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New to the hobby and need help for a tricopter

#1
Hi from france :D

so im kind of new to this hobby, i actually stumbled upon flite test videos when searching for how a servo motor worked. anyways got looking at all those scratch build planes and made a couple of them. I have ordered the necessary electronics for a powerpod and am now waiting for a RX since i burnt out the one that i had ordered. Should of read the instructions. :p

so i have not been able to fly one of the scratchbuild planes i made, yet.

went into a rc store here in france and the guy showed me a quadricoptor which was pretty cool and seemed a little more easier to learn how to fly. so here i am and i have read through a couple threads including this one: http://rcexplorer.se/projects/2011/09/the-tricopter-v2-5/

and i love the concept. But i have a couple questions:

1) can i use the TX and RX i got from hobby king? this is the one i bought when ordering parts for the plane http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=16239

i have no idea if you have to have a different type of controller or not, would prefer (to keep costs down) ans use this one if possible. If not then ill get the one i need :p

2) im not looking for a huge tricopter but just something big enough and powerfull enough to lift a go pro. I checked out the list of parts needed at the bottom of that link but im wondering if it could be overkill for a beginner?

3) what are the differences in performance between a tri and a quad?


If i can get some help on everything needed then i could start ordering :D ans then building



thanks

nick
 

rcspaceflight

creator of virtual planes
#2
Your questions are rather vague but it sounds like you don't know much about multirotors.

Simply put, you can use any Tx/Rx system and that hooks up to a control board. The control board has gyros in it that self right the craft and also converts the Tx/Rx inputs into the right variations in speed for the 3 or 4 motors. There is a wide variety of control boards and some of them are very reasonably priced. From the control board you need to hook up as many ESCs as you have motors. One battery will be hooked up to all of the ESCs but you only want to use one BEC in the multiple ESCs. I know it's all rather confusing. Basically, each ESC has three wires. Usually a red, white, and a black wire that goes into the control board. You only want to use one of the red wires to be plugged into the control board.

There are different flying characteristics between the quad and the tri but the quad is much easier to build and find the right parts for. Simply because the tri requires a servo to move the rear motor side to side. The quad is just four motors. You don't have to mess with a hinge set up for one of the motors and getting a high quality servo. I think the tri can turn sharper and moves more fluid like and smoothly turns and corners, but it's not a huge difference in flying.

With 20 articles, this author has a lot of videos to watch, but I've seen a few and they're great. I strongly recommend watching all of them. http://flitetest.com/authors/eluminerRC

I don't know enough about multirotors to know what control board and motors to recommend. But any control board should work, some certainly are better than others.
 
#3
Thanks, no actually i dont know anything about rc flying in general. just what i have seen on the beginner vids from flite test.

the build videos have some nice info too but thats about all i know. In fact i think the fact that you have to use only one of those red wires is in the h quadcopter build...

how does the rx hook up too the control board? just like you hook up a servo?


will check out the link you posted

thx
 

rcspaceflight

creator of virtual planes
#4
I believe you use male to male servo leads to connect the Rx to the control board. So, in a way it's just like how you hook up a servo.

There is a lot of great info out there. Flite Test's videos on the H-quad and the Knuckles quad are some great videos that shows some of the info. But those articles I linked to are great too. Focus on his quad building series first.
 
#6
So i just watched the videos and its quite simple to do, only thing i dont get is the transmiter and receiver part of the setup. He uses a turnigy 9X with a FrSky 2.4 GHz module and receiver combo, which he plugs straight into the back of his transmitter... I dont have that on my http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...dProduct=16239


Is that peice of equipment optional or not?

If i need a new radio and receiver what do i need too look for in one for this project?
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#7
The module is only needed for certain radios. If your transmitter does not have the module bay on the rear, you do not need it.
 

rcspaceflight

creator of virtual planes
#8
Higher quality Tx have moduals so they can bind with more planes and Rx. It's just another feature that some Tx have, but it's not something you need.
 
#9
so you guys can confirm that my cheap hobby king radio will work for a copter?

I priced up all the parts for the build in that video and it gets close too the 180€ mark.

Is there a alternative motor that i can use that is maybe cheaper ? maybe less powerfull ?

I dont want to spend alot on the first one since it will probably crash more than fly =P. I wa thinking around 140 to 150 €


these are the motors used in the setup: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbycity/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idproduct=25084.html

they are rated at 1200KV, could i get motors with lower KV?


PS: on the controller description its written it can only be used for fixed wing use
 
Last edited:

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#10
Fiesta,

Don't worry too much about the TX -- as far as it's concerend it is flying an airplane. On multirotors the control board is really flying the plane, you're just giving it instructions via radio, typically with connections to the sticks in the same way a fixed wing would. On the flip side, if you can afford it, the TX and batttery charger are the two things that almost never break in a crash - investing more here and less in the airframe is usually a wise move, but we all have to live and pay with the choices we make.

As for motors, those are pretty powerful for a first multi. The kv has trends in more powerful motors, but by itself it only tells you how fast they'll spin unloaded, not how much power/thrust they'll actually deliver. If you keep the frame light, you can easily get away with the blue wonder style motors (AKA: CD motors, 2730s, or 24g motors -- they have quite a heritage). I'd recomend picking the 1300kv version with an 8" slow-fly prop -- You should be able to get around 600g thrust out of them on 3S.

For a tri I would size full AUW per motor (3:1 thrust-to-weight ratio), and a quad 1/2 AUW per motor (2:1) for sizing minimum thrust or maximum airframe weight -- in this case a Blue wonder'd tri, I'd keep AUW under 600G, for a quad, maximum AUW of 1200g. there's plenty of fudge factor in that, especially on the tri.

There are plenty of other motor options out there, but those should cost you around $10 per motor and $10 per ESC (I recomend plush 10s or plush 12s for those). $20 for a single power system is hard to beat.

For your earlier question of tri vs. quad . . . I'd stear clear of a tri for a first airframe. it is a bit harder to fly, but not impossibly so, and can be harder to build right, but to get a good tri you need to shell out for a quiality metal gear servo and you're back up to the cost of a 4th power system.

That and 4 motors has fewer parts to break compared to three motors and a servo (with tilt mechanism) Swingback arms can help in the case of sudden contact with tera firma, but one sold tap on that rear motor will damage most tilt mechanisms and can take out even metal gear servos with it.

A good quad is by far more resiliant than any equally good tri, for this reason, and resialnt is what you need to learn on!

don't like the flat flying charicetersitics and slow yaw? Look into a V-tail -- just as resiliant and still turns on a dime. They're not as efficinet, but I've got mine set on 20 degree mounts instead of the typical 40 degree, and get snappy yaw with about 6% loss on the rear motors. Best part, the diffrence between a V-tail and a traditional quad is a few setting changes and a few tweaks on the airframe -- you can build a quad first, and when you're ready to step up to more agressive flight charicteristics, make the mods and switch to a V-tail.

BTW, Welcome to the Forum!
 
#11
Fiesta,

Don't worry too much about the TX -- as far as it's concerend it is flying an airplane. On multirotors the control board is really flying the plane, you're just giving it instructions via radio, typically with connections to the sticks in the same way a fixed wing would. On the flip side, if you can afford it, the TX and batttery charger are the two things that almost never break in a crash - investing more here and less in the airframe is usually a wise move, but we all have to live and pay with the choices we make.
Did you mean a Receiver and a battery? i don't see how the TX and charger could be damaged...
For now i have these:
TX ad RX: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=16239
battery I have: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=9275
battery charger: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=7637

- As for the frame i am making the anyquad Hub with wood booms. It will be well, free as i have all i need. printed the plans and will finish making it this week.
- I am basically mimicking the weight of the flite test quadcopter setup, the aluminium plates ill use for the hub will be drilled out to match up or be even lighter (maybe). the Hub is at 0.20lbs = 90grammes. i am currently, with 2 13cm aluminium disc, at a weight of 120grammes. I still need to drill out the middle part of the disc wich will probably cut the weight into half. so around 60 to 70grammes for a DIY HUB.
- The booms are wood, I'm going to drill a nice hole design along th booms to lighten them up. Might make them a little fragile but i can always replace them =P.

As for motors, those are pretty powerful for a first multi. The kv has trends in more powerful motors, but by itself it only tells you how fast they'll spin unloaded, not how much power/thrust they'll actually deliver. If you keep the frame light, you can easily get away with the blue wonder style motors (AKA: CD motors, 2730s, or 24g motors -- they have quite a heritage). I'd recomend picking the 1300kv version with an 8" slow-fly prop -- You should be able to get around 600g thrust out of them on 3S.
Is this a good choice? I need to order everything from Hobby king since they dont have the blue wonder i found the equivalent...
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__2069__hexTronik_24gram_Brushless_Outrunner_1300kv.html
under your recommendations for beginning ill start with a quad =)

as for the props, i saw that i need two CW props and two CCW props am i right?
For a tri I would size full AUW per motor (3:1 thrust-to-weight ratio), and a quad 1/2 AUW per motor (2:1) for sizing minimum thrust or maximum airframe weight -- in this case a Blue wonder'd tri, I'd keep AUW under 600G, for a quad, maximum AUW of 1200g. there's plenty of fudge factor in that, especially on the tri. There are plenty of other motor options out there, but those should cost you around $10 per motor and $10 per ESC (I recomend plush 10s or plush 12s for those). $20 for a single power system is hard to beat.
- So if i undrstand this correctly: the motor i just linked above is at 400g of thrust so i must build a copter under 800grammes in total?
- could i use these ESC's? http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...ar_10_Amp_Multi_rotor_Brushless_ESC_2_3S.html

I saw they were used for multirotors... but have also seen people flashing their ESC for bettr reaction time (i think)

Whats the best? or in my case the easiest for a beginner?


For your earlier question of tri vs. quad . . . I'd stear clear of a tri for a first airframe. it is a bit harder to fly, but not impossibly so, and can be harder to build right, but to get a good tri you need to shell out for a quiality metal gear servo and you're back up to the cost of a 4th power system. That and 4 motors has fewer parts to break compared to three motors and a servo (with tilt mechanism) Swingback arms can help in the case of sudden contact with tera firma, but one sold tap on that rear motor will damage most tilt mechanisms and can take out even metal gear servos with it.

A good quad is by far more resiliant than any equally good tri, for this reason, and resialnt is what you need to learn on!
yep, totally spot on with that, i actually thought about the fact that it would cost basically the same. Had not thought about the more breakable peices. thanks, will go for a quad.

BTW, Welcome to the Forum!
Thanks =)
 
Last edited:

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#12
Did you mean a Receiver and a battery? i don't see how the TX and charger could be damaged...
Precisely my point. Some folks refer to our airframes as having experation dates -- if you fly, you will crash, and if you crash, eventualy it'll become unrepairable. The TX and charger are well worth spending a bit more than minimum becasue they'll last you the longest unharmed.

Which TX you pick is up to you and "which is best?" is a religious question -- everyone has their own answers, most are based on fact+belief and they've all got some things right and a few things wrong. Off the cuff, I've recomended the Orange T-six, the Turnegy 9x or 9xr, the Spektrum Dx6i or Dx7s, or the Tarranis, but the one that you've picked will work in this case -- but expect to replace it within the next airframe or two.

I would highly recomend getting another charger. I know, the price looks right, but you don't want to skimp too much on the charger -- at best, a bad one will wear out your batteries early, at worst, it can make your batteries burst into flame. look at something like the accucell6 or the eco6 -- they're both programmable and quite a bit safer to operate. you'll also need to pick up a power supply, which you can scrounge to find (with no added risk) , or pick up the one HK sells for $10 -- bringing the charger/supply to around $40 (I know, 10x more, but it's worth it!).

for the blue wonders, that's a pretty small pack to feed all 4 -- Still your choice, but I wouldn't go any smaller than a 30C 3S 1500mah pack, and enocourage you to think nice thoughts about the 2200mah pack (I know, 3x more, but 2 minute flight times are no fun for anyone). Also consider getting multiple packs.

- As for the frame i am making the anyquad Hub with wood booms. It will be well, free as i have all i need. printed the plans and will finish making it this week.
- I am basically mimicking the weight of the flite test quadcopter setup, the aluminium plates ill use for the hub will be drilled out to match up or be even lighter (maybe). the Hub is at 0.20lbs = 90grammes. i am currently, with 2 13cm aluminium disc, at a weight of 120grammes. I still need to drill out the middle part of the disc wich will probably cut the weight into half. so around 60 to 70grammes for a DIY HUB.
- The booms are wood, I'm going to drill a nice hole design along th booms to lighten them up. Might make them a little fragile but i can always replace them =P.
interesting. I'd think the aluminum plate would be heavier that 1/4" hobby plywood, but worth a try. keep working the weight budget and you should have a feel of what your thrust/weight ratio is to keep it airborne.

Is this a good choice? I need to order everything from Hobby king since they dont have the blue wonder i found the equivalent...
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__2069__hexTronik_24gram_Brushless_Outrunner_1300kv.html
Yeah, that's the motor I'm refering to. They're all modled after old CD drive motors that people were scrapping together for early brushless electric motors on light airframes, whihc is why they're popular and have so many names. It really is amazing -- that design wroks so well, it's stuck around even after several years of further development!

Those should do fine. My knee jerk is to the plush series, but nothing wrong with those. Do buy them in sets if you don't plan on reflashing them. subtle diffrences between batches/revisions would be invisible . . . until you got it in the air.
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#13
Did you mean a Receiver and a battery? i don't see how the TX and charger could be damaged...
They usually are never damaged in a crash unless the crash is really spectacular and involves you as well...
They can be dropped and such. As always, the expensive electronics are the most vulnerable to our whoops moments!
 
#14
-Thanks, since i already have a TX and a RX (which should arrive anytime soon) I will just use this one untill it doesnt work anymore or if i want to get a better one=). I will be getting more battery packs, since the one i have i would like to keep for the plane. Will look into the chargers aswell.

- As for the aluminimum well if im not mistaken the plywood would be 6mm thick (sorry metric im in Europe lol ) and the aluminium plate i have is 3mm so i gain some weight there. And the dics i cut out are actually larger than 13cm like the plans from flite test.

knowing that i will be using aluminium plates will this create any problems with vibrations? I have seen that people are doing things so that they minimize the vibrations around the control board for better operation... i would think.... ?

Speeking of control boards which one should i go for?

- If i go for the plush series from turnigy will i have to flash the ESC's or can i use them as they are? Is it bad to use a higher AMP rated ESC?

The hextronic 24g motors have a maximum load of 7.5A, i could use a 10A ESC which should be fine, but what if i have like a 20Amp already and use that, or if i want a 20 AMP now so that i can upgrade the motors later on... ? would it impact the motor? or will it waste a part of my battery pack ?


Will get a parts list up before i order so that you guys can tell me if i need anything else or will be ordering something wrong.

ill also post pictures of the frame building to see what you guys think. I will simply get the SK450 PCB to put on it so i can follow the tutorials posted for the SK450 copter. That and it makes it look realy really tidy. unless there is another great solution ?
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#15
You'll want to isolate your control board for vibe regardless of the material you pick -- unless you make the whole structure out of EPP, which works, but it's hard to take a pool-noodle quad seriously ;) The board needs a clear picture of how the platform is moving, but vibe enters as error, confusing the board with funky numbers. many fly without isolation, but the experience is greatly improved with it. at a minimum mount the board with double sided foam tape.

For the I would recommend the KK2 for a good first board, but availability is sketchy ATM -- story I keep hearing is they're trying to rev the board, and hit quality issues with the OEM. don't want to buy a dead board, no mater how fancy it is, but I still wish HK would get their act together on this. I've heard the multiwii boards are nice, but from what I hear are complicated for the initial setup.

Flashing the ESCs is up to you -- it's a complicated step, but might be necessary if the ESCs aren't matched in performance. Faster response is nice, but as long as it's the same slower response you should be able to live with it.

ESCs are sized by the maximum amperage they can control. Anything above what the motor draws will only be wasted capability and extra weight/cost -- it's not going to pass more current than the motor is drawing on it's own. If you've already got the heavier ESCs, or crazy plans to upgrade the motors, I wouldn't worry about it and work on trimming weight elsewhere.

If you're going for the less expensive lower power motors, keep that extra weight of anything you add in mind -- not saying don't do any one thing, just keep a tally to stay under that target AUW.
 
#16
I count on using foam between the plates and the wood booms to minimize that and yeah also saw that you should put some foam under the board.

The KK2 is on back order for now. I wonder if by chance i can find it here in france. ( which i doubt )will have to search for that.

i dont have any ESC's well one for the plane but its already in use so ill get new ones. Probably go for the multistar though, you talked about getting the same batch of ESC's how can i ensure that i do? just order 4 of them at the same time or ask Hobby king to choose 4 of the same batch?


Besides having fun with this copter, I would like to put a go pro on it, the overall weight is around 182 Grams if i use the hard case around it. How can i know that i wont be too heavy? I guess i should just add it too the overall weight and see if i need bigger motors?

If so do you have a motor to recommend? ( a little more powerfull than the HeXtronic 24g /bluewonder ) so that i will be able touse the copter with a go pro


Also the propellers do i need 2 CW and 2 CCW?


thanks for the help =)
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#17
i dont have any ESC's well one for the plane but its already in use so ill get new ones. Probably go for the multistar though, you talked about getting the same batch of ESC's how can i ensure that i do? just order 4 of them at the same time or ask Hobby king to choose 4 of the same batch?
Just order them at the same time. Manufacturing varience isn't as significant as revision variance -- they might have revised the firmware between the ESC bought three months ago and the one ordered today. That'll affect your responsiveness more than anything else, and consitant firmware would be the only thing you could "fix" by reflashing to an open firmware.

Besides having fun with this copter, I would like to put a go pro on it, the overall weight is around 182 Grams if i use the hard case around it. How can i know that i wont be too heavy? I guess i should just add it too the overall weight and see if i need bigger motors?

If so do you have a motor to recommend? ( a little more powerfull than the HeXtronic 24g /bluewonder ) so that i will be able touse the copter with a go pro
Was afraid you might go there . . . everyone wants a gopro! ;)

Frankly, cheap and payload are competing goals.

The Blue Wonder style motor will be pushing it for a gopro payload, but it can be done. If you kept the airframe extreamly light, you could pull the AUW down enough to tollerate the weight penalty of the camera -- even a gopro. Just keep in mind, the more resiliant materials are heavier or more expensive. wood is cheap and light but fragile, plastic is resiliant but heavy, CF is pricy and strong but brittle.

Want payload without considering budget? Well you were already looking at the 28-26 1200kv, right? They're what I'm using, but double the cost of the 2370's and expect quite a bit more power draw -- I wouldn't recomend anything less than a 3s2200 battery for a quad built with these.

What I'd recommend -- learn to fly first. Don't get caught up in the "I'll just buy this and I'll be good forever" lie we all tell ourselves. Yes, think forward, but build a simple platform you can learn on first. Before you risk a $200-400 camera, loaded with the weight of a waterproof shock case, learn to control the platform. Once you've gotten to the point you fly comfortably enough to try the gopro without it's case, you'll be free of that extra weight.

If that's too far off for you, consider getting a lighter/cheaper camera. The 808 #16 and Mobius cameras scarcely weight anything at all, and generate fairly good footage -- all for a fraction of the cost. That and if you've got the payload budget for a gopro left, but you use one of those instead, you've got payload budget left for FPV gear.

Also the propellers do i need 2 CW and 2 CCW?
At any one time, but I always recommend a *minimum* of 3 sets (6CW, 6CCW), and consider getting more. Props are consumable items on multis and you should buy cheap (but not too cheap) props and let them break in a crash. If the prop doesn't break in a hard prop strike, it could get dinged or worse, damage the motor. dinged props are vibrating props and you want to minimize anything that vibrates on a multi. Better to let it break from cheapness on a prop strike and replace with a nice new balanced prop.
 
#18
Just order them at the same time. Manufacturing varience isn't as significant as revision variance -- they might have revised the firmware between the ESC bought three months ago and the one ordered today. That'll affect your responsiveness more than anything else, and consitant firmware would be the only thing you could "fix" by reflashing to an open firmware.



Was afraid you might go there . . . everyone wants a gopro! ;)

Frankly, cheap and payload are competing goals.

The Blue Wonder style motor will be pushing it for a gopro payload, but it can be done. If you kept the airframe extreamly light, you could pull the AUW down enough to tollerate the weight penalty of the camera -- even a gopro. Just keep in mind, the more resiliant materials are heavier or more expensive. wood is cheap and light but fragile, plastic is resiliant but heavy, CF is pricy and strong but brittle.

Want payload without considering budget? Well you were already looking at the 28-26 1200kv, right? They're what I'm using, but double the cost of the 2370's and expect quite a bit more power draw -- I wouldn't recomend anything less than a 3s2200 battery for a quad built with these.

What I'd recommend -- learn to fly first. Don't get caught up in the "I'll just buy this and I'll be good forever" lie we all tell ourselves. Yes, think forward, but build a simple platform you can learn on first. Before you risk a $200-400 camera, loaded with the weight of a waterproof shock case, learn to control the platform. Once you've gotten to the point you fly comfortably enough to try the gopro without it's case, you'll be free of that extra weight.

If that's too far off for you, consider getting a lighter/cheaper camera. The 808 #16 and Mobius cameras scarcely weight anything at all, and generate fairly good footage -- all for a fraction of the cost. That and if you've got the payload budget for a gopro left, but you use one of those instead, you've got payload budget left for FPV gear.



At any one time, but I always recommend a *minimum* of 3 sets (6CW, 6CCW), and consider getting more. Props are consumable items on multis and you should buy cheap (but not too cheap) props and let them break in a crash. If the prop doesn't break in a hard prop strike, it could get dinged or worse, damage the motor. dinged props are vibrating props and you want to minimize anything that vibrates on a multi. Better to let it break from cheapness on a prop strike and replace with a nice new balanced prop.
Well the go pro idea is actually my brothers, he has one but your correct he would kill me if it broke haha. He had the idea since snow boarding season has arrived and wanted film from the air instead of the go pro on the board like usual.

I think i have all my qustions answered ill be getting a ist up and run it by you if thats okay?

continuuig the frame as we speak =)
 
#19
Just order them at the same time. Manufacturing varience isn't as significant as revision variance -- they might have revised the firmware between the ESC bought three months ago and the one ordered today. That'll affect your responsiveness more than anything else, and consitant firmware would be the only thing you could "fix" by reflashing to an open firmware.



Was afraid you might go there . . . everyone wants a gopro! ;)

Frankly, cheap and payload are competing goals.

The Blue Wonder style motor will be pushing it for a gopro payload, but it can be done. If you kept the airframe extreamly light, you could pull the AUW down enough to tollerate the weight penalty of the camera -- even a gopro. Just keep in mind, the more resiliant materials are heavier or more expensive. wood is cheap and light but fragile, plastic is resiliant but heavy, CF is pricy and strong but brittle.

Want payload without considering budget? Well you were already looking at the 28-26 1200kv, right? They're what I'm using, but double the cost of the 2370's and expect quite a bit more power draw -- I wouldn't recomend anything less than a 3s2200 battery for a quad built with these.

What I'd recommend -- learn to fly first. Don't get caught up in the "I'll just buy this and I'll be good forever" lie we all tell ourselves. Yes, think forward, but build a simple platform you can learn on first. Before you risk a $200-400 camera, loaded with the weight of a waterproof shock case, learn to control the platform. Once you've gotten to the point you fly comfortably enough to try the gopro without it's case, you'll be free of that extra weight.

If that's too far off for you, consider getting a lighter/cheaper camera. The 808 #16 and Mobius cameras scarcely weight anything at all, and generate fairly good footage -- all for a fraction of the cost. That and if you've got the payload budget for a gopro left, but you use one of those instead, you've got payload budget left for FPV gear.



At any one time, but I always recommend a *minimum* of 3 sets (6CW, 6CCW), and consider getting more. Props are consumable items on multis and you should buy cheap (but not too cheap) props and let them break in a crash. If the prop doesn't break in a hard prop strike, it could get dinged or worse, damage the motor. dinged props are vibrating props and you want to minimize anything that vibrates on a multi. Better to let it break from cheapness on a prop strike and replace with a nice new balanced prop.
Well the go pro idea is actually my brothers, he has one but your correct he would kill me if it broke haha. He had the idea since snow boarding season has arrived and wanted film from the air instead of the go pro on the board like usual.

I think i have all my qustions answered ill be getting a ist up and run it by you if thats okay?

continuuig the frame as we speak =)
 
#20
so here is the list im lucky th european warehouse that ships to france has the KK2 =P meaning i will order it straight away to be sure to get one. And order the rest of the stuff from the international warehouse.

Here it goes:

PCB450: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__25488__Hobbyking_SK450_Lower_PCB_Main_Frame.html
Motors (4each): http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__2069__hexTronik_24gram_Brushless_Outrunner_1300kv.html
ESC: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...ar_10_Amp_Multi_rotor_Brushless_ESC_2_3S.html
battery: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__9394__Turnigy_2200mAh_3S_30C_Lipo_Pack.html
Getting a SK450 frame if im not happy with the one im making
KK2 : http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...r_LCD_Flight_Control_Board_EU_warehouse_.html
TURNIGY BESC: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__2169__TURNIGY_BESC_Programming_Card.html
Propellers: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__562__501__Multi_Rotors_Parts-Propellers.html


please let me know if i have forgoteen anything or something wrong like the specs between motor, ESC and battery =) ?


Thanks for the great help