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New to Multi-Rotor build or buy?

#1
Hey guys I have a few questions for you multi rotor guys
A quick background I go on trips for my work and I spend several months in the middle of nowhere so I usually like to take something r/c with me as we have a lot of down time.
I want to try multi rotors this time around but I would like to know if it's better to build one suchs as an anycopter or hk450 or buy one rtf?
Also is there any differance between learning on a quad vs a tri?
I'm not new to R/C by any means i have built lots of planes/cars/boats over the years I tried a walkera flybarless heli on my last trip that thing was a piece of crap, so I want to make sure i get something that won't frustrate the hell out of me and has parts availibe so i can take plenty of spares with me(it takes around a month to recieve anything by mail).
Thanks for any help, R/C helps me keep my sanity during the down times.
All work and no play makes Rick a CRAZY person! :D
 

vk2dxn

Senior Member
#2
Build one for sure mate.
Nothing more satisfying than flying your own creation. ATM I only have a home mate tri based on the hobbyking X900 and I love it to bits
 
#3
There is a huge learning curve to pass when you build your own. It can be very frustrating, yet also very satisfying. I think it really depends on how much time you will be able to put into it.
 

FlyingMonkey

Stuck in Sunny FL
Staff member
Admin
#4
Hey guys I have a few questions for you multi rotor guys
A quick background I go on trips for my work and I spend several months in the middle of nowhere so I usually like to take something r/c with me as we have a lot of down time.
If travel is an issue, then you might want to look for either something small, or something that will break down, or fold down.

I want to try multi rotors this time around but I would like to know if it's better to build one suchs as an anycopter or hk450 or buy one rtf?
I prefer to build my own. This makes it easier to know when something goes wrong. But for someone who is brand new, it can be difficult, because you don't know if the reason the aircraft is flying badly, is because of something you put together/programmed wrong, or if there's a defective part.

Also is there any differance between learning on a quad vs a tri?
Yes and no. The tricopter tends to fly more like a plane. If you've flown helicopters, the tricopter flies more like a fixed pitch "honeybee" style helicopter, where the quad tends to feel more like a coaxial one. In both cases you need to learn to fly the rudder/tail.

I'm not new to R/C by any means i have built lots of planes/cars/boats over the years I tried a walkera flybarless heli on my last trip that thing was a piece of crap, so I want to make sure i get something that won't frustrate the hell out of me and has parts availibe so i can take plenty of spares with me(it takes around a month to recieve anything by mail).
The nice thing with one you've built yourself, is that you can bring individual parts and you know how to fix it.

That all being said, you might want to look at some of the RTF compact quads. For the price of a regular sized tricopter or quadcopter, transmitter, batteries, chargers, etc, you could buy a few of the micro quads, and have them as spares.

Something like the WL Toys V959 has very good reviews, it's compact, easy to fly and you can use it indoors and outdoors. It's light so crashes rarely break anything. Parts are readily available. And for the price of a repair of a regular sized quad, you could just about replace the micro one.

http://www.xheli.com/28h-wlv959-camera.html?gclid=CPS0_rmeybgCFVNo7AodmEkAFg


Thanks for any help, R/C helps me keep my sanity during the down times.
All work and no play makes Rick a CRAZY person! :D
 
#6
MassiveRC. The V202 is a great intro quad that takes a heap of abuse while you learn, and Romeo's responsiveness is unmatched. Get the quad, a couple extra batteries, an extra charger and an ac adapter or two and fly the pants off of it.
 
#8
well i took BrownEyedFool's advice and ordered a v202 from MassiveRC along with a few spares and a few batteries. If I can get the hang of flying these thing's I'll build one after I get home again.
Thanks everyone for the great advice
 
#9
You did exactly what I would have done. When learning to fly a new platform, in my limited experience, so far its been better to go with a known good flyer to start out with and then move to scratch building. Troubleshooting your skillset vs something wrong with the quad would be quite frustrating.