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Help! Old futuba radio

#1
Hey
I bought an old futaba PCM 1024z, and i dont know how to link it to the receiver, can you guys help with that.
 
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FDS

Well-known member
#2
Any of the old analogue crystal set radios you don’t bind, if the crystal in the TX is the same frequency as the one in the RX and it’s getting power, it’s ready to go.
 

FDS

Well-known member
#4
Yes, but you physically need a transistor “crystal” that plugs into the TX somewhere. It’s been years since I used one. If the TX and RX came together then they should match already. Get some power into it, most used 4AA batteries or equivalent, then see if it will move a servo.
 
#5
Yes, but you physically need a transistor “crystal” that plugs into the TX somewhere. It’s been years since I used one. If the TX and RX came together then they should match already. Get some power into it, most used 4AA batteries or equivalent, then see if it will move a servo.
i bought a kit from a guy, and there is like 10 receivers and 5 crystals, and i realy dont know any thing about this.
 
#6
i bought a kit from a guy, and there is like 10 receivers and 5 crystals, and i realy dont know any thing about this.
There should be a little flag on the crystal in both the TX and RX. it will have the channel and frequency on it, they have to match! (I NEVER thought I'd say that). You also can only use Futaba receivers with Futaba, Airtronics with Airtronics, etc. Hitec made receivers that were compatible with different brands, some could even select which brand based on the signal shift (negative for F, positive for about everybody else.) If you aren't sure what is going on find a club and look for the oldest members, they will remember how it all works. :)
 

FDS

Well-known member
#7
If the stickers are missing then trial and error will work, there’s not many frequencies to choose from with those things.
 
#8
If the stickers are missing then trial and error will work, there’s not many frequencies to choose from with those things.
Over the years we had about 68 air frequencies, 20 or so ground frequencies, and who knows in the 27, 50, and 53 mHz bands! Most of the older frequencies had crystals that were soldered in but not all of them.
 

Piotrsko

Well-known member
#9
27 mhz had 10, all on the CB channels, just Fyi 50 53 were ham bands so every 25kc or thereabouts in open bands. Weren't a lot of ham equipment flying.

Futaba has numbers on the crystals, wee tags that wear off. Transmitter crystals are different and usually had a black tag. There may still be numbers on the tags. Should be a tag somewhere on the transmitter saying what channel it's on, with a number like 72.430mhz which is channel 31. Unless the radio stuff is brown cased, it's probably FM. The recievers should say AM or FM. FIND loose crystal that matches the number on the transmitter plug it into the receiver bay. Shouldn't be able to change transmitter crystals, that went away around 1980 or so.

Pictures are helpful if you can post them.
 
#11
If I recall, with 72mhz, some Tx’s were divided into high band and some low band. You can change channels so long as you stayed within the high or low band. In other words, you can change from channel 21 to 30, but don’t try changing channel 21 to 57
Yes, Futaba did that with receivers. Hitec after market receivers didn't have that "feature" on them. Hitec also made some shift select receivers where you could flip a jumper to use the receiver with Futaba or everybody else (Airtronics, JR, Hitec).
 

quorneng

Well-known member
#12
Moeller
It does depend on exactly which model of Futaba PCM 1024z you have.
The base models have a single channel 'module' in the back. The module can be changed for other frequencies. Top range ones used a programmable frequency module that allowed you to set the transmitter, via its screen, to any channel from 11 to 60.
Whatever frequency (channel) the transmitter is set to the receiver has to match using the right crystal. There are 'synthesised' receivers that can be programmed to match the transmitter frequency.
User manuals are available to download from the internet.