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Hot Glue temp?

Hot Glue gun temperature setting

  • High

    Votes: 3 100.0%
  • Low

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    3
#1
Hi folks,

Newbie, just glued my first Chuck Glider last night! Unboxed a 3 year cordless Adtech (DD was gonna use it on some sewing projects) and some Stanley glue they had at HomeDepot. I made my share of mistakes! But the smell of the glue and the foam made me wonder -- what temperature setting on the gun should I use, High or Low?

thanks,
Jab
 

mayan

Well-known member
#2
Most hot glue guns don’t have temps on them at least not the ones I have seen. But in case you have the option I think it would depend on what you wanted to glue. Low temp could be used for things that needed only a very small bit that way the glue doesn’t cool on you before you set a piece in place. Hot temp could work for large surfaces that needed to be covered giving you more time to set the piece in place before it cools down. But beware I think this might also effect the glue sticks that you use. Some might not work for the low or high temp.

The smell could mean it’s too hot.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#3
I also have a Adtech glue gun. Mine is a cheap corded one from Walmart. For me, the low temp setting was not hot enough, the glue would not stick well. The joints just didn’t have enough strength. When I switch to high, the glue would boil.

My solution, I put my glue gun on a dimmer switch. Now I can dial in what ever temp I want. I go for a temp that minimizes the drips from a sitting gun.
 

FoamyDM

Building Fool-Flying Noob
#4
Mine only has hot oven hot. (high temp gun)
Ambient room temp plays a big part in time to set. on the nights were AC is cranking and room temp is low 72°F. to cools quick. in the winter @ 78°F I have a noticeably longer time. especially on the thing glue beads.
 

Wildthing

Well-known member
#5
I also have a Adtech glue gun. Mine is a cheap corded one from Walmart. For me, the low temp setting was not hot enough, the glue would not stick well. The joints just didn’t have enough strength. When I switch to high, the glue would boil.

My solution, I put my glue gun on a dimmer switch. Now I can dial in what ever temp I want. I go for a temp that minimizes the drips from a sitting gun.
That's a heck of an idea, mine only has one temp. I plug and unplug it to keep me in my temp range because if I leave it plugged to reach full temp the glue will melt the foam.