fully between flights. Maybe on the first few flights only go for a minute or two and then feel for how hot the motor and ESC get as soon as you land. If you can hold your finger against it without needing to pull away, it's still an OK temperature.
Oh, I think I'd try to get as many exhaust pipes as I can, keeping the scale. I'll do as you say. Also try to do the same in the workshop, keep the engine with the propeller on for about 1 min and check how hot it gets. Although the airflow would be lower, I think.
Thank you very much!!!!
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#53
Oh, I think I'd try to get as many exhaust pipes as I can, keeping the scale. I'll do as you say. Also try to do the same in the workshop, keep the engine with the propeller on for about 1 min and check how hot it gets. Although the airflow would be lower, I think.
Thank you very much!!!!
I would be cautious in extended running in the workshop, even with the propeller on - keep checking temperature frequently because as you say - airflow will be lower on the bench.