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"Scale" Gee Bee R3 Scratch-build

#1
I have a thread ongoing on regroups but I decided to join these forums and post on here as I feel you guys here might get more enjoyment out of this build.

I hesitate to say that this is a scale build only because the Gee Bee R3 is a fictitious plane... But I hope for this to look like the real thing would have (if it were real).

Anyways, I'll start by just posting some pictures- It's pretty self-explanatory as far as the steps I have taken to get to this point in the build. However, if anyone would like for me to elaborate on the build/techniques I would be glad to do so.

FJ
 

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earthsciteach

Moderator
Moderator
#2
Welcome to the forum, flyjumper! Wow! You are quite a foam carver. What weight fiberglass cloth are you using and how many layers did you apply? Is that Minwax Polycrylic as the resin?

I've been using some really lightweight cloth (0.56 Oz/sq yd) with Minwax. I'm curious as to how Minwax would work with thicker cloth with the intent of having more structural, um, strength (fairings, cowlings and such).

Can't wait to see more progress on this!
 
#4
Welcome to the forum, flyjumper! Wow! You are quite a foam carver. What weight fiberglass cloth are you using and how many layers did you apply? Is that Minwax Polycrylic as the resin?

I've been using some really lightweight cloth (0.56 Oz/sq yd) with Minwax. I'm curious as to how Minwax would work with thicker cloth with the intent of having more structural, um, strength (fairings, cowlings and such).

Can't wait to see more progress on this!
I used two layers of .75oz cloth for the fuselage and one layer on the wing and stabs. I am using water-based polyurethane as resin. As far as structural strength, you're far better off just using an epoxy resin and some thicker cloth (2-5oz) as the wbpu does not give much strength. I haven't tried it with a thicker cloth than .75oz but I can only imagine that it would come out flimsy. I only use it for giving nice light-weight finishes to my models (although it does give some strength and rigidity).
 

Liemavick

Member
Mentor
#9
Teach, West systems is the brand the folks on the other side of the tracks use. It is high quality stuff, a bit overkill for what were doing. If your going for a final clear finish with no painting surfboard resin would work great, but without shipping your looking minimum $60 a quart (2 pints, A + B parts). Last price I paid for "boatyard" resin was wholesale @ $26.00 a gallon. If you don't know "Boat yard" resin is the cheapest resin you can find, its usually used for laying up parts of the boat that aren't going to be seen.
 

willsonman

Builder Extraordinare
Mentor
#11
I use "Fibre glast 2000" and its great stuff. A bit $$$ so I usually only use it for finishing. I've also tried the "Glaze Coat" with marginal success. Its not quite as hard but its easy to work with and has a 1:1 ratio. Curing time is 24hours rather than an hour. The big plus is its cheap.
 
#14
Thanks for the positive feedback guys.

I'm still slowly chipping away at the R3. I got the main body (fuse+stabs) prepped for paint and pretty much to the point where I want them regarding their surface. Now time for paint. Also got the wheel pants pretty much finished up, just need to mount them.

FJ
 

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#17
Got to the fun part now... It's taking a while to get the whole thing painted because I want to make sure the paint is fully cured before laying up masking tape on it. Just a start as of now, but it's looking pretty good so far.
Also got another canopy formed. Wasn't happy with the first one because the foam melted a bit on the plug when I was molding it so I thickened up the plug with another layer of fiberglass and this one came out a lot better.

FJ
 

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willsonman

Builder Extraordinare
Mentor
#19
Looking great. What I have found to make those canopy molds last longer is to give it a skim coat of bondo. sand it down smooth. It takes the heat better than a single layer of FG and it more rigid to make a more accurate mold.
 
#20
Looking great. What I have found to make those canopy molds last longer is to give it a skim coat of bondo. sand it down smooth. It takes the heat better than a single layer of FG and it more rigid to make a more accurate mold.
I've done the method you explained many times in the past with good results... I was just too lazy to do all of that sanding so I put on a layer of 5oz with epoxy resin instead and it turned out fine (and the mold is still intact).

Thanks for the feedback.

FJ