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Scratch Vapor, Needs Electronics

#1
So I've been looking at the E-Flite/Parkzone Vapors. I"m really wanting one because I live in the suburbs of SoCal and our backyard is pretty small. It's starting to be summer and I'm trying to find something I can fly around on calm nights while the rest of the fam are in the pool and the night vapor is looking pretty perfect for that.

And then I remembered I have a bit of foam board left over from some other builds I've done and thought "well why don't i just try to build a similar air frame"

so I did. Not to toot my own horn or anything but I think it came out pretty great for 30 minutes of cutting and gluing with no actual plans.
foam board wing about the same length as the vapor's. foam board tail surface. BBQ skewer frame, and some paper clips to mount the wing to the skewer to make it a high wing
Works pretty well as a glider, but it is a bit tail heavy, I had to use a penny and 3 quarters taped to the nose to balance it, and even then it could have maybe used another penny or two

Only problem now is electronics. I don't know a whole lot about those so I'm hoping someone out there in the community will be able to give some suggestions
Please keep in mind I'm going for as cheap as possible. I run an FrSky radio (i have a RX4R I don't mind scavenging from my Scout for the nice summer night flights) but I also have the spektrum MLP6DSM that comes with some of their RTF planes. I would also like to use the 1s e-flite batteries I have or the tinywhoop/newbeedrone packs if possible

any Ideas for micro brushed power systems (or brushless, maybe using the tiny whoop size motors?👀 ) and super tiny servos are greatly appreciated as well as lighting options

scratchVapor.jpg
 

PsyBorg

Wake up! Time to fly!
#2
What about them replacement "bricks" with the speed controller and micro servos built in.

Think they are used in the tiny parkzone planes maybe? I have seen threads here where people used them.

Anyway heres a bump for your thread. Hopefully it jogs someone elses memory with better information.
 

3800_T

New member
#3
You could use 2 tiny whoop motors, and have differential thrust to turn, and use throttle to go up and down to have absolutely no servos, and it would probably be very light
 
#4
What about them replacement "bricks" with the speed controller and micro servos built in.

Think they are used in the tiny parkzone planes maybe? I have seen threads here where people used them.

Anyway heres a bump for your thread. Hopefully it jogs someone elses memory with better information.
thanks! I was looking in to those, I'm hoping I can build without having to use one of those but they're definitely the plan B (and plan B is starting to look like the easiest 😂)
 
#5
You could use 2 tiny whoop motors, and have differential thrust to turn, and use throttle to go up and down to have absolutely no servos, and it would probably be very light
this is a very interesting idea, I might have to try this based purely out of curiosity
should I set my elevator with some tape to add the lift? or angle the motors up to to kind of pull it in an upwards direction?