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New to the forum.

#1
Hello everyone, I am new here. I am looking to get back into the hobby after many years. Something simple and easy that I can fly with my grandson. I would like some input. Thank you very much.
 
#2
Any particular budget? I know a few of us started out with the WLToys F949 as it's a cheap and sturdy 3 channel that's RTF (Ready To Fly). For around $50, it's not a bad starter. It has 2 modes (I think, might be 3 lol) and the beginner mode is very docile. Best in 5 MPH or below, gets a little floaty and harder to control outside that. At about 10 MPH flying into the wind, it pretty much stands still, if not flying backwards. Occasionally you'll need to bend some parts back into shape and the landing gear on mine was worthless. Mine is hand launch only after breaking off a wheel. Thankfully it's super easy to launch that way though.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#4
If you're wanting something to build, I'd recommend either a Simple Cub or Simple Scout - they're easy fliers, and relatively easy to build, especially with the FliteTest build videos available. They're also very stable in the air, and you can still fly them acrobatically, provided you don't push it TOO hard (really hard G-force turns can cause wings to fold up and end your flying, but that can happen with any plane).

If you are wanting a solid performing ready-to-fly plane, I'd highly recommend the Apprentice S-15e. While it is a little higher in price, having a $300 price tag for the RTF version, it is a SOLID plane to learn with and even grow with. Our club uses them almost exclusively to teach people how to fly, since they have a great glide slope and are incredibly stable in the air. In fact, several of our club members still fly them for warm ups for their bigger planes, and our fixed wing chairman loves to make low inverted passes over the runway with one. :)

In addition, the radio that comes with the Ready-to-Fly version is a DXe, which, with programming, will allow you to switch out to numerous other Spektrum planes to fly. It's not the BEST radio for Spektrum receivers, but it's a great starter radio and will even allow you to use it for buddy boxing, or connect to a new plane that you might have built, like one of the aforementioned FliteTest planes. :)
 
#5
If you're wanting something to build, I'd recommend either a Simple Cub or Simple Scout - they're easy fliers, and relatively easy to build, especially with the FliteTest build videos available. They're also very stable in the air, and you can still fly them acrobatically, provided you don't push it TOO hard (really hard G-force turns can cause wings to fold up and end your flying, but that can happen with any plane).

If you are wanting a solid performing ready-to-fly plane, I'd highly recommend the Apprentice S-15e. While it is a little higher in price, having a $300 price tag for the RTF version, it is a SOLID plane to learn with and even grow with. Our club uses them almost exclusively to teach people how to fly, since they have a great glide slope and are incredibly stable in the air. In fact, several of our club members still fly them for warm ups for their bigger planes, and our fixed wing chairman loves to make low inverted passes over the runway with one. :)

In addition, the radio that comes with the Ready-to-Fly version is a DXe, which, with programming, will allow you to switch out to numerous other Spektrum planes to fly. It's not the BEST radio for Spektrum receivers, but it's a great starter radio and will even allow you to use it for buddy boxing, or connect to a new plane that you might have built, like one of the aforementioned FliteTest planes. :)
Thank you so much for the info. The price is a bit out of my range though. I did download the Flite Test cub plans. Will see how that goes. Maybe I can find some radio gear on sale.
 
#7
Any particular budget? I know a few of us started out with the WLToys F949 as it's a cheap and sturdy 3 channel that's RTF (Ready To Fly). For around $50, it's not a bad starter. It has 2 modes (I think, might be 3 lol) and the beginner mode is very docile. Best in 5 MPH or below, gets a little floaty and harder to control outside that. At about 10 MPH flying into the wind, it pretty much stands still, if not flying backwards. Occasionally you'll need to bend some parts back into shape and the landing gear on mine was worthless. Mine is hand launch only after breaking off a wheel. Thankfully it's super easy to launch that way though.
Thank you. That sounds about right for my price range. I am not a stranger to hand launched models. Flew gassers for the National Guard as targets in the 90's. Things sure have changed. Again thank you.
 
#11
Im a new guy too, and bought this radio.

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/turnigy-tgy-i6-afhds-transmitter-and-6ch-receiver-mode-2.html

Seems to be ok so far, and the price was right for the radio and receiver.
I built the Tiny Trainer, and have crashed more that I have flown, but its been a hoot.
And for a few bucks worth of foam board, the price is certainly right. Once I got mine built my opinion of the toughness of the foam board went up. Much stronger once assembled. After turning my plane into an RC yard dart a time or two, Im convinced the foam is *mostly* me proof. Which is saying a lot. I excel at breaking stuff.
And do tell about shooting down RC planes, please.
 
#14
We shot at a few back in the late 80s down at Ft. Hood TX. Used the 50 cal (commander's weapon) on the M1 Abrams (anti air practice)
I always thought that would be like the BEST mos ever to be a drone pilot!! Correct me if I'm wrong @STEPHENWYLIE , but they must have had about a 10' wingspan?!
Well, thank you for your service. If the targets were red, big and made a lot of noise, then they were most likely what we called an RCAT. FLEW one once. Mostly was lunch and recovery (if there was any thing to recover).
 
#15
If you're wanting something to build, I'd recommend either a Simple Cub or Simple Scout - they're easy fliers, and relatively easy to build, especially with the FliteTest build videos available. They're also very stable in the air, and you can still fly them acrobatically, provided you don't push it TOO hard (really hard G-force turns can cause wings to fold up and end your flying, but that can happen with any plane).

If you are wanting a solid performing ready-to-fly plane, I'd highly recommend the Apprentice S-15e. While it is a little higher in price, having a $300 price tag for the RTF version, it is a SOLID plane to learn with and even grow with. Our club uses them almost exclusively to teach people how to fly, since they have a great glide slope and are incredibly stable in the air. In fact, several of our club members still fly them for warm ups for their bigger planes, and our fixed wing chairman loves to make low inverted passes over the runway with one. :)

In addition, the radio that comes with the Ready-to-Fly version is a DXe, which, with programming, will allow you to switch out to numerous other Spektrum planes to fly. It's not the BEST radio for Spektrum receivers, but it's a great starter radio and will even allow you to use it for buddy boxing, or connect to a new plane that you might have built, like one of the aforementioned FliteTest planes. :)
Thanks for the info.
 

kilroy07

Well-known member
#16
Well, thank you for your service. If the targets were red, big and made a lot of noise, then they were most likely what we called an RCAT. FLEW one once. Mostly was lunch and recovery (if there was any thing to recover).
You too!
As I remember them (it was quite awhile ago... :LOL:) they were white, high wing standard drone looking planes... ("maybe" an H tail?...) :unsure:

While we expended QUITE a lot of ammo.... I wasn't ever sure we ever hit them...
Then I saw on in the back of a pickup truck once... looked to be styrofoam, MUCH bigger that I thought (maybe a 4 cylinder engine on front?...) and full of holes! :ROFLMAO: (Not sure those .50 cal rounds even slowed down when they punched straight through the foam!)
We probably would have to have sawed the thing in half to bring it down.

Was hands down everyone's favorite training (second to main gun training of course...)
 
#17
You too!
As I remember them (it was quite awhile ago... :LOL:) they were white, high wing standard drone looking planes... ("maybe" an H tail?...) :unsure:

While we expended QUITE a lot of ammo.... I wasn't ever sure we ever hit them...
Then I saw on in the back of a pickup truck once... looked to be styrofoam, MUCH bigger that I thought (maybe a 4 cylinder engine on front?...) and full of holes! :ROFLMAO: (Not sure those .50 cal rounds even slowed down when they punched straight through the foam!)
We probably would have to have sawed the thing in half to bring it down.

Was hands down everyone's favorite training (second to main gun training of course...)
It as my experience that as long as the electronics or motor were not hit, the airplane would still fly. Did see a few of the RCATs get hit and nose dive into the grown or just fly off into the sunset. Would be interesting to look around the area and see if any could be found. This was at Donna Anna Range. Not sure what it is called now.
 
#18
If you want to tackle building (your grandson might really get into helping!) check out FlySky i6x for a nice (very capable) radio. Should come with the 6 channel receiver for around $55-60.
Here it is on amazon for $54;
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07H5C5PHK/?tag=lstir-20
Im a new guy too, and bought this radio.

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/turnigy-tgy-i6-afhds-transmitter-and-6ch-receiver-mode-2.html

Seems to be ok so far, and the price was right for the radio and receiver.
I built the Tiny Trainer, and have crashed more that I have flown, but its been a hoot.
And for a few bucks worth of foam board, the price is certainly right. Once I got mine built my opinion of the toughness of the foam board went up. Much stronger once assembled. After turning my plane into an RC yard dart a time or two, Im convinced the foam is *mostly* me proof. Which is saying a lot. I excel at breaking stuff.
And do tell about shooting down RC planes, please.
I will sure look into that. We flew a 4 cylinder aircraft with about a 10 foot wing span. it was rail launched with rocket packets. It pulled a banner for the gun crews to track and shot at. They were using a unit called a Duster. It had 4 50 Cal machine guns on it. Later on when the RCATs got to few and expensive, we switched over to a foam aircraft with about a 4 foot wing span that could be tracked on Infrared and shot ad with M16s. Lots of fun.
 
#19
Sorry all. Thanks for your replies. I am having a little bit of trouble in keeping up with the way the forum works. If I did not reply to anyone, please forgive me. I am just so confused. LOL.