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Parkzone Sport Cub - Wrinkled Nose From crash (*Not laminated)

JoeFlyer3

New to Custom RC Builds
#1
Hello Flite Test community! This is my first post on the Flite Test forums!

I've known for a while about Flite Test, and I regularly watch their videos. But I was inclined to join the forums with a question that continuously the internet fails to answer.

So, my Parkzone Sport Cub recently met a rather abrupt interaction with the surface of the earth. The damage wasn't too extensive. Only minor dame to the wing, a bent prop, broken engine cowling, bent landing gear rod, and a dismounted flap servo (and ripped battery compartment velcro). Nothing that can't be fixed/replaced. While that's been taken care of, there is another situation that I think all of us foam flyers have experienced at one point or another after a crash: fuselage wrinkling. Being the nature of the crash, the wrinkling was not alarmingly significant. There doesn't seem to be critical damage to the airframe. While these wrinkles can be considered "battle scars", I have the desire to restore this sport cub to it's [near] original state of beauty.

So, I turned to the internet where I found some interesting (and startling) solutions to this problems. The most prevalent solutions that I have seen are 1.) boiling the foam :confused:, 2.) foam-ironing foam that is already laminated, and 3.) sanding down the wrinkled foam. Oh, and 4.) filling the wrinkles with some foam-filler.

Boiling the foam is out of the question. I seems to always leave a bubbly effect on the foam, and I'd rather not remove all of the electronics from the plane just to do this.

Sanding is also out of the question, due to the paint job of the plane that I can not recreate.

Filler isn't an option, either, because I don't feel like that "fixes" the wrinkles, and like I said, I can not recreate the paint job.

Ironing the foam seems like an interesting idea (RC aircraft iron). However, in EVERY video I've seen, the foam needs to be laminated or the iron needs proper protection.

Now, with ironing, I do not own a foam iron. Considering I only have one large plane that will ever need it (and hopefully then, it won't need it again), I don't think the iron is really worth the investment of money (and time).

So do you think a standard clothing iron, on low heat AND with the protection of a sock, along with the constant movement of the iron along the plane, is safe to "remove" some of these wrinkles? Or is a standard house iron a big no-no with foam. Like I said, I will put a sock in between the foam and iron.

Any other suggestions for SAFELY removing the wrinkles without doing a complete overhaul? Otherwise, I can live with them.

Thanks in advance!


Joe N.
 

ridepate

Junior Member
#3
Is it the S2 Joe?? I'm assuming it is because you said cowl.....You do know you can just buy a new fuse for as little as 43.00?? And that was just a quick Google search. I just don't see the merits in spending the time to repair it myself. You can get the window-decals also. It would then be good as new!
 

quorneng

Active member
#4
JoeFlyer3
It will depend on the type and size of the wrinkles but I am not sure they will respond well to ironing out.
The wrinkle is the result of some of the foam cells being deformed. The best you can hope is that the crushing has not actually split the cell so the heat of the iron will cause the trapped air to expand and reform the cell to something like is correct shape. It the wrinkle has actually split the cell wall then no amount of heat will restore it.
All you can do is to try it and see.
 

JoeFlyer3

New to Custom RC Builds
#5
+ridepate

Yes, the Sport Cub S2. I already have a replacement cowl on the way.

As for the wrinkles, they are not too deep... certainly not harsh enough to have split the cells, either. I mean, buying another fuselage was an option, but that also requires taking out all of the electronics, installing them in the new one, and applying new decals. It would have cost me $50+ for that ON TOP of the $40 I spent on repairs and spare parts. I'd rather every crash not cost me upwards of $100.

But, I suppose that is an option if I crash again (heck, by then I might need a new fuselage).

As for now, I don't mind the wrinkles too much. They show the S2's integrity as an RC plane (minus the landing gear rod... not a very good design). Also, it reminds me never to turn perpendicular to a crosswind gust (NOT the first time the same situation has caused crash with another plane). I remember telling myself not to turn perpendicular to the gusts, which were blowing periodically all day. Of course, when I do, I just so happen to have a new, heavier batter in the plane that may have slipped loose of the velcro. When the wind got me inverted (because I was still turning to the left), the battery may have fell loose as well, while still supply power to the plane. The possible change in COG combined with the wind was a recipe for disaster! Luckily, I got the plane to just the right pitch and roll (before impact) where only the landing gear, prop, and cowl took the brunt of it, and the rest of the plane fell partial victim to inertia!
 

PHugger

Church Meal Expert
#6
I haven't tried this myself, but hot water seems a lot safer than an iron or heat gun.
Maybe some gentle steam from an iron would also work.
I'd hate to do more damage trying to fix it.
Start gentle and go on from there.


Best regards,
PCH
 

jamboree1

Active member
#7
I always preferred steam from a tea kettle myself. As you can direct the steam to affected area. And yes it will raise those pesky lil surface bumps, I just flatten them down with a spoon while still hot. Will it be an as new finish, nope, nothing ever will be.
 

ridepate

Junior Member
#8
+ridepate

Yes, the Sport Cub S2. I already have a replacement cowl on the way.

As for the wrinkles, they are not too deep... certainly not harsh enough to have split the cells, either. I mean, buying another fuselage was an option, but that also requires taking out all of the electronics, installing them in the new one, and applying new decals. It would have cost me $50+ for that ON TOP of the $40 I spent on repairs and spare parts. I'd rather every crash not cost me upwards of $100.

But, I suppose that is an option if I crash again (heck, by then I might need a new fuselage).

As for now, I don't mind the wrinkles too much. They show the S2's integrity as an RC plane (minus the landing gear rod... not a very good design). Also, it reminds me never to turn perpendicular to a crosswind gust (NOT the first time the same situation has caused crash with another plane). I remember telling myself not to turn perpendicular to the gusts, which were blowing periodically all day. Of course, when I do, I just so happen to have a new, heavier batter in the plane that may have slipped loose of the velcro. When the wind got me inverted (because I was still turning to the left), the battery may have fell loose as well, while still supply power to the plane. The possible change in COG combined with the wind was a recipe for disaster! Luckily, I got the plane to just the right pitch and roll (before impact) where only the landing gear, prop, and cowl took the brunt of it, and the rest of the plane fell partial victim to inertia!


10-4 on that crash cost! And you're right the airplane is a great flier but the gear-struts are horrible. I'm working on a scale (ish)-set for mine. I also Hot-glued all the tail-feathers on plus the stock screws. Much stouter. After some flight-time and some harshish aerobatics, the horizontal-stab develops a lot of slop side to side. The holes in the fuse become ovaled-out, thus the slop.
 
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