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Setup on my Bat Bone...

#1
Hi guys!

I am about to start bilding my first tricopter, the Bat bone Tri!
What I understand from reading on many forums the experience comes from trial and error. For it is indeed a jungle with all components and what to consider for each individual component. I would like to share with you my setup so you are welcome comment on the various components..

Frame;
http://shop.flitetest.com/multirotors/bat-bone-tri-370-kit/


Engines;
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__6247__hexTronik_DT750_Brushless_Outrunner_750kv.html
Great motor for the money, as I understand it?

ESC;
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...ar_20_Amp_Multi_rotor_Brushless_ESC_2_4S.html
Recommended, really dont now anything about ESC..

Props;
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewitem.asp?idproduct=22450&aff=655899
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewitem.asp?idproduct=22451&aff=655899

Saw that it was someone else who asked the question regarding battery capacity what it is that limiting the size. Guess there's a limit how big vs the total weight(MTOW) on the Tri? But am I unrealistic if I try to squeeze in
3000mAh?
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__10299__Turnigy_3000mAh_4S_40C_Lipo_Pack.html
or 5000mAh?
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__10096__Turnigy_5000mAh_4S_35C_Lipo_Pack.html

Can also mention that the consensus is that this will be my test and knowledge platform to then mount the GoPro and FPV equipment and APM in a not so far future ...

Kind regards!:eek:
 
#2
11x4.7" Props on a 750 KV motor powered by a 4S battery is going to be way too much power for the FliteTest frame and mounts. I tried going with 10x4.5" props on my BatBone with 750 KV motors and a 4000mAh 4S battery, and it never did get good flight out of it. The torque from the big props cause the booms to warp or mounts to break. You're looking at at least 200 watts of power with your proposal; when the FT guys recommend 370 class motors, which are about 80 watts of power. Additionally the weight of a larger battery will break the lower plate of the BatBone body between the segments meant to run battery straps through. None of that accounts for that motor only being spec'd to run on a 3S and not a 4S battery.

Having learned a good lesson from a friend of mine, keep it simple and stick to the recipe when you're building your first multi-rotor. Focus on it being light, don't worry about big batteries, a GoPro, and FPV equipment. By being lighter it will also be more forgiving during crashes, which will happen a lot for the first few months of flying. Once you get good at line of sight flying, then you can think about building a second multi-rotor which will carry more weight and is sturdier as a result.

Use the Multirotor eClac to find a combination of motors, props, and batteries which will work within the limits of a 370 class motor setup (80 to 100 watts). Consider about 600-700 grams to be your all up weight on a BatBone Tri-copter with a 2200mAh 3S battery. Consider this NTM 1200KV Motor swinging a 8x4.5" prop; that should be about 90 watts of power per motor which is the power range FT recommends. These motors will be able to handle more power later on as well, by putting a 9x4.7" prop on there to give a little more lift to lug a gopro around (the extra weight is needed fot ballast though, so dont start with the 9" props) without going too far and overpowering the frame.

I know the temptation all too well of putting "big" motors with big props and make a lot of lift, but the reality is that the FT frame components are not up to handling a lot of power. They're meant to be lightweight, moderate power, and crash forgiving rigs to fly with.
 

DDSFlyer

Senior Member
#3
11x4.7" Props on a 750 KV motor powered by a 4S battery is going to be way too much power for the FliteTest frame and mounts. I tried going with 10x4.5" props on my BatBone with 750 KV motors and a 4000mAh 4S battery, and it never did get good flight out of it. The torque from the big props cause the booms to warp or mounts to break. You're looking at at least 200 watts of power with your proposal; when the FT guys recommend 370 class motors, which are about 80 watts of power. Additionally the weight of a larger battery will break the lower plate of the BatBone body between the segments meant to run battery straps through. None of that accounts for that motor only being spec'd to run on a 3S and not a 4S battery.

Having learned a good lesson from a friend of mine, keep it simple and stick to the recipe when you're building your first multi-rotor. Focus on it being light, don't worry about big batteries, a GoPro, and FPV equipment. By being lighter it will also be more forgiving during crashes, which will happen a lot for the first few months of flying. Once you get good at line of sight flying, then you can think about building a second multi-rotor which will carry more weight and is sturdier as a result.

Use the Multirotor eClac to find a combination of motors, props, and batteries which will work within the limits of a 370 class motor setup (80 to 100 watts). Consider about 600-700 grams to be your all up weight on a BatBone Tri-copter with a 2200mAh 3S battery. Consider this NTM 1200KV Motor swinging a 8x4.5" prop; that should be about 90 watts of power per motor which is the power range FT recommends. These motors will be able to handle more power later on as well, by putting a 9x4.7" prop on there to give a little more lift to lug a gopro around (the extra weight is needed fot ballast though, so dont start with the 9" props) without going too far and overpowering the frame.

I know the temptation all too well of putting "big" motors with big props and make a lot of lift, but the reality is that the FT frame components are not up to handling a lot of power. They're meant to be lightweight, moderate power, and crash forgiving rigs to fly with.
I think I just learned more from this post than in 3 months of trolling different forums...thanks mustang!
 
#4
I think I just learned more from this post than in 3 months of trolling different forums...thanks mustang!
You're welcome. I wish this was a lesson I learned at the on set of my adventures into multirotors.

I was warned a couple of times that I was picking motors that were "too big," but no one could tell me why they were "too big." So with that I threw caution into the wind and wanted my high power big prop setup to fly figuring I didn't have to use all of the available thrust while I was starting out. I had a hunch from the ecalc that the setup was going to hover at less than 35% throttle, but what I didn't realize is that leave very little stick movement and is pretty much a throttle on or throttle off scenario. And that was even with the 450 gram 4000mAh battery adding ballast for 1,100 grams of all up weight. The weight of the battery had already broken the bottom plate of the BatBone body in crashes and I hadn't even added more ballast yet to tame the available power I had. After three rebuilds and six weeks of ordering parts, after the initial build was complete, trying to get it to fly well it finally dawned on me what was meant by "too big" of a motor. I learned to read the "size" of a motor for the amount of power you are putting out in watts, not necessarily what the motor is capable of or its physical size. The setup I was running with was about 170 watts per motor, double the power recommended for 370 class motors.

I have a friend that built a AnyCopter Quad in the same time frame as I was working on mine. He went with 1400KV motors, swinging 8x4.5" props, with a 2200mAh 3S battery. While his setup is slightly on the warm side at 105 watts per motor, he needed the extra power for the altitude of where he lives at 6,500 feet above sea level. For all the time I have spent trying to get my BatBone flying, he has spent flying and fixing crash damage. He told me going into his project to follow the recipe for the first time, then tinker with the ingredients once you've mastered the basic formula. Lesson learned, mostly.

Even though I understand the limitations of the FT parts, I still had money and time invested in the powertrain parts I have laying around. Today I expect delivery of the Turnigy H.A.L. Quad frame from HobbyKing which is much heavier and is a bit more solid. I expect 1,600 grams of all up weight with this rig, but it should tame the 170 watts per motor I have sitting on my desk at home. I really hope this goes well and renews my confidence in multicopter building. I would like to revisit building a light weight BatBone Tricopter one day.
 
#5
11x4.7" Props on a 750 KV motor powered by a 4S battery is going to be way too much power for the FliteTest frame and mounts. I tried going with 10x4.5" props on my BatBone with 750 KV motors and a 4000mAh 4S battery, and it never did get good flight out of it. The torque from the big props cause the booms to warp or mounts to break. You're looking at at least 200 watts of power with your proposal; when the FT guys recommend 370 class motors, which are about 80 watts of power. Additionally the weight of a larger battery will break the lower plate of the BatBone body between the segments meant to run battery straps through. None of that accounts for that motor only being spec'd to run on a 3S and not a 4S battery.

Having learned a good lesson from a friend of mine, keep it simple and stick to the recipe when you're building your first multi-rotor. Focus on it being light, don't worry about big batteries, a GoPro, and FPV equipment. By being lighter it will also be more forgiving during crashes, which will happen a lot for the first few months of flying. Once you get good at line of sight flying, then you can think about building a second multi-rotor which will carry more weight and is sturdier as a result.

Use the Multirotor eClac to find a combination of motors, props, and batteries which will work within the limits of a 370 class motor setup (80 to 100 watts). Consider about 600-700 grams to be your all up weight on a BatBone Tri-copter with a 2200mAh 3S battery. Consider this NTM 1200KV Motor swinging a 8x4.5" prop; that should be about 90 watts of power per motor which is the power range FT recommends. These motors will be able to handle more power later on as well, by putting a 9x4.7" prop on there to give a little more lift to lug a gopro around (the extra weight is needed fot ballast though, so dont start with the 9" props) without going too far and overpowering the frame.

I know the temptation all too well of putting "big" motors with big props and make a lot of lift, but the reality is that the FT frame components are not up to handling a lot of power. They're meant to be lightweight, moderate power, and crash forgiving rigs to fly with.

I can not tell you how much I appreciate your reply!

Propps!
Do you have any recommendations(durable) when it comes to props from HK?

Engine
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/..._28_26A_1200kv_250w_short_shaft_version_.html

Esc
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...ar_20_Amp_Multi_rotor_Brushless_ESC_2_4S.html

Batt:
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__8932__Turnigy_2200mAh_3S_20C_Lipo_Pack.html
 
#6
wow- i fly my batbone with 2216-800kv motors(80g) and a 2600 4s lipo with 11x47 props daily. it flies like a dream. 12 inch arms. AUW is just under 1kg
ecalc is junk and never accurate-its more like a guesstimator.
DT750 is nowhere near "big"
heres a short video showing the batbone with dt750s tearing it up.
take it for what you want but this gentleman is giving incorrect info.
 
#7
I use 4 x Turnigy 2836/8 1100kv on my V-tail. They're rated at 336 watts per motor but thats probably on a 4S.

eCalc suggests I'm running at about 140 Watts per motor using a 3S battery. And 55 Watts per motor for hover with a total weight of 1300g with 9x4.5 and 8x4.5 props.