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New to flying r/c

#1
Hello everyone,
I am just starting out building r/c planes. I have very little experience with r/c in general. I've built a "robot"car for a competition/course and recently hot glued a few pieces of basswood into a boat with brushed turbo-jets.

Currently, I am attempting to scratch build a half sheet plan I found on the forum (https://www.flitetest.com/articles/half-sheet-no-wastethree-channel-trainer) but it calls for some scrap pieces on top of the half sheet. So I've also begun an FT mini Scout to produce the requisite waste pieces. (Such a terrible situation to be in, I'm sure.)

Future build plans include an FT Alpha, FT kraken, and FT A-10... probably in that order.

I am really interested in FPV as well. Found a $100 eachine set of goggles that I'm tempted to get but I don't know what else I would need or what any of the acronyms and stats mean yet.

Pictures of my "handiwork" will follow as progress is made.

EDIT: P.S. what are flight controllers for if everything is controlled from the rx/servos? Do/will I need one?
 

moret

Well-known member
#2
Hello everyone,

EDIT: P.S. what are flight controllers for if everything is controlled from the rx/servos? Do/will I need one?
Short answer, Flight controllers are for more advance stuff. Non of my FT planes have a flight controller, My "got at a store" carbon cub S+ does have a flight controller. I think usually the receiver would plug into the flight controller so you have control and then your servos, ESC, etc would plug into the controller so it could control the plane as needed. Some of the systems may have Rec, FC in the same package. Some may call a receiver with a stability gyro a simple FC so your millage may vary.

Welcome, have fun, learn a lot, expect to crash, learn from them and build better.
I never crash, I am just stress testing FT designs:)
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#3
Flight controllers are primarily used for multicopter flight (aka drones). Some planes have them, but they’re usually only there to help smooth flight out. 😁

Let me warn you that the Kraken is a MONSTER build, as is the A-10, and the A-10 uses more advanced techniques for building. I’d probably recommend a Twin Arrow, Guinea Pig, or Sea Duck first for a twin engine before you tackle one of those monsters. 😁 That’s not to say you can’t build the Kraken or A-10, but you’re GONNA crash. It’s not a matter of if, it’s when. I’d hate for you to wreck something you put hours upon hours into making, only to turn it into a foam lawn dart on its maiden flight.

The Scouts are great planes; they’re fairly stable and allow you to run it through most of the gamut of aerobatics, while still being a relatively easy flyer. I’d suggest keeping with that one for a bit. 😁

As for acronyms, ask away! We’ll try to help out as best we can. 😁
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#4
Hello everyone,
I am just starting out building r/c planes. I have very little experience with r/c in general. I've built a "robot"car for a competition/course and recently hot glued a few pieces of basswood into a boat with brushed turbo-jets.

Currently, I am attempting to scratch build a half sheet plan I found on the forum (https://www.flitetest.com/articles/half-sheet-no-wastethree-channel-trainer) but it calls for some scrap pieces on top of the half sheet. So I've also begun an FT mini Scout to produce the requisite waste pieces. (Such a terrible situation to be in, I'm sure.)

Future build plans include an FT Alpha, FT kraken, and FT A-10... probably in that order.

I am really interested in FPV as well. Found a $100 eachine set of goggles that I'm tempted to get but I don't know what else I would need or what any of the acronyms and stats mean yet.

Pictures of my "handiwork" will follow as progress is made.

EDIT: P.S. what are flight controllers for if everything is controlled from the rx/servos? Do/will I need one?
with the no waste 3 channel trainer ensure that the rudder at full deflection does not contact the elevator at full travel or a loss of control is possible. Also ensure that the boom material does not flex too much. Outside those issues the design is quite a good performer!

No need for a flight controller but a Tx with Expo is highly recommended.

Have fun!
 
#5
with the no waste 3 channel trainer ensure that the rudder at full deflection does not contact the elevator at full travel or a loss of control is possible. Also ensure that the boom material does not flex too much. Outside those issues the design is quite a good performer!

No need for a flight controller but a Tx with Expo is highly recommended.

Have fun!
I might need to sand a bit of foam away once I install the anchors/horns on the control surfaces they collide a little when I push them manually to what I think is the proper angle, but my servos haven't arrived yet.

Getting everything through the mail helps keep me from burning out.

I've got an frsky i6-A that I've been using for my robot and boat. It has an expo setting but im not sure what it means yet.
 
#6
Flight controllers are primarily used for multicopter flight (aka drones). Some planes have them, but they’re usually only there to help smooth flight out. 😁

Let me warn you that the Kraken is a MONSTER build, as is the A-10, and the A-10 uses more advanced techniques for building. I’d probably recommend a Twin Arrow, Guinea Pig, or Sea Duck first for a twin engine before you tackle one of those monsters. 😁 That’s not to say you can’t build the Kraken or A-10, but you’re GONNA crash. It’s not a matter of if, it’s when. I’d hate for you to wreck something you put hours upon hours into making, only to turn it into a foam lawn dart on its maiden flight.

The Scouts are great planes; they’re fairly stable and allow you to run it through most of the gamut of aerobatics, while still being a relatively easy flyer. I’d suggest keeping with that one for a bit. 😁

As for acronyms, ask away! We’ll try to help out as best we can. 😁

Thank you for the advice. The kraken and a-10 are probably going to be from the speed build kits if I'm honest. The amount of trouble I had copying the plans onto my foam board and then removing the paper before assembly really chaffed for me.
Also the a-10 is my end goal, the kraken (though I will probably end up being the one to actually build/fix it) is going to be my girlfriend's. Both of which being water resistant would be a plus for the durability factor.

Build->fly->crash->fix-> repeat-> go (slightly) bigger

One other question I've had, that my local friend's answer hasn't satisfied me completely...
Can I run an a-pack equivalent motor (2250kv) on a 50 amp esc?
Further, can the mini scout fly with a c-pack equivalent motor (1180kv)?
 

whackflyer

Well-known member
#7
On the A-pack motor, yes, you can use a 50a ESC, although it is much larger than you need. On the mini scout, unfortunately the C-pack motor is much too heavy and powerful. Hope this helps!
 
#8
On the A-pack motor, yes, you can use a 50a ESC, although it is much larger than you need. On the mini scout, unfortunately the C-pack motor is much too heavy and powerful. Hope this helps!
Heavy and powerful... meaning i wouldn't be able to balance the forces for flight? (Nose heavy and uncontrollable rolling?)
 

FDS

Well-known member
#9
Yes, using too big motors makes the front nose heavy. Like nailing a brick to the front.
There’s smart ways to gain thrust in builds, like using the right prop with your motor, that don’t need huge motors.
On the minis light building and parts is essential for good flight characteristics, air molecules don’t scale down so wing loading on small planes is always higher. If you have a C pack motor just make a bigger plane for it!
If you want a good option for the mini scout I use this one on all the minis, it’s cheap, light and works great with a 6x4 APC prop on 2s lipo or a 5x3 on 3s.
 
#10
Because I wasn't sure, I ordered a couple of XD A2212 KV2200 motors from banggood they looked comparable to the a-kit motors. And they say they can run on 2-4 cells. Your option is cheaper but its to late to change to order.

"One" more question: how do you go about prop sizing? If it's simple enough that I can learn (or there's a popular app), I would like to. I don't have a problem ordering the suggested prop from the plans but I might end up needing different prop sizes due to the differences between the suggested motor and mine.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#11
Because I wasn't sure, I ordered a couple of XD A2212 KV2200 motors from banggood they looked comparable to the a-kit motors. And they say they can run on 2-4 cells. Your option is cheaper but its to late to change to order.

"One" more question: how do you go about prop sizing? If it's simple enough that I can learn (or there's a popular app), I would like to. I don't have a problem ordering the suggested prop from the plans but I might end up needing different prop sizes due to the differences between the suggested motor and mine.
For a beginner I recommend that you follow the motor manufacturers max prop recommendation BUT with a single condition. Never use a cheap prop on a high Kv Motor unless you want to have a prop explode in flight and then watch you plane shake itself to pieces in midair!

GRP or CF props are best at high rotational speeds!

Have fun!
 
#12
For a beginner I recommend that you follow the motor manufacturers max prop recommendation BUT with a single condition. Never use a cheap prop on a high Kv Motor unless you want to have a prop explode in flight and then watch you plane shake itself to pieces in midair!

GRP or CF props are best at high rotational speeds!

Have fun!
GRP? CF? Are these brands?

I will look at the specs for the ones ive ordered to get the props, thanks!

EDIT: I can't seem to find a recomended prop size for these motors in the listings. How safe would it be to assume it is the same as similar size/kv motors, since its the cheapest chinese knockoff i could easily find?
 
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Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#13
GRP? CF? Are these brands?

I will look at the specs for the ones ive ordered to get the props, thanks!

EDIT: I can't seem to find a recomended prop size for these motors in the listings. How safe would it be to assume it is the same as similar size/kv motors, since its the cheapest chinese knockoff i could easily find?
GRP is Glass reinforced Polyester and CF is carbon fibre.
As for a generic recommendation I would recommend a 6 x 5 prop as the absolute maximum if using 3S. With 2S you could use a 7x5 or slightly less, (7 x 4), whereas for 4S I would say a 5 x 4.5 would be the go!

Have fun!
 
#14
GRP is Glass reinforced Polyester and CF is carbon fibre.
As for a generic recommendation I would recommend a 6 x 5 prop as the absolute maximum if using 3S. With 2S you could use a 7x5 or slightly less, (7 x 4), whereas for 4S I would say a 5 x 4.5 would be the go!

Have fun!
Hopefully last question: 7x5 refers to diameter x pitch right? Is that the same as a 7050?
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#15
Hopefully last question: 7x5 refers to diameter x pitch right? Is that the same as a 7050?
You are 100% correct! Just make sure that the prop can handle the power you use! I have exploded a number of plastic props and now I avoid their use entirely! A quality prop gives quality performance!

Have fun!
 
#16
You are 100% correct! Just make sure that the prop can handle the power you use! I have exploded a number of plastic props and now I avoid their use entirely! A quality prop gives quality performance!

Have fun!
Awesome, thank you again.

Now, to the internet! Gotta source some cheap but decent props.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#17
A decent prop for FT type planes will run you between $5 and $15. Master Airscrew make good fast props, APC make good slower props. Cheap props are usually very badly balanced as well.
If you have a fast prop, spinning fast, you will have a fast moving plane. When you learn a fast moving over motored plane with high wing loads will usually be very “twitchy” to fly for a beginner and most often ends up as a fast moving lawn dart.
 
#18
A decent prop for FT type planes will run you between $5 and $15. Master Airscrew make good fast props, APC make good slower props. Cheap props are usually very badly balanced as well.
If you have a fast prop, spinning fast, you will have a fast moving plane. When you learn a fast moving over motored plane with high wing loads will usually be very “twitchy” to fly for a beginner and most often ends up as a fast moving lawn dart.
Hmmm... dually noted. Is a 2200kv overpowered for the mini scout? I see the wisdom in not slapping a c-pack motor on it.

Do the $5 versions come in 10-packs? Lol
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#19
Hmmm... dually noted. Is a 2200kv overpowered for the mini scout? I see the wisdom in not slapping a c-pack motor on it.

Do the $5 versions come in 10-packs? Lol
If you run the bird on 2S it will JUST be a proposition though you would need a high C battery and an experienced pilot because at full throttle it will be a rocket ship. Forget 3S and 4S unless you want to buy heaps of props and build many versions of the mini scout very soon or even continuously!

The 2200 may be ok if it is the tiniest of motors and then you may need to use props of 3" diameter so that you do not overload the motor and burn it out! The mini scout is happiest with motors around 100W from the wattage the Kv and prop are your choice though they must meet the motor requirements!

Have fun!
 

FDS

Well-known member
#20
The 1806 I linked is very light and smaller than the 2212, it’s given great performance on my minis with APC 6x4 props, I have run it on the Tiny Trainer, SE5A and Mini Guinea. SE5A runs 6x3 for more scale flying on 3s, the Guinea is a screamer on two 5x3 Graupner props with 3s and the TT runs a 6x4 on 2s. It’s fine because it’s small.
2212 is a lot bigger so will make more power but with a comparable prop will burn more amps and be physically heavier.
In the case of the motor you have in mind the KV and size is a problem. The only downside to the 1806 I use is it’s less efficient than a slightly bigger, lower KV motor (1000-1400kv) throwing a bigger prop. They are cheap enough that losing a minute or two of flight time isn’t much of a problem, you can typically cruise around quite nicely at a low throttle on it or go nuts with more power. When you start it might be worth limiting your throttle to 75% or so with the 1806/2400. Saves dumb thumbing to warp speed.
Generally the FT planes, especially the minis, are best flown off the recommended motor and prop, lighter and more efficient is what you are aiming for with RC planes.