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Solved Paper Peel...

#1
I just finished an FT Racer/Slinger and I'm have some problems with the paper wanting to peel at the control hinges. I did use a glue hinge and tape on the other side, but it didn't seem to help much. Also, the vertical stabilizer is a bit loose in my opinion. Does anyone know how I can fix these problems? Thanks.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#2
I have had excellent results with hot glue & packing tape. I would hot glue the paper back to the foam. Then use the glue hinge technique to spread glue on the hinge line. I use a hot covering iron to smear the glue. Cover the hinge with packing tape and run a covering iron down the hinge line to reactivate the glue with heat. You end up hot gluing the tape to the hinge. I've never had this hinge fail.
 

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
#3
I just finished an FT Racer/Slinger and I'm have some problems with the paper wanting to peel at the control hinges. I did use a glue hinge and tape on the other side, but it didn't seem to help much. Also, the vertical stabilizer is a bit loose in my opinion. Does anyone know how I can fix these problems? Thanks.
Regarding peeling, do you know about squeegeeing the edges?

For your tail, do you mean it's not glued securely? Or is it just too floppy for you?
 
#4
I did do the sqeegee on all of the hinges but didn't use enough glue I guess. As for the tail, I don't think it's the glue problem as just the foam is floppy. I don't know if that's normal or not. I guess I'm just used to production planes like my Timber that has a extremely tough build. Thanks.
 

SlingShot

Maneuvering With Purpose
#5
As for the tail, I don't think it's the glue problem as just the foam is floppy. I don't know if that's normal or not. I guess I'm just used to production planes like my Timber that has a extremely tough build. Thanks.
A single sheet of FB is not very rigid, but fine for that size plane. What you are seeing is probably normal.

You can make doublers for the base to stengthen it if you want. (More tail weight though) the Mid7night F-16 is using tail doublers.
 

Keno

Well-known member
#6
One thing you can do when do the hot glue hinge thing, is of course whip it off but press your hinging area to a flat surface when it is still hot this will help seal the foam to paper at the bottom of the cut.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#7
For a floppy tail you can cut a small channel and glue in a BBQ skewer spar, (but as mentioned it will add weight to the tail) In addition if using the white FB use minwax to seal the FB and it makes it a little less flexible. a layer of paint afterwards will add a little extra stiffness.
A while ago I had a similar flexibility issue on a biplane wing I was building so I coated the entire wing surface in white glue. When it dried it was so rigid that the wing outlasted the plane even though i must have crashed the plane more than 20 times! (Again it adds weight).

Lifting hinges! When sealing the hinge I use the white glue because it soaks into the paper at the hinge and glues it to the foam. If a hinge line separates I put a little white glue under the lifted paper and use a piece of paper to push the glue deep into the lifted area and then clamp or weight the FB hinge flat until the glue is dry.

Just what works for me!

Have fun!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#8
I have also had great results with 2 layers of foam in the tail. Keep the paper hinge in the middle of 2 layers of foam, greatly increased the strength.
 
#10
Ok, got all that figured out. But now I have a problem of the plane wanting to roll to the left at launch and seek out trees. I am using a slightly larger prop (10x4.5) and thought that maybe torque was the problem. Any suggestions?
 

Keno

Well-known member
#11
They will do that tork to the left. You might think about putting some right thrust in your motor mount, but on take off you need to use your rudder on tail draggers. Right rudder as it starts to turn left and ease it out as need until you are flying. It take a bit of practice but you'll get.
Edit: ? is this when you are flying? If so I would assume you are using all the right aileron you have>
 
#12
They will do that tork to the left. You might think about putting some right thrust in your motor mount, but on take off you need to use your rudder on tail draggers. Right rudder as it starts to turn left and ease it out as need until you are flying. It take a bit of practice but you'll get.
Edit: ? is this when you are flying? If so I would assume you are using all the right aileron you have>
I built the power pock like the FT vid said, and it only does it on take off. No other time what so ever. And I don't have gear on it. It's a left hand (weaker arm) launch. I wasn't sure if aileron was a good idea because at slow speed I thought they wouldn't have enough effect.
 

Keno

Well-known member
#13
I built the power pock like the FT vid said, and it only does it on take off. No other time what so ever. And I don't have gear on it. It's a left hand (weaker arm) launch. I wasn't sure if aileron was a good idea because at slow speed I thought they wouldn't have enough effect.
No problem with adding right thrust or in some case a touch more if needed. Maybe if I am hearing right you probably could use more throttle on launch. I would not hurt to put right aileron if needed gently. Keep it over high vegetation or soft grass and of course avoid tree they are hungry. Ah maybe some else could step in here, Hai-Lee he is great a explaining this better than self. Just have fun that's what its all about. One more thing you might check to make sure that everything is moving in right direction and not reversed. We have all made that mistake and there are gremlins.
 

Merv

Well-known member
#14
I wasn't sure if aileron was a good idea because at slow speed I thought they wouldn't have enough effect.
If you are worried about ineffective ailerons, you're going to slow. I agree with @Keno, you need more power. You're going to need a good stiff toss to be successful. Angle the plane upwards 20-30%. Have enough throttle that the plane wants to leave you hand on it's own.

I prefer to toss with my right hand, Tx in the left but no thumb on stick. I'm concerned that if I had a thumb on the stick, I could give it an unintentional input when I tossed the plane.
 
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#15
If you are worried about the ailerons, you may indeed be going to slow. You're going to need a good stiff toss to be successful. Angle the plane upwards 20-30%. Have enough throttle that the plane wants to leave you hand on it's own.
With the C pack, power is no problem at 2/3 throttle. Would a wingtip launch work better? And if I tossed it with my right arm, would it still climb with no finger on the stick (assuming I toss at 20-30 angle)?
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#16
Apart from using a bungee to get a very fast speed BEFORE you open the throttle there is a CHEAT but you NEED TO BE CAREFUL.

I tried to over power my first FT Spitfire a long time ago now and it did not have any landing gear so I had to give it a rather hefty throw. Even at half throttle it would turn and then roll/dive to the left on launch. I knew that it was due to "P" factor so in desperation I did a mix via a switch to deflect the rudder to turn right on launch.

It reduced the launch problem but I needed to be quick to switch it off as the speed rose or it would turn, roll, and dive to the right!

Eventually I settled for landing gear and as much rudder deflection as I could reasonably obtain. It still would want to turn left on the opening of the throttle and would crash immediately if I took off too soon/slow. So the rudder held it straight as the speed built up and once travelling quite fast on the ground I would let it rise off of the ground at its own pace. Besides it really amazed the locals when it lifted off at full throttle and I had enough pace to then point it skywards and do a vertical zoom climb before resuming normal flight.

A ground run trolley is another option. The trolley has tail wheel steering via its own servo which is connected in parallel with the rudder servo via a "Y" harness. The Trolley socket on the "Y" harness is fixed to the underside of the fuselage, (facing rearwards) and the plug on the servo in the trolley is sanded slightly so that the slightest pull on the servo lead disconnects it from the "Y" harness.

Just a few thoughts!

Have fun!