• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

plane powered by a servo moter

ananas1301

Crazy flyer/crasher :D
#2
Most of the servo motors are brushed but that doesn´t make it much of a challenge. It just would be a micro plane in the size of what we know today as miniums or so. (of course with adding a gear to the motor)

There would be something flying and I don´t reaaaally see any difficulty in that. I would leave some more challenging and harder stuff the FT crew. Maybe someone of the forum activists can do that.

I don´t know actually but if you really wanna make it a challenge go for 2,5g servos!!!
That would be fun to watch :D
 

Non Action Man

Nose Landing Specialist
#5
If you want to make it harder, the then the servo must stay in original condition! No mods, no continuous rotation servos, just your regular garden varity.
 

nibnobsam

I like big leccy planes
Mentor
#7
Or some mechanism which converts the back and forth movement of the servo into rotational movement, like on a steam train.
 

ananas1301

Crazy flyer/crasher :D
#9
I do agree that this is a VERY smart idea but I think having an additional "converter" will firstly reduce the power that the porp would get in comparison of we just use a servo motor and also i can´t imagine this work at all without opening the servo up.
It seems impossible to me especially if you aren´t a manufacturer of "kinetic energy converter from back to forth to a rotation" mechanism which must be in a scale of under one cubic centimeter!!!
Well I don´t want to ruin all your dreams but I just try to be realistic
But nice thing to dream of :D:D:D
 

ananas1301

Crazy flyer/crasher :D
#14
I think the RC Hobby is actually older than 50 years :)
Yep it is. As I remember a post by our old age member I think, he said it is even older than 100years old.

I can´t find his post but Ill keep looking for it.

He basically said that it all started with rubber band driven propellers and then with normal fuel engines as electric motors weren´t efficient at that time and so on.
 

pgerts

Old age member
Mentor
#16
We just found an electric aeroplane model 100 years old in another thread - really surprising.
The Radio control of model planes might just be around 50 years, but very few people could imagine then that radio control could be this common.
 

ananas1301

Crazy flyer/crasher :D
#17
Found it :D

"RC was not 100 years ago ;-)
F1 Freeflight gliders and rubber motors were the thing and still are for those skilled people who really can build, trim and fly models. Some time later came the gas engines, then diesels an glow if I am right, but still without RC.
F2 Line Control was ruling when the IC engines became more available.
F3 Radio Control was very interesting with only one channel for rudder and a really big ground station with a tube as amplifier. The transistor was not invented until 1947 and equipment with transistors was not common until beginning of the sixties.
You will find special clubs for vintage flying models.
SAM is the natural name in the US http://www.antiquemodeler.org/
SAM is Society of Antique Modelers - i wonder if it is correct, is it Modelers or Models, or is it the same?
Most people active in the antique model flying are "seniors".

There was no need for HobbyKing back then as there was lots of model flying clubs normally had most needed materials in stock. Most countries had some model factories making kits of popular models.
Yes Nightflyer has a lot of RC history in his "shed". "

by Pgerts

After that post he also says the following:

"I AM SORRY for the false information i gave.

Found out a very nice model of the Bleriot with an electric motor - photo from 1910 - 101 years ago !
http://www.antiquemodeler.org/sam_new/memory_lane/the_wonderful_years/the_wonderful_years.pdf"
 

colorex

Rotor Riot!
Mentor
#18
Before his death
in1880 Alphonse Penaud had built a successful small rubber powered model. In May 1896 Langley flew
his powered model above the Potomac River and Edwin W. Smith had flown a rubber-powered model with
landing wheels in 1901.
Quoted from the link above.