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Inches not metric

#1
I love your builds but I would like to make a small request. When David does a build would he mind using US inches when providing detentions.
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#2
I kinda agree -- most people with a grasp of dimensions will intuitively think in one or the other.

It seems like more "post" work but perhaps we can have Imperial/metric subtitles?

(BTW, Welcome to the forum BentBiker! feel free to drop by "flite school" section and introduce yourself!)
 
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Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#4
Yeah and 28.3g in each oz, but it hurts my head to run the numbers, and more importantly, distracts me from what someones trying to say.

Won't say I won't watch it, or argue it's worth every effort, but it could help.
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#5
BTW, I'd argue thos goes both ways -- having metric subtitles seems only fair (although maybe too Canadian :p )
 

earthsciteach

Moderator
Moderator
#6
That may be true, but there are 142.8571 Stone per US short ton. I had to look that up on my phone. :p

I like the idea of using subtitles giving both SI and English units. I tend to use metric (cm) far more than English units when I'm building. So much easier for scaling, etc. Sometimes I use a weird mix of both, depending on which ruler I can find at any given moment.
 

eagle4

New member
#7
bentbiker, you know that the majority of the world uses metric, it just makes more sence than imperial. i think there are like 2 or 3 countries left that still cling to inches and feet. this is a global show mate :) also its not hard to convert, also most rulers have inches and cm on them. i know mine does
 
#11
Oh just butch up and use a converter, maybe even LEARN to convert in your head. Ya, I use SAE normally and the biggest reason we don't convert to metric in America is that it would cost about a billion dollars in road signs alone, BUT we're on an individual level and as modelers, we should be a cut above. We're creating here. You don't want to convert, go buy a plug and fly and be blissfull. You want the challenge of a build, learn to use ALL your tools. Specially that one between your ears.

This is actually the first time I've had this talk from the SAE side. It's usually some wanker complaining that Merica don't use metric. Kinda fun
 

IBeHoey

The Warranty Voider
#12
Ditto on using a mixture of both, drives my father nuts too. Personally, I was drawn towards using metric primarily because of my phobia of fractions. Well, can't say it's a real phobia but I've never been good with fractions. Even when I'm forced to use imperial, I always break the fractions down to decimal form. I don't know what it is, but there's just something comforting about working with whole numbers.
 

earthsciteach

Moderator
Moderator
#13
I always have fun with my students explaining the randomness of the origins Starndard measuring system. They can't measure with it anyway. And, they can't convert within the SI system, either. They're pretty much screwed both ways.
 

jhitesma

Some guy in the desert
Mentor
#14
I'm in the US but I'd rather see Chad and Josh start using metric than David have to work in imperial units.

I much prefer working in metric if I'm given a choice.
 
#16
Well i'm English and as a rule we use both at once, for example at the Lumber or wood yard ? We for example buy a 3 meter length of 2 by 4. Now that confuses the non locals! But being a American car nut as well i love the conversations as both parties are constantly converting English into Americanese or the other way.

Happy 4th for all you feet n inches guys.
 

willsonman

Builder Extraordinare
Mentor
#17
I actually prefer metric because its just easier. Imperial divisions on the fly can be way too complicated. I find that keeping my calculator handy is one of those essential tools. Since the majority of my work is in metric it just makes sense to me. Now, Home improvements I stick with imperial because that is how my house was built.
 

Carl

Junior Member
#18
The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial[1]) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced. The system came into official use across the British Empire. By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement. The United Kingdom has partially adopted it.

The U.S.A, Liberia, and Burma and the United Kingdom use the Imperial System.

I was surprised to find out only three countries still use the old British Imperial system

So the question is why did all the other countries change?
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#19
Much as I hate to credit the French (sorry Ant), they *did* come up with an easy, well defined system of units that scales and converts very nicely.

Not usually apparent in day-to-day, but in engineering, there's typically constants tossed into equations just to take account of units used. In imperial systems, these numbers are frequently funky. In metric units they're usually just a decimal shift (if any at all).

The list you've found are a list of the most stubborn (and possibly anti-french) countries around.

In fact, I'm half surprised the UK is still on the list . . .