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Help! New to Forum. Ft Egde 540 trainer?

#61
Oh - I forgot to ask - where you oplanning to build the edge from scratch, or from a speedbuild kit?

There's quite a bit of wood framework involved - and it is required or the plane will tear itself apart (as I found out with the prototype LOL)
 
#65
The black DTFB is fine. Peel off the INSIDE paper and you save some weight. (after everything is cut, spray it with some water and the paper comes right off) I never noticed a weight difference, but I always though it was a PITA to cut straight for some reason. Always ended up with ragged edges like the paper tore instead of cut.

For building - Build a bunch of stuff - just build it to practice. Trust me. Each one gets better and better. The tiny trainer with the MUTTS conversion, or the Das Little Stick in the user generated builds are some of the best flying planes out there. Both can be converted to mid wing with not much issue. I recommend EVERYONE build a stick style plane and fly the snot out of it - they are much more aerobatic than you think, and one heck of a performance jump from a cub style. I wouldn't say "beginner" but definitely a good stepping stone to higher performance.

Now - for building.

SKIP THE HOT GLUE, especially on more intricate builds. Buy a big bottle of Titebond Wood Glue, or Elmers wood glue, and cheap scotch tape. Especially on builds with the complex alignment, having more time helps, and less burnt fingers. It's also way lighter than HG. Titebond Quick & Thick is one of my favorites. Another trick is to use wood glue as the "main" glue, and hot glue to "tack" the pieces into place. (like on a long fuselage fold, I'll wood glue the channel, then a small dab of Hot Glue at each end and maybe one in the middle...)

Any spray paint will work on DTFB but make sure you spray it on LIGHTLY, let it dry, then spray another layer LIGHTLY. If the paper gets "wet" that's when it bubbles. But colored tape works just as well. Most of my DTFB stuff doesn't last long enough that I even bother :ROFLMAO:

From a build perspective vs performance? The FT3D is way way easier to build. It's cheaper to fly on the smaller powerplant setup and has more "real 3D" capability (in my opinion!) The Edge is a handful regarding the build (way more complex than "standard" FT planes) and flies more "sport" than "3D" at least in my fingers. (The FT3D flies closer to a flat plate foamy, where the Edge flies closer to real balsa, if that makes sense?)

For what you're after? Take your time and build the Edge and hang it up? You can always build another one for what, $5 in foam when you're comfortable with the sticks....no harm no foul.

Sorry, but for anyone thinking they are going to fly a cub once or twice and then fly an FT3D or Edge and have it survive? That's almost in the same line as "I wanted to learn 3D so I bought an all balsa Precision Aerobatics 63" Katana" - it just ends - poorly. Start with somethig like the FT3D, or cheap (value hobby is my favorite but you can cut your own from DTFB) flat-plate style foamies.

Along with a Stick, I think everyone should also have one of those to fly - it REALLY improves your stick dexterity, and who cares if you crash it, just pick it up, straighten the prop and toss it up again.
Brett_N first I appreciate your input greatly I can honestly say that you all have inspired me to have the most fun imaginable with out worrying about the heartbreak of a crash. I'm gonna build start the build for the ft edge probably tonight. That plane will hang up for a while. I just want to get better at building more complex planes the ft corsair is on my radar for a future build. The bdtfb does have a tendency to ball up instead of cutting that's why I'm making a new vertical stabilizer for my cub. I never thought about titebond glue I'm curious now. Again I appreciate all the feedback and encouragement you all make this fun. So keep up the excellent work fellas
 
#66
I really like @Brett_N reply to your thread.

My experience with painting: spray paint does not ruin it. If you saturate it with spray paint it can. But if you do it lightly and let it dry between coats it will be fine. I used to follow the idea of using minwax/polyurethane and did it on a few planes (it was actually mentioned in an early FT video).


It does work and adds a protective layer to the foam BUT it's not something you have to do. I did just fine with plain spray paint. I also used enamel paint and it works fine and I'm sure most crafts will be fine too. When in doubt, get some scrap foam and test it. Colored packing tape is a great option too.

As for plane choice/build. I've been sorta venturing out of Cub territory (I still like a good Cub though) and a plane that I tackled was the Bloody Baron. Very much like the Stik that Brett mentioned. Developed by Dan Sponholz (the guy behind the Flitetest free plans) and is geared at being a combat plane. It's a fun little plane and very quick to build too.
 
#67
(y)(y)

We're all here to help.

From a building to practice perspective.... (FWIW, I've only ever bought 1 FT Kit and that was the sea-duck, but I've built every single one of them...)

You've already built the Cub, I'd build up in the following order of complexity, even if you don't fly them:

1 - Bloody Wonder or Bloody Baron - good practice for cuts and folds, but not overly complex.
2 - The mini's - SE5 or the F22, or whatever - good practice working with single layer foam (great practice for different types of Glue)
2.a - even the BIG F22 (in the Sponz thread towards the end) has some complex cutting and flies great
3 - The Viggen - easiest intro into more complex shapes and it's a really really easy to fly starter EDF
4 - the Storch - great flyer aside, it's good practice for working with LARGE pieces of foam
5 - Arrow or Versa Wing - because everyone needs a wing or 2 in the hangar

Then I'd print out the Corsair on card-stock for templates. Cut out some of the more complex pieces, the wings, and practice the rolling techniques and creating the really complex stuff. This plane is harder (in my opinion) to build due to the curves than the Edge but the Edge has a ton of really small parts.

Another hint? Invest in an electric hot-knife that takes a #11 blade. Something like this one - these make complex curves a helluva lot easier.
 

Headbang

Well-known member
#68
Brett_N first I appreciate your input greatly I can honestly say that you all have inspired me to have the most fun imaginable with out worrying about the heartbreak of a crash. I'm gonna build start the build for the ft edge probably tonight. That plane will hang up for a while. I just want to get better at building more complex planes the ft corsair is on my radar for a future build. The bdtfb does have a tendency to ball up instead of cutting that's why I'm making a new vertical stabilizer for my cub. I never thought about titebond glue I'm curious now. Again I appreciate all the feedback and encouragement you all make this fun. So keep up the excellent work fellas
The edge is not so hard of a build, just more pieces then most ft designs. Flying on the other hand, a lot of plane for the inexperienced. I have not flown the ft edge, but have built one. I have flown a slowboat with the ft edge wing, and I do fly larger edges. The ft edge is a very pretty plane when done, will look good hanging for a while.
 
#69
The edge is not so hard of a build, just more pieces then most ft designs. Flying on the other hand, a lot of plane for the inexperienced. I have not flown the ft edge, but have built one. I have flown a slowboat with the ft edge wing, and I do fly larger edges. The ft edge is a very pretty plane when done, will look good hanging for a while.
Yes that is my plan because I want to hold on to it for a while so being a show piece wont shirt me a bit. Thanks Headbang for you input
 
#70
Stupid mistake was made yesterday I have a larger batteries that the suggested battery for more flight time but the power leads plug in with banana clips. I got the polarity wrong and fried my esc so not I'm have to wait for my order to come in. I'm so disappointed because I'm ready for this maiden. Just a careless mistake.
 
#71
Oh - I forgot to ask - where you oplanning to build the edge from scratch, or from a speedbuild kit?

There's quite a bit of wood framework involved - and it is required or the plane will tear itself apart (as I found out with the prototype LOL)
I was going to scratch building the plane. I was aware of the woodwork I think I can manage cutting the wood and everything
 
#72
Oh - I forgot to ask - where you oplanning to build the edge from scratch, or from a speedbuild kit?

There's quite a bit of wood framework involved - and it is required or the plane will tear itself apart (as I found out with the prototype LOL)
What woodwork are you talking about I only saw the popsicle sticks and the rear wheel support I didnt see that much as far as wood supporting the planes structure. Only if I'm missing something which is highly possible.
 
#75
What a night of building. I've gotten the fuselage about done. I have the horizontal and vertical stabilizers installed. That forming of the turtleback was pretty neat I put some tape for reinforcements it added a little weight but I'm confident with it. Next is the canopy and assembling the wings I'll have pictures when I get off tonight. I'm kinda impressed how big this plane is. Excited to finish it and then hang it.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#78
I think there are quite a few planes you should build before trying to fly that Edge; it’s a crazy responsive plane, and as others have mentioned, it’s not a beginner plane.

Simple Cub is great, a nice trainer to start off with; it’s a larger sized plane, which makes it a little harder to fly in a smaller area like a park or baseball field, is still great when you get it up in the air. You can see it easily (something I’ve had problems with when flying the smaller UMX/micro models), and the bigger planes tend to be a little more stable in the air.

I would throw out a Versa Wing as a fun build as well; they’re quick and easy to build, only require 2 sheets of foam, and a lot of people use them for flying combat and pylon racing, so you can still utilize it for multiple things after you’ve mastered it. And, they are pretty hardy. 😁