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Pusher planes questions...

MrGravey

Senior Member
#1
I have not been flying long enough to understand some things. If someone can help me out here I could spend this thought processing on something more productive (I'm working on an "anti-rain dance").

1: Why can't you just reverse the direction on the motor and use normal props for a pusher? Seems like that would reverse the thrust in the same way a push prop does. I guess this works but I want someone else to tell me its ok before I throw something in the air like this and learn the hard way.

2: Why are all the prop-n-slot planes I see pushers? I can't see where this would matter too much. Maybe the pusher prop is better because it pushed into the plane instead of pulling away from it? Just for how easy it is to build and brace?

Thanks for your time. There will be many many more questions from me in the near future.
 
#2
1: Yeah, that's fine. I think most do reverse the direction of the motor and use normal props.
2: I think most prop in slot planes are pusher because the motor has weight and allows the balancing of the plane to be easier. Also wiring of the motor to the receiver and Battery is easier since you do not have to route the wire around the slot.
 

OutcastZeroOne

Fly, yes... Land, no
#4
1: Why can't you just reverse the direction on the motor and use normal props for a pusher? Seems like that would reverse the thrust in the same way a push prop does. I guess this works but I want someone else to tell me its ok before I throw something in the air like this and learn the hard way.
The propeller is designed to move air in one direction. If you look at a prop, most will have writing on them. That writing is ment to face in the direction of travel. So to simple revers the motors direction isnt enough, you must also flip the pro around so that it effetiantly moves the air.

2: Why are all the prop-n-slot planes I see pushers? I can't see where this would matter too much. Maybe the pusher prop is better because it pushed into the plane instead of pulling away from it? Just for how easy it is to build and brace?
If you look at how a lot of the prop in slot sets are done you will see that the motor is indeed ment to be placed at a strong point of the body and push into the body of the plane. It dose offer some structual benifits but there are also a few designs that use a tractor set up. Also since the motor sits so far back on the plane the battery must now be placed ahead of the motor to properlly balance the plane and allow it to fly. So haveing the motor work in a pusher set up also makes it very easy to run wires and balance the plane.
 
#6
I'm about to do my first two pushers and ran into a similar question. I get that the lettering needs to go forward, but my concern is that I want to use my Beef on a Versa conversion... it has a bolt on prop adapter (M6 size). I don't have a 4mm propsaver and would have to inside mount the engine even if I did. If I use a standard prop, but reverse the motor direction, it should push fine, but I'm concerned that the "nose" bolt will unscrew itself. Has anybody had that problem? I'd like to get in the air soon, weather permitting, and would prefer not to have to wait on an order of reverse direction props.
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#7
OO,

it will unscrew . . . eventually. It will work just fine if you tighten down on the nut to the point the prop won't twist on the shaft.

I've found on my multirotors that a nice prop strike will loosen one of these nuts, and it will work loose eventually, but it works just fine otherwise. Should do just as well on a pusher, but check it every day, and after every hard landing. .