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My 1st Post: pic & bat questions

#1
First the pic
IMG_2622.jpg

My first FT plane, a Simple Cub. (This is also my first plane in more than 40 years! Things have changed :)
I made 2 changes (3 if you count the stripe): 1) I added a tail wheel which I purchased from the FT Store, 2) I added wheel pants (scratch built), 3) The stripe is trimmed electricians tape.
I have not maidened it yet: I wanted to use up a battery just on the ground. That's why the wheel pants... when I first taxied around, I left a trail of stuff on the wings kicked up by the wheels on the wet pavement (I leave in the wet part of Oregon). (They are not painted; that's how the $tree foam board came)
Battery questions: The battery is made by Tattu and has 5 values on its label: 3 cells; 11.1 V, 14.4 Wh, 1300 mAh, and 45C. I think I understand most of this but I don't have a clue what the 14.4 Wh is trying to tell me (what's a "Wh"?). And I think the 45 C is a measure of how fast the battery can be discharged in use. There is also a "C" rate that applies to charging... Right? Speaking of charging...
Charger questions: I have a Prodigy 610ez charger by ProTecRC. It may be "ez" but it is quite complicated (because it's flexible). I got it set up and it has successfully charge the battery, but I want to make sure I have this right: the Amp value depends on the "mAh" ratting and the "C" rate you want for charging. I just used the suggested rate of 1.2 A. Was that OK?
ad(thanks)vance, -=# Paul #=-
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#2
Welcome to the forums, nice Cub BTW. You bring up some good questions about the battery. You got the discharge thing right, the C rating is about how quickly the battery will release the power, the higher the C rating the faster bursts you will get. But it isn't an exact science, it's a bit of a fluff number. They usually exaggerate the actual number.

The charging should be what your charger recommended. If you have a 1300mah battery the charge should be 1.3 amps. A 2200mah should be 2.2 amps. a 4000mah battery should charge at 4 amps. if that makes sense. The 14.4Wh will be one that I can't answer.

Good luck on the maiden (y)
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#3
First the pic View attachment 156647
My first FT plane, a Simple Cub. (This is also my first plane in more than 40 years! Things have changed :)
I made 2 changes (3 if you count the stripe): 1) I added a tail wheel which I purchased from the FT Store, 2) I added wheel pants (scratch built), 3) The stripe is trimmed electricians tape.
I have not maidened it yet: I wanted to use up a battery just on the ground. That's why the wheel pants... when I first taxied around, I left a trail of stuff on the wings kicked up by the wheels on the wet pavement (I leave in the wet part of Oregon). (They are not painted; that's how the $tree foam board came)
Battery questions: The battery is made by Tattu and has 5 values on its label: 3 cells; 11.1 V, 14.4 Wh, 1300 mAh, and 45C. I think I understand most of this but I don't have a clue what the 14.4 Wh is trying to tell me (what's a "Wh"?). And I think the 45 C is a measure of how fast the battery can be discharged in use. There is also a "C" rate that applies to charging... Right? Speaking of charging...
Charger questions: I have a Prodigy 610ez charger by ProTecRC. It may be "ez" but it is quite complicated (because it's flexible). I got it set up and it has successfully charge the battery, but I want to make sure I have this right: the Amp value depends on the "mAh" ratting and the "C" rate you want for charging. I just used the suggested rate of 1.2 A. Was that OK?
ad(thanks)vance, -=# Paul #=-
Watt Hours is what Wh stands for and in a perfect world it would be an indication of the total power available from the battery. In this case the manufacturer has taken a bit of licence and just multiplied the terminal voltage, (11.1 Volts), by the battery capacity in Amp/Hours, (1.3). The result of the multiplication renders a figure of 14.43 Watt Hours.

Do not overly worry about the Wh as the figure is almost meaningless in the way the manufacturer has used it. The terminal voltage varies with the state of charge and so unless the manufacturer actually measured the Wh the figure given is just an added bit of useless information and is used to baffle those who are new to the batteries and how they actually function.

Have fun!
 
#4
Thank you both!! One more charging question: I got a charging bag...
IMG_2624.jpg

Am I using this right? Also, the last line in the warning box is "This ProTek R/C charging bag will not stop a lipo fire. It is intended to reduce the chance of damage in the event of a lipo fire." The previous bullet item it the warning essentially says not to charge in an environment where a fire would be problem. So who needs the bag?
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#5
Thank you both!! One more charging question: I got a charging bag...
View attachment 156654
Am I using this right? Also, the last line in the warning box is "This ProTek R/C charging bag will not stop a lipo fire. It is intended to reduce the chance of damage in the event of a lipo fire." The previous bullet item it the warning essentially says not to charge in an environment where a fire would be problem. So who needs the bag?
Lipo fires tend to be really hot and really hard to put out. the bag will help reduce collateral damage to the immediate surrounding area. Being they are so combustable if they do go off, the best thing is to just let them burn out. I have heard of people even storing and charging them in an ammo box. If you go on YouTube and search up lipo fires you will get a good idea of what I mean.

Really when it comes down to it, if you are the kind of person who really is negligent on the care and maintenance of your batteries or have one that is badly damaged then it will be a concern. If you take care of them, don't discharge them to far, or over charge them on heavy amp setting beyond the recommended multiple times then you should be good. They are relatively safe batteries if you take care of them. The bag is an extra layer of protection and peace of mind. Myself i rarely use the bag unless i am charging a questionable battery or i will store them in the bag for extended periods of time.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#6
Thank you both!! One more charging question: I got a charging bag...
View attachment 156654
Am I using this right? Also, the last line in the warning box is "This ProTek R/C charging bag will not stop a lipo fire. It is intended to reduce the chance of damage in the event of a lipo fire." The previous bullet item it the warning essentially says not to charge in an environment where a fire would be problem. So who needs the bag?
The bags function is to store and transport your batteries and you should never charge them in the bag.
Lipo batteries are only at risk of damage, fire, etc when they get hot and charging them in the bag will tend to cause their temperature to rise due to a lack of air circulation.

You should monitor battery temperature during charge, before use and after use. If at any time the battery becomes hot disconnect it from everything and place in a place where it cannot cause a fire until it is cool. NEVER charge a hot battery. NEVER charge a battery at a high rate as it will reduce the battery life and can overheat the battery. NEVER store a battery where it will get hot. NEVER short out the battery. NEVER charge a battery in a plane, (air restriction can cause elevated temperatures). A damaged battery should be carefully monitored or replaced. NEVER charge a punctured battery.

I live in the land of bushfires and extreme temperatures and I store my batteries in a very cool place and cool them down severely before attempting to charge them. So far I have had NO fires or such events and I manage their temperatures to ensure that I never will!

It has worked for me for aver 6 years and I am still using batteries that are going strong after over 2 years of hard use! Never used a lipo bag!

Have fun!
 
#7
The bags function is to store and transport your batteries and you should never charge them in the bag.
Lipo batteries are only at risk of damage, fire, etc when they get hot and charging them in the bag will tend to cause their temperature to rise due to a lack of air circulation.

You should monitor battery temperature during charge, before use and after use. If at any time the battery becomes hot disconnect it from everything and place in a place where it cannot cause a fire until it is cool. NEVER charge a hot battery. NEVER charge a battery at a high rate as it will reduce the battery life and can overheat the battery. NEVER store a battery where it will get hot. NEVER short out the battery. NEVER charge a battery in a plane, (air restriction can cause elevated temperatures). A damaged battery should be carefully monitored or replaced. NEVER charge a punctured battery.

I live in the land of bushfires and extreme temperatures and I store my batteries in a very cool place and cool them down severely before attempting to charge them. So far I have had NO fires or such events and I manage their temperatures to ensure that I never will!

It has worked for me for aver 6 years and I am still using batteries that are going strong after over 2 years of hard use! Never used a lipo bag!

Have fun!
I checked out some youTube videos, even one from FT! Wow!!! I am going to treat my LiPo batteries with respect.
 

Jackson T

Well-known member
#10
When you multiply the C rating by the Ah rating (the mAh rating divided by 1000), you get the maximum discharge current. Your 1300mAh 45C battery can be discharged at up to 1.3 x 45 = 58.5 amps. The Flite Test power packs won't pull anywhere near those amps, so you've got plenty of margin there.
 

Andrew

G'day Mate
#11
First the pic View attachment 156647
My first FT plane, a Simple Cub. (This is also my first plane in more than 40 years! Things have changed :)
I made 2 changes (3 if you count the stripe): 1) I added a tail wheel which I purchased from the FT Store, 2) I added wheel pants (scratch built), 3) The stripe is trimmed electricians tape.
I have not maidened it yet: I wanted to use up a battery just on the ground. That's why the wheel pants... when I first taxied around, I left a trail of stuff on the wings kicked up by the wheels on the wet pavement (I leave in the wet part of Oregon). (They are not painted; that's how the $tree foam board came)
Battery questions: The battery is made by Tattu and has 5 values on its label: 3 cells; 11.1 V, 14.4 Wh, 1300 mAh, and 45C. I think I understand most of this but I don't have a clue what the 14.4 Wh is trying to tell me (what's a "Wh"?). And I think the 45 C is a measure of how fast the battery can be discharged in use. There is also a "C" rate that applies to charging... Right? Speaking of charging...
Charger questions: I have a Prodigy 610ez charger by ProTecRC. It may be "ez" but it is quite complicated (because it's flexible). I got it set up and it has successfully charge the battery, but I want to make sure I have this right: the Amp value depends on the "mAh" ratting and the "C" rate you want for charging. I just used the suggested rate of 1.2 A. Was that OK?
ad(thanks)vance, -=# Paul #=-
The "Watt Hours" written on Battery's is becoming commonplace due to restrictions by commercial airline companies, most airlines will allow about 100Wh (Watt Hours) in carrying on luggage.
Tattu is a very good trusted brand in the drone racing community so the C rating is more realistic than the cheaper brands.
99.9% of people use the 1 C rule when charging no matter the brand or battery size, in this case 1300 X 1C = 1300mAh charging rate that is safe to charge at.
 

Andrew

G'day Mate
#12
The "Watt Hours" written on Battery's is becoming commonplace due to restrictions by commercial airline companies, most airlines will allow about 100Wh (Watt Hours) in carrying on luggage.
Tattu is a very good trusted brand in the drone racing community so the C rating is more realistic than the cheaper brands.
99.9% of people use the 1 C rule when charging no matter the brand or battery size, in this case 1300 X 1C = 1300mAh charging rate that is safe to charge at.
Also you should ALWAYS balance charge when the battery pack has more than one cell otherwise you have a much greater chance of pyrotechnic firework display.