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how do reveivers work?

#2
I'm sure someone with more knowledge will chime in shortly. It looks to me like you would want a Hitec radio to work with that receiver.

Is there a reason you need to work with that receiver specifically? I'm guessing because you already have it. What kind of flying do you do? I see the transmitter is used with the Blade, so micro quads as a guess. What kind of flying are you looking to do? (Whatcha building😁?)

The reason why I ask is that it may make sense to build up around that specific receiver, or it may make more sense to choose a transmitter to go with and build from there; depending on what you want to do.
 
#3
I'm sure someone with more knowledge will chime in shortly. It looks to me like you would want a Hitec radio to work with that receiver.

Is there a reason you need to work with that receiver specifically? I'm guessing because you already have it. What kind of flying do you do? I see the transmitter is used with the Blade, so micro quads as a guess. What kind of flying are you looking to do? (Whatcha building😁?)

The reason why I ask is that it may make sense to build up around that specific receiver, or it may make more sense to choose a transmitter to go with and build from there; depending on what you want to do.
you would be right I already bought it to use on a ft mighty mini scout only to discover it might not work with the rtf transmitter i got with my nano qx
 

FDS

Well-known member
#4
If you have a toy type TX from a quad or similar you are unlikely to be able to find a suitable receiver, the protocols they use are often unique to toys.
The other issue with those types of TX is lack of features like servo reversing, dual rates and expo that make setting up and flying your first plane much easier and successful.
You are going to have to buy a proper TX. What you buy is going to be up to you, but Flysky make a great TX for under $50 which often ships with a receiver included.
The transmitter you have is a DSMX product from Horizon Hobby. You may be able to bind it to a DSMX receiver like the Lemon RX6. However the problem of no user settable rates, end points, expo or servo reverse will still be with you.
If you want a TX that will work with your Horizon Hobby stuff and DSMX receivers then Hobbyking sell the Orange TX6I transmitter which works great with BNF planes, I have one for my Sport Cub and it does all my FT builds using Lemon RX receivers which are about $15 each.
The receiver you have is not compatible at all, it’s a totally different protocol.
Every manufacturer has their own receiver protocol, most sub $50 TX’s will only work with the same protocol. There are magic transmitters or modules that have nearly all the protocols on them, meaning you can fly anything with them, but they are more complex to set up and cost more.
 
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basslord1124

Well-known member
#5
The transmitter you have is basically a Spektrum transmitter so you would need to get a Spektrum compatible receiver. That's also a very short range transmitter so you can't fly real far with it. I would recommend either what @FDS suggested OR look at the full range Spektrum transmitters (DXE is the cheapest one you can get or look on the used market) and then get a Spektrum receiver. You can also get Spektrum compatible receivers like Lemon, Headsup, etc. These will be cheaper than Spektrum and still will work.
 
#6
The transmitter you have is basically a Spektrum transmitter so you would need to get a Spektrum compatible receiver. That's also a very short range transmitter so you can't fly real far with it. I would recommend either what @FDS suggested OR look at the full range Spektrum transmitters (DXE is the cheapest one you can get or look on the used market) and then get a Spektrum receiver. You can also get Spektrum compatible receivers like Lemon, Headsup, etc. These will be cheaper than Spektrum and still will work.
So if i buy a specktrum receiver that will work until I can upgrade?
 

FDS

Well-known member
#7
It might, but they are expensive. DSMX is the Spektrum protocol, lots of other cheaper DSMX receivers exist.
I wouldn’t guarantee that bind and again, you will need to set rates, end points and servo direction which you can’t do with that TX.
If one of your servos is reversed, which is fairly common, you won’t have any way to make the sticks be the right way round. Try flying a plane with say the elevator reversed, it’s not at all easy, neither is flying at 100% servo rate with no expo.
This TX will bind with your quad and is better than the DXE, because you can alter things on the fly without an app, this is the Lemon RX. Those are rock solid for range and reliability in my experience, plus very light and not expensive.
 
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Ketchup

4s mini mustang
#8
I would suggest investing in a decent transmitter (if you are sure that you will be sticking with this hobby of course). It would have the functions that @FDS mentioned, and it would also be the only transmitter that you will ever need.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#10
So...

RTF (ready to fly) units sold from Spektrum aren't really meant to bind to other units. It's kind of a "one shot, this unit only" type of situation. It *IS* possible to make it bind, to something else, but it's limited to only 4 channels.

What I would recommend is what others have suggested - purchase a Spektrum transmitter, or a DSMX programmable transmitter. The DXe transmitter is the cheapest one out there at $60, but it's pretty watered down in functionality. That said, you can have, in theory, an unlimited amount of models that you can bind to it; however, you can only bind one at a time and have to store the models in a computer or smartphone/tablet that you have to load to the DXe each time you want to change to a new aircraft. That's the major downside of this method. Upside of the radio, it's inexpensive, it has wireless trainer capabilities, and it's a 6 channel radio.

If you want to step up to something that can store models, either the DX6 or DX6e are better choices. However, they range from $150-$200, depending on the model. The DX6e lacks diversity antennas, which means that it's not as reliable in signal as the DX6 (but is usually still plenty of signal strength to cover an average baseball or soccer field), and it lacks voice alerts, which means it can't talk to you and tell you that you have a minute of flight time left. The pro for the DX6e is that it's $50 cheaper than the DX6.

Receivers for the Spektrum are just as inexpensive as the receiver you looked at. OrangeRX and Lemon RX tend to be about $15 each, and sometimes you can pick up OrangeRX DSMX 6 channel receivers from HobbyKing on sale (my dad got 5 for $25 about a year back). Actual Spektrum brand receivers seem to run about $25 and up, depending on how many channels you need (the new Sport receivers for 4 channel start at $30, but I've bought older 4 channel Spektrum branded receivers at my hobby shop for $25 before I found out about the Lemon and OrangeRX brands).

If you are going to go Spektrum, I'd point towards the DX6 - it's a well made receiver, the controls are solid, and the voice alerts speaking the time are a lot nicer than a couple of beeps that are warning you. And, the diversity signal strength is a nice bit of insurance against loss of signal. There ARE cheaper options in the Spektrum family, and if you really want to get dirt cheap, you can go with the DXe transmitter, but it won't allow you to expand outside of the Nano QX without jumping through hoops. Step up to the DX6e or DX6 - you won't be disappointed.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#11
Forgot to add - if you are using a Lemon or OrangeRX receiver, they don't have a "bind" button to bind them. They use a little plug that gets put into the "BIND" slot on the receiver. Once you've bound the receiver to your program in the transmitter, you remove the plug, and it stays bound. :) In some cases, though, you don't need to do that, because they might be set to go into a "ready to bind" process like some of the bind n' fly aircraft if you power on in a certain way (this is usually determined in the instructions of the aircraft).
 
#12
So...

RTF (ready to fly) units sold from Spektrum aren't really meant to bind to other units. It's kind of a "one shot, this unit only" type of situation. It *IS* possible to make it bind, to something else, but it's limited to only 4 channels.

What I would recommend is what others have suggested - purchase a Spektrum transmitter, or a DSMX programmable transmitter. The DXe transmitter is the cheapest one out there at $60, but it's pretty watered down in functionality. That said, you can have, in theory, an unlimited amount of models that you can bind to it; however, you can only bind one at a time and have to store the models in a computer or smartphone/tablet that you have to load to the DXe each time you want to change to a new aircraft. That's the major downside of this method. Upside of the radio, it's inexpensive, it has wireless trainer capabilities, and it's a 6 channel radio.

If you want to step up to something that can store models, either the DX6 or DX6e are better choices. However, they range from $150-$200, depending on the model. The DX6e lacks diversity antennas, which means that it's not as reliable in signal as the DX6 (but is usually still plenty of signal strength to cover an average baseball or soccer field), and it lacks voice alerts, which means it can't talk to you and tell you that you have a minute of flight time left. The pro for the DX6e is that it's $50 cheaper than the DX6.

Receivers for the Spektrum are just as inexpensive as the receiver you looked at. OrangeRX and Lemon RX tend to be about $15 each, and sometimes you can pick up OrangeRX DSMX 6 channel receivers from HobbyKing on sale (my dad got 5 for $25 about a year back). Actual Spektrum brand receivers seem to run about $25 and up, depending on how many channels you need (the new Sport receivers for 4 channel start at $30, but I've bought older 4 channel Spektrum branded receivers at my hobby shop for $25 before I found out about the Lemon and OrangeRX brands).

If you are going to go Spektrum, I'd point towards the DX6 - it's a well made receiver, the controls are solid, and the voice alerts speaking the time are a lot nicer than a couple of beeps that are warning you. And, the diversity signal strength is a nice bit of insurance against loss of signal. There ARE cheaper options in the Spektrum family, and if you really want to get dirt cheap, you can go with the DXe transmitter, but it won't allow you to expand outside of the Nano QX without jumping through hoops. Step up to the DX6e or DX6 - you won't be disappointed.
can you link my to one of these lemon/orange transmitters?
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#13
You do not have to have servo reversing years ago we never had it. You just have to mount the servo correctly when installing them so up elevator is up etc but it makes life so much easier having it.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#16
@deltajet3 I already linked them both just up the page. You can buy both brand new for less than the price of a second hand DX6e.
Do you mean the RECEIVERS, or TRANSMITTERS? I know there are transmitter MODULES that you can buy that will connect up to other radios like the FrSky transmitters, that will do DSM2/DSMX protocol, but they are increasing the cost of the transmitter up to something that would be at the same cost as buying a Spektrum transmitter. This is where I'm confused as to what you're recommending, especially since Lemon doesn't make receivers or transmitter modules that connect up to a transmitter.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#17
OP owns a DSMX quad, which they will want to bind to a new TX if they purchase one. They also have a new FT kit to build which will want a receiver to go with a DSMX capable TX.
Lemon make the best compromise DSMX transmitter with reliability, weight, ease of use and price combined. I linked that then went with the second best (but arguably easiest to set up) sub $80 DSMX capable TX, the ORX TX6I.
Of course modules with other radios are going to work, but I see plenty of posts here where people find modules unreliable or hard to get set up.
Likewise something like a Jumper TX with multi protocol on board for $80 is a much steeper learning curve, which cost me two weeks flying to get over! I didn’t suggest that as it seemed overly complicated for a first step.
I considered the above solution the simplest and cheapest way to get both quad and new plane reliably set up.
I wouldn’t claim that was in any way the best possible solution and hope that the OP feels they can make a decision based on the very wide range of good ideas offered by more experienced hands.
 
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#18
If you have a toy type TX from a quad or similar you are unlikely to be able to find a suitable receiver, the protocols they use are often unique to toys.
The other issue with those types of TX is lack of features like servo reversing, dual rates and expo that make setting up and flying your first plane much easier and successful.
You are going to have to buy a proper TX. What you buy is going to be up to you, but Flysky make a great TX for under $50 which often ships with a receiver included.
The transmitter you have is a DSMX product from Horizon Hobby. You may be able to bind it to a DSMX receiver like the Lemon RX6. However the problem of no user settable rates, end points, expo or servo reverse will still be with you.
If you want a TX that will work with your Horizon Hobby stuff and DSMX receivers then Hobbyking sell the Orange TX6I transmitter which works great with BNF planes, I have one for my Sport Cub and it does all my FT builds using Lemon RX receivers which are about $15 each.
The receiver you have is not compatible at all, it’s a totally different protocol.
Every manufacturer has their own receiver protocol, most sub $50 TX’s will only work with the same protocol. There are magic transmitters or modules that have nearly all the protocols on them, meaning you can fly anything with them, but they are more complex to set up and cost more.
Ok I think i understand that radio systems aren't universal but should these work together fine?
https://hobbyking.com/en_us/oranger...-10-model-memory-and-3-pos-switch-mode-2.html
https://www.lemon-rx.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=59&product_id=104
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#19
In theory, yes.

Are you purchasing that Orange transmitter that you listed, used from someone? The transmitter you listed is no longer available from HobbyKing, and the next, most similar item, at $90, is out of stock. You can wait, but there’s no guarantee when or if they will restock the newer model.