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Pumpkin drop event

New drone registration.

JTarmstr

Well-known member
#41
I came accross this a while back.
View attachment 123480
I shared it in the official Inav telegram and there is a few airline pilots that hang around there and they told me this is pretty much what they are instructed to do, report anything as a UAV.
They also talked about some airliners pilots association that wanted to ban all non-commercial UAVs altogether, one can dream.

I have been told that similar bullcrap is supposed to come in europe, they can hope all they want but I wont register my extremely temporary aircrafts and no one will blame me for that.

So the batwing, UFO (guess they misspelled the acronym, its UAV now), Starship Enterprise and the U.S. Military are now UAVs? Wow only thing they forgot is that house in the movie Up. I remember a quote in the autobiography of Ernest K Gann, (Fate is the Hunter), His mentor Ross while training him to fly the DC-2 for American airlines says “Anyone can do the job when things are going right. In this business we play for keeps.” Its one of my favorite quotes and shows how pilots back then were always prepared when something went wrong, its unfortunates that many corporate pilots cant fly by the seat of their pants and just program the computer. This isn't meant to be a blanket statement but it seems like much of the outward attitude I see is wishing for all the problems to go away because of legislation.

Note: I am not saying all airline pilots are bad, there are many fantastic pilots out there (Captain Sulley, The woman who landed her 737 after the engine exploded), this is just noting a lot of the complaints I see by the airline industry.
 

CarolineTyler

Well-known member
#42
I came accross this a while back.
View attachment 123480
I shared it in the official Inav telegram and there is a few airline pilots that hang around there and they told me this is pretty much what they are instructed to do, report anything as a UAV.
They also talked about some airliners pilots association that wanted to ban all non-commercial UAVs altogether, one can dream.

I have been told that similar bullcrap is supposed to come in europe, they can hope all they want but I wont register my extremely temporary aircrafts and no one will blame me for that.
Good chart but missing this English drone...
il_570xN.1274820172_8xpt.jpg
 

Tjhochha

Active member
#44
Can you all clarify something? Is this saying that anything over 250G has to be registered? Does this include RC Planes or just drones? My main concern is when was the last time one of your Planes or drones lasted 3 years. I have built about 15 planes in the past 4 months. Destroyed 4 of them. Do I have to register each one for the short time I fly before I destroy it? Do I get a refund when its destroyed? Can I transfer it to another plane? And basically the rules mean all FPV races are breaking the rules as you do not maintain line of site. I loose line of site flying a tiny whoop in my apartment....
Since they are considering UAV's airplanes, I'm pretty sure that you will need to file a FAA and NTSB incident report after every crash and have them come out and do a full crash investigation. ;)
 

IanSR

Active member
#47
I have a lot of paperwork to do...:p
Same here, I even emailed the drone guy at the CAA asking about where they went and how detailed they had to be once the law changes here (the same crap was in the January report) and also asked for clarification about my 24gram tinywoop and whether I would go to jail for life for flying it around the garden since my house is on the edge of the proposed NFZ, but flights over our estate are banned so there would be no chance of a collision.

I didn't get a reply, which experience tells me means a lightbulb has flickered on somewhere and someone is trying to work out how to avoid sending hundreds of pensioners to jail for daring to fly a whoop out in the wild.
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
Mentor
#48
Since they are considering UAV's airplanes, I'm pretty sure that you will need to file a FAA and NTSB incident report after every crash and have them come out and do a full crash investigation. ;)
I said we should all band tigether and do that very thing when drone registration became a reality the first time.

STILL plan on doing that if they get much more into our buisiness as hobbyists.
 

ElectriSean

Eternal Student
Mentor
#49
I wish you all the best in regulating your regulators, but sadly I think you only need to look a little north to see your future..
 

JTarmstr

Well-known member
#53
Is it just me or is mentality part of the problem? Everyone is so used to being treated properly that they forget some people dont play by the rules? More laws wont fix it, better enforcement will. Cant really be surprised considering the state our politics are in right now.
 

DamoRC

Well-known member
Mentor
#57
Just in from AMA. Note they warn about scam sites. Now registration numbers are supposed to be displayed on the outside of the plane.

The following is the text of the email.

Dear members,

We're writing to let you know the FAA issued an Interim Final Rule today that will require drone pilots and model aircraft pilots to display their FAA-issued registration number on the outside surface of their aircraft. The rule will take effect on Monday, February 25, which means the markings must be in place for any outdoor flight beginning on that date.

Although most AMA members already have their FAA registration number posted on the outside of their aircraft, AMA will be submitting comments to the FAA requesting a waiver process for those who might be burdened by external markings, such as members who fly scale replica model aircraft. Most importantly, this rule does not change the original acceptable methods of external marking, nor does it specify a particular external surface on which the registration number must be placed. The requirement is simply that the registration number must be seen upon visual inspection of the aircraft's exterior.

As you know, the registration requirement is not new. Congress reinstated this requirement in December 2017 with the passage of the National Defense Authorization Act. Although this rule was flexible and allowed the registration marking to be placed in an enclosed compartment, law enforcement officials and FAA partners have expressed concerns about the safety risks a concealed explosive device could pose to first responders when opening a compartment to find a registration number.

If you would like to submit your own comment on the Interim Final Rule, simply visit www.regulations.gov and search for "RIN 2120-AL32." You can also visit www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=93045 to learn more. The deadline for public comment ends on March 15, 2019.

If you are uncertain if you have a valid FAA registration, you can access your FAA account at https://faadronezone.faa.gov/#. This site will allow you to view your personal FAA registration number and expiration date. We strongly advise you to avoid registering your model aircraft anywhere other than the official FAA website. If you register under Section 336, there is a $5 fee for a three-year registration, and hobbyists receive one identification number for all of their aircraft. Please be aware of unofficial registration websites that charge exorbitant fees or require separate registration fees for each recreational aircraft.

We continue to work closely with the FAA to determine the best path forward regarding recreational UAS operating requirements. As always, thank you for your continued support, and please reach out with any questions.

Thank you,
AMA Government Affairs
 

FDS

Well-known member
#59
If I was contemplating a proper “concealed explosive device” in my “uav” I don’t think that I would register it with the FAA first.
You guys are in danger of having tighter controls on model flying than on firearms. You need a better lobbying body surely?
It will be our turn in June.