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Pumpkin drop event

Lesson learned in frustration

JTarmstr

Well-known member
#81
My impression is that they haven't yet finalized the rules and that we're more or less still operating on the old ones until such time as the tests and the new guidelines get pushed out.
The gist I got from FAA.gov was that you had to be registered and follow the (formerly section 336) guidelines. But I am prone to second guessing and am always worrying I missed something important.
 

JennyC6

Well-known member
#82
The gist I got from FAA.gov was that you had to be registered and follow the (formerly section 336) guidelines. But I am prone to second guessing and am always worrying I missed something important.
Mm, and I'm pretty much indifferent to what the FAA says in the first place so I'm not sure what they're doing at the moment. Guess we'll see in due course!
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#83
The latest news is they snuck new legislation on the back of something else.

Soon ALL rc aircraft will have to have an 11 gram 200+ dollar transponder on it.

Check out...

 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#85
So our RC club had their annual fly-in this past weekend, and due to work and family things, the only day I could've gone was Sunday (the event was Fri-Sun)...and even then I was too tired to do much of anything. It was kind of a bad week last week anyways.

So, this makes my 2nd year in a row that I didn't go. Last year I didn't go b/c of our new baby daugher. I kinda wanted to go this year but things just didn't pan out. From the pictures I saw on Facebook it looks like it was a fun event and everybody had a good time despite the rainy weather too.

Well this got me thinking about the last time I went to the fly-in. At that time I was there almost the whole time...I still had to work, so I was out one of the days. Well I went inside the club house at one point to get some food for my wife and I and had a conversation with one of the club members' wives (who was preparing the food) that went like this:

Me: "yeah, I think, I'll get my planes out here in a few and start flying".
Club member wife: "Well you gotta pay $20 (or however much it was) to fly first"
Me: "Well I'm a member here (in the event maybe she didn't recognize me)"
Club member wife: "Doesn't matter, everyone's gotta pay to fly"
Me: "Oh"

I was not informed by any club member that we had to pay to fly even if we were a member. I don't think it was so much the money, BUT moreso the fact I wasn't told. Plus, it just didn't make sense to me that current clubs members who pay their dues ALSO have to pay to fly at the event they're even hosting. Maybe that's how it is, I don't know. Like I said, I just wish an official club member told me this.

I didn't verify this with a club member afterwards. I was kind of in shock. I think I ended up flying once without paying and then packed it up.

Is this a common thing for clubs who host fly-in events like this?
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#86
So our RC club had their annual fly-in this past weekend, and due to work and family things, the only day I could've gone was Sunday (the event was Fri-Sun)...and even then I was too tired to do much of anything. It was kind of a bad week last week anyways.

So, this makes my 2nd year in a row that I didn't go. Last year I didn't go b/c of our new baby daugher. I kinda wanted to go this year but things just didn't pan out. From the pictures I saw on Facebook it looks like it was a fun event and everybody had a good time despite the rainy weather too.

Well this got me thinking about the last time I went to the fly-in. At that time I was there almost the whole time...I still had to work, so I was out one of the days. Well I went inside the club house at one point to get some food for my wife and I and had a conversation with one of the club members' wives (who was preparing the food) that went like this:

Me: "yeah, I think, I'll get my planes out here in a few and start flying".
Club member wife: "Well you gotta pay $20 (or however much it was) to fly first"
Me: "Well I'm a member here (in the event maybe she didn't recognize me)"
Club member wife: "Doesn't matter, everyone's gotta pay to fly"
Me: "Oh"

I was not informed by any club member that we had to pay to fly even if we were a member. I don't think it was so much the money, BUT moreso the fact I wasn't told. Plus, it just didn't make sense to me that current clubs members who pay their dues ALSO have to pay to fly at the event they're even hosting. Maybe that's how it is, I don't know. Like I said, I just wish an official club member told me this.

I didn't verify this with a club member afterwards. I was kind of in shock. I think I ended up flying once without paying and then packed it up.

Is this a common thing for clubs who host fly-in events like this?
All my club's fly-in events are free to attend for everyone - except our monthly multi-GP multi-rotor races (more on that in a minute). We plan for event prizes, drinks, and food in the annual budget for the club that's funded by member dues, and we'd much rather have people come have fun, and entice non-members to join the club, than try to keep track of who paid what to whom at an event.

Our monthly multi-rotor races do have a small fee for members and non-members that's used to buy more and better gates and race timers and prizes - this group tends to be heavily weighted to non-club members and while we do want to support the community and the races, the equipment upgrades aren't cheap and we haven't seen many of these pilots transition to club members over the last several years, so by charging a race fee it's able to cover it's own operating and equipment expenses without dipping into the other parts of the budget.
 

basslord1124

Well-known member
#87
All my club's fly-in events are free to attend for everyone - except our monthly multi-GP multi-rotor races (more on that in a minute). We plan for event prizes, drinks, and food in the annual budget for the club that's funded by member dues, and we'd much rather have people come have fun, and entice non-members to join the club, than try to keep track of who paid what to whom at an event.

Our monthly multi-rotor races do have a small fee for members and non-members that's used to buy more and better gates and race timers and prizes - this group tends to be heavily weighted to non-club members and while we do want to support the community and the races, the equipment upgrades aren't cheap and we haven't seen many of these pilots transition to club members over the last several years, so by charging a race fee it's able to cover it's own operating and equipment expenses without dipping into the other parts of the budget.
Thanks for the reply @rockyboy . I think they keep enough in the budget to accommodate for events as far as supplies and stuff and I can understand if something has additional costs (your multi-rotor races) to charge for those. I want to think they do charge for outside members to fly at the fly-in and I know they are planning on charging outside folks to race on our RC dirt track (once it gets completed). Perhaps they always charge for anyone to fly at the fly-in and I just didn't know. I think that was my first year actually attempting to fly at the fly-in.
 
#88
Unfortunately, in my past experience, these clubs usually end up costing money (dues) that basically go to some type of use fee or club stuff that not everyone wants to be a part of. I especially don't like to pay to fly if I already pay club dues or have AMA--crazy!!! I like clubs to an extent but having been a member of some in the past it does not always end well for anyone. I remember we were just a group of 10 or 15 people flying (no club) in a safe place away from everything in the middle of a southern California desert having a blast with the guys and their kids and friends etc on Saturdays and Sundays all totally informal. We were teaching people to fly, new people would come by and want to look or learn and never had a safety issue or injury of any kind. Then one of the older guys in the group decided, "hey we should make a club!!". Most of the reaction was negative cause we thought it was not necessary--what was the benefit.? Why?

Somehow a club got formed and then the guy that started it went to get permission to fly on this open area of desert for some reason?? As soon as he let the owner know we were flying RC planes there--we were demanded to stay off the piece of nice flat barren desert and never return due to some possible liability--hell we never knew the spot was even "owned" cause it was in the middle of nowhere!! No one ever got hurt there and we left the area cleaner then when we came on weekends. Now we had to find another place to fly--everyone got disgusted and very few of us our even friends now. It was because many people had other areas they wanted to fly and then went about convincing other members of why one spot was more advantageous over another, so we all went to our own best flying locations.

So the morale of all this club stuff as I learned is be careful what you ask for and know what the benefits and drawbacks are going to be of this "club stuff"--not to mention this new FAA rule stuff coming. I realize not everyone has an open area to fly and sometimes to secure or use an area it is necessary to pool resources (cash) to get a spot, but if you are in the middle of nowhere and no airports, highways, people, houses etc, I would just fly and consider myself blessed with that area (and your flying buddies if you have them with you too)--no need for signs or clubs--you might be just asking for the FAA to come by and see what you are doing--possibly? Then more rules, regulations etc.....
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#89
This is a bit off topic but do you have to join a club/AMA if you register with the FAA? I haven't been flying since the new rules came out and I have had a tough time figuring out the exact rules. My impression before was that with park flyers you just had to obey the AMA's guidelines and common sense, but that has changed? I dont want to be breaking the law but I also dont want to spend a bunch of money on memberships and registration if I dont have to.
AT THIS TIME (and I'm emphasizing that it could change at any time), you do NOT need to join the AMA. However, it is understood that if you are flying an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and you are NOT part of a community based organization such as the AMA, you need to be Part 107 certified. And that IS different from joining a club; most clubs will require AMA membership for various reasons (they can apply for funding from the AMA, for example, but the biggest one is that you have insurance for each pilot who is an AMA member).

Now, there's ALSO the FAA requirements of drone registration, which are separate from the Part 107 and Part 336 requirements. The drone registration requires you to pay $5 for your registration number. Now, this is even trickier, because on the FAA's drone registration site, it says that you have to pay $5 per aircraft. HOWEVER, that ONLY applies if you are flying under the Part 107 certification, and NOT flying under the Community Based Organization rules (part 336). If you are under the part 336, it is $5, and it covers all of your planes. Confusing? Yes. Welcome to government. LOL

So, to recap - as of right now, you do NOT need to join the AMA. However, if you do not, you should be Part 107 certified. Now, Part 107 certification is pretty involved; it involves a lot of ground school information and testing that MUST be done with a certified instructor (I looked into it because of commercial applications that I'd been interested in). You are MORE than welcome to go that route, but let me state that it is a LOT easier to join the AMA than it is to become a Part 107 certified pilot. In addition, if you go do things like Flite Fest, or want to go to Joe Nall and fly, or visit a club field somewhere, you'll most likely need AMA membership because they will require the membership for flying. For that alone, it's worth it in my book to have it.
 
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#90
I have been looking into the whole AMA membership thing and I have come to this conclusion. As a hobby this is a difficult time. Things change almost on an hourly basis. I have been flying with my sons for five years. They are almost 21 and attending the Ohio State University. I have acquired my AMA membership for the same reasons stated above. My sons are starving college students and at this time even $75 per year is an unnecessary expense for them. I plan to get the Park Pilot Program memberships ($38) in time for Flite Fest Ohio. We have an AMA field near our house in Westerville, Ohio and they will need them should we want to fly there (infrequently). I really hope the government does not micromanage such a fun activity into non existence.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#91
I have been looking into the whole AMA membership thing and I have come to this conclusion. As a hobby this is a difficult time. Things change almost on an hourly basis. I have been flying with my sons for five years. They are almost 21 and attending the Ohio State University. I have acquired my AMA membership for the same reasons stated above. My sons are starving college students and at this time even $75 per year is an unnecessary expense for them. I plan to get the Park Pilot Program memberships ($38) in time for Flite Fest Ohio. We have an AMA field near our house in Westerville, Ohio and they will need them should we want to fly there (infrequently). I really hope the government does not micromanage such a fun activity into non existence.
Trust me, that's what so many in the hobby are worried about - and not just the end hobbyists, but the manufacturers, as well. Think about it - you tell everyone that they have to have a $200 transponder on each of their models, something that could be more than double the cost of the model itself? There are going to be a lot of people stepping away from the hobby, and the companies are going to go belly up.

I know the transponders are being aimed at those who are flying commercial, photography style drones (such as the DJI Phantom, for example), and especially aimed at the Amazon drones that they want to implement for delivery. The idea behind it is well intentioned, but we all know that the path to Hell is paved with good intentions...We'll have to see how this shakes out, honestly...