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Just another D.W. Tricopter build thread

Liemavick

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#1
Just another D.W. Tricopter build thread (updated)

I started the build today after getting what I hope was the last box of parts. So far I'm using Davids build video as a guide. I couldn't find what I needed to raise the servo to the pivot mount so I used a dime. It was the perfect height for me. It did add to the cost of the project by another $ .10. :) I got all my ESC's soldered with connectors and started on my wiring harness and called it quits for the night. Left everything in a pile just to make my wife happy.

Some progress pics...

DSCN0107.JPG DSCN0108.JPG DSCN0110.JPG DSCN0112.JPG DSCN0113.JPG DSCN0115.JPG
 
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Liemavick

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#5
I gathered the parts over a couple weeks so it flew under the radar for a while. My son and his big mouth got the wifes attention and I had to come semi clean. Did you know you could build one of these for around $50? LOL Teach If your going to go the wire harness route instead of a power distribution board order the harness from HK. I'm making mine, but unless you have a high powered soldering iron it will be tough getting a good joint on four wires where they come together. Had I remembered when I was placing orders I would have just bought the harness. Also if you go that route you wont have to buy wire, extra connectors, shrink wrap, etc...
 

Liemavick

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#7
If you want to use a power distribution board Ill send you mine gratis, as I'm not going to use it. I just visualized a cleaner build using the wire harness instead once I started assembling the thing. Tedious? I haven't even got to the fun stuff yet, this part of the build is a cake walk. Just remember who we both have to blame for this.
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#9
I want to say something. Can I say something? :rolleyes:

I'm going to do something different this time on my tricopter build. No bullet connectors. That will remove 18 joints that can break or open. A connector has three (solder joint, connection, solder joint) and I will leave it at one (solder joint). Only thing is you have to check the direction of the motors first. It will also remove weight and cost and increase agility and battery time a tiny bit.

Something a lot of people overlook is weight on their copters. You could get much more flight time if you built it light! Im actually planning on using smaller AWG wire on my tricopter. :black_eyed:
 

Liemavick

Member
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#10
To each his own Colerex. Id prefer being able to unplug a fried ESC and swap it out vs unsoldering direct connections. You will end up with a cleaner look doing it your way which I like. Weight savings is so minimal not using connectors I wouldn't even go there.
 

Budge

Junior Member
#11
I'm just now ordering the parts for my tricopter build. I can't seem to find an appropriate servo or propellers in stock. Any suggestions for alternatives?
 

Cyberdactyl

Misfit Multirotor Monkey
#12
One of the primary reasons for bullet connectors is during a crash. If everything is soldered and you have a pretty severe crash, stuff is going to 'tear' apart, instead of merely unplugging, and most likely at locations that will ruin the ESC or the motor.
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#13
To each his own Colerex. Id prefer being able to unplug a fried ESC and swap it out vs unsoldering direct connections. You will end up with a cleaner look doing it your way which I like. Weight savings is so minimal not using connectors I wouldn't even go there.
How often do you fry your ESC's? :D
 

Liemavick

Member
Mentor
#15
Love it Monkey! Go for it. I thought about it, but decided against it for the first build. I'm sure I'll be troubleshooting enough stuff and wanted to use products that some people were familiar with.
 

FlyingMonkey

Stuck in Sunny FL
Staff member
Admin
#16
Yeah, if I would just quit being so lazy, and get to building it, I'd have a quad right now.

On my tricopter, I used the dremel to cut an indent for the folding arms, where they meet the frame bolts on their leading edges. I think it gives it a bit more security.
 
#17
On my tricopter, I used the dremel to cut an indent for the folding arms, where they meet the frame bolts on their leading edges. I think it gives it a bit more security.
I have been thinking of something similar for mine. Though I was going to print out the frame plates. The big issue I can see is that the frame has to flex enough to let the arms slip out of the indents. If its too tight the arms won't be able to swing back at all.
 
#18
Regarding the indents and adding a bit of toggle 'grip' where the forward arms meet the vertical frame bolts: I'm wondering if you put a tiny neodymium magnet inset into the boom where it touches the bolt if that would work? It could offer a sturdy 'grip' without any chance of a physical locking up in the event of crash trama.

Just a thought.
 

Liemavick

Member
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#19
At this point the notches would allow the arms to line up with the frame which I like. The added benifit of a bit more resistance is a good thing as well. I have my bolts tightened to where the arms move, but with some effort. as the wood wears from repeated folding Id assume they would have to be snugged up a bit down the road.

I found last night I wasnt able to thread the wire harness through the frame as I invisioned so I will be making a third plate for now to strap the battery to and cover the wire harness. The camera/battery tray will come down the road a bit, since I won't be mounting a camera on it for a while.

I also started messing with programming the ESC's last night. Do you calibrate them first and then program? Does it make a difference? Also do you calibrate all 3 at once as a group or individually?
 
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Liemavick

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#20
A little more progress...
DSCN0116.JPG DSCN0117.JPG


it was actually kinda nice building something without the glue gun for a change :)
The i86 board was fairly simple to set up. On the bench I have 3 motors running at what appear to be the same speed, gyro seems to be working as well, servo and yaw mechanics are smooth. Only thing I did was swap the receiver aileron and rudder wires so It moved the yaw control to the right hand stick. The way the i86 instructions had it wired put it on the throttle stick.