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Pumpkin drop event

New to RC planes

#1
Hi everyone. Looking to start in the hobby and hopefully make it a family thing. Picked up a txmtr from the local hobby shop and just ordered the mini simple scout quick build kit from the store today. Wondering what rcvr would work best with the DXe I was talked in to.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#4
You need a cord. I dislike the DXe because you can’t just set it up off an onboard screen or make on the fly adjustments, the app works but it’s added hassle vs other options. Many stores, and FT, default to recommending it without offering anything else. There’s now a number of sub $100 transmitters that are better.
You have it now so will need to learn to do that stuff.
It is fine once you get it hooked up, the usual Spektrum menus and fairly easy set up. I have only messed about with a friends one, there’s lots of happy DXe owners on here who will give you solid help too.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#7
If you are only using the phone to set it up then just buy the one for that.
I have no idea why it doesn’t ship with both cords, seeing as they are essential for operating the radio.
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#8
I use the DXe and like yourself it was offered to me without any other options, not knowing what's out there. I will be upgrading to the DX6 or DX8 later just for convenience of having the onboard screen. In your case you will need the cord, there is also an adapter that works via blue tooth that plugs into your radio. If you plan to use just your phone you will be limited to the option as the phone app isn't as detailed as the app for your laptop. I use the laptop only and it still hasn't got all the functions that an onboard screen would, mind you I haven't quite figured it out yet, need to play with it more. But all said and done it is a good Tx and has served me well in the beginner to intermediate stages.

The Lemon brand Rx's are a good choice, since you are starting out in the hobby you may want to pick up a few if these, they run about $15-20 depending on where you live or you can find them online. Just make sure they are DSMX compatible...
Tx.jpg
Like I said grab 3-4 as you will be crashing a lot and you may damage a couple, or you can easily use them designated to a couple different planes. Another huge suggestion would be to get a satellite receiver or two to accompany these Rx's to eliminate loss of signal mid flight. These pick up signal where the master Rx has lost it, it will save your planes immensely.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#9
I have had no loss of signal, right out to the limit of my vision and the altitude limit, without satellites. I have one large plane with a satellite in, rest are just running the standard RX on its own. I have 6 of these receivers in service at the moment, in minis, simple series, singles and twin engine planes.
If you place the antennas right and watch out for any damaged ones you should never have loss of signal issues just flying around the average field.
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#11
I have had no loss of signal, right out to the limit of my vision and the altitude limit, without satellites. I have one large plane with a satellite in, rest are just running the standard RX on its own. I have 6 of these receivers in service at the moment, in minis, simple series, singles and twin engine planes.
If you place the antennas right and watch out for any damaged ones you should never have loss of signal issues just flying around the average field.
I have had LOS issues more with the Spektrum Rx's but it has happened a few times with the Lemons. A couple times on my Scout, a couple times on my Bronco, once on my Spit, and a lot on the Shrubsmacker. On the Shrubsmacker it was a different Lemon Rx then what I am using now. The satellite s are just a layer of insurance that eliminates the possibility and will help you diagnose other issues by LOS not being the problem. I struggled as a new pilot in the beginning thinking I was doing something wrong in a lot of my crashes but it came down to LOS after my confidence was beat up lol. I eliminated the LOS and my piloting has grown exponentially. As a beginner I would say protect yourself
 

FDS

Well-known member
#12
That’s good advice, but you should aim to eliminate potential issues in the build stage by getting the RX and antenna positioned better.
If you have repeat LOs issues then a satellite will help but you should look elsewhere for the cause.
I have to say I don’t fly Spektrum, I used DSMX because I bought a Sport Cub S first, so you may be having issues with the transmitter that I haven’t had, since I run an Orange TX6i. It’s probably unfair of me to malign the DXe based on a few short flights and a look at the app.
It would be interesting to measure the performance of the transmitter antennas on the DXe with a few other radios, since so many people buy them.
I agree that as a beginner belt and braces is best, the Lemon RX and satellite is still about the same price as a single Spektrum branded receiver!
 

Bricks

Well-known member
#13
As much as I like my Spektrum DX9 I do believe part of the problem on the lower cost Spektrum radios is they use just a single transmitter antenna. Most folks like to point the transmitter at the plane which can cause issues as that is the weakest area of transmission.. I use a bunch of Lemon receivers and have never had a glitch, but I am also aware of how I place my receiver.
 

BATTLEAXE

Well-known member
#17
I just noticed a couple people talk about the placement of the receivers on the airframes. I have learned where to install mine mostly by trial and error and some advice from highly qualified experienced RC pilots. I have learned the hard way that communication from your transmitter to your receiver is priority number one before anything else, if your gear isn't talking to each other consistently it causes problems that could be hard to diagnose especially for a beginner who doesn't know what to look for. As I am now an intermediate RC pilot I am still learning as well, so if anyone who has already posted in this chat has any information that both of us can learn from it will benefit me as a tip and help save a beginner as you clearly stated such as yourself. Long story short I have a history of going through many planes due to crashing thinking it was something I was doing wrong on the sticks really was technical issues with my Tx/Rx communication. To save you the same hard lessons it would make sense to help you out before you crash and trash a dozen planes before you figure it out on your own.

I do have a few things I look for such as:
1. Make sure that your receiver has radio transparency, meaning hiding your Rx in the airframe to maintain a clean look to your plane can be hazardous to your signal. Example, some people use aluminum tape to make windows or shiny metal panels on the outside of the fuselage to look cool, but if your Rx is in behind this metal shield it has the possibility of losing signal rendering your plane a lawn dart.
2. Try to isolate your receiver from other electronics. Motors, ESC's, and even batteries can play around with your signal just by being in the vicinity of your receiver. I like to keep the majority of my electronics up in the front of the fuselage and the receiver is placed in behind the wing near the bottom of the plane to keep it separate from electromagnetic interference. I also run the wire antenna's to the outside of the airframe to give it every possible chance to receive the signals from your transmitter.
3. The use of satellite receivers give your master receiver an extra set of ears, as it were, to help that if your plane gets into an orientation that could possibly block the signal to your master receiver there is a back up to keep things in check. A good tip would be that if you are using a satellite receiver along with the master you should have one placed so the antenna runs horizontal to the airframe and the other runs vertical to cover all bases.

This is just a few things that i have learned and I am open to learn more. There are people that don't have issues with what's called "Loss Of Signal" with minimal effort or thought into receiver placement and others who strive to make it a priority. I found as a beginner builder and pilot I started out not thinking it was important because its one of the last things you install in the plane and I tended to just stuff it in where ever it fit and chuck it into the air. After time and numerous trashed planes i got frustrated and wanted to give up on the hobby because I couldn't get anything to fly. I got even more frustrated watching others on YouTube or on these forums make flying look so easy, until someone mentioned the problem I might be having was loss of signal and explained it to me. Since then I paid attention to it and my flying learning curve has grown exponentially with a lot of success. Now I try to fly once or twice a day and I am confident I can fly anything I build.

So in conclusion, I just thought this would be a great opportunity for us both to learn, that's all.
 

The Hangar

Well-known member
#18
As much as I like my Spektrum DX9 I do believe part of the problem on the lower cost Spektrum radios is they use just a single transmitter antenna. Most folks like to point the transmitter at the plane which can cause issues as that is the weakest area of transmission.. I use a bunch of Lemon receivers and have never had a glitch, but I am also aware of how I place my receiver.
I have the dx6e and have never had any range issues regarding the transmitter. I have had issues but those were definitely because of the receivers (Spektrum and orangerx).