• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Simulator or not?

#21
Why make life difficult for yourself. The 22 in 1 cable is a well-known quantity. You can get it as cheap as $10. It works perfectly with your own transmitter, and best of all, you can fly all the Flitetest planes. Why would you want to look at anything else?
Can I run it on a MacBook Air?
 
#22
Skip the sim and build some foamboard planes. crash and learn on a few dollars if you've got the electronics. Try the bloody wonder. I learned ailerons on that plane. It builds quick, tough as nails and will fly on a variety of power systems.

I've never liked sims, to me it does not translate well.

I have a Mini guinea and a Mini Mustang but I would have to buy all the electronics. If I don't get a sim, which one should I build first? I have no experience with low wing or twin engine planes.
 

d8veh

Well-known member
#23
Can I run it on a MacBook Air?
Jeez, why do you guys get those daft things? They're so restrictive. At least with a PC you can have your operating system on a plug-in SSD, so you can swap between Linux and every version of Windows when you want.

Here's what I mean. This is my Win 10 SSD. I also have Windows XP for some old games, Win 8 because there used to be some Win 10 compatibility issues, which are probably sorted now, and Ubuntu Linux for internet and secure stuff. I just plug in whichever one I want before I switch on. That's also a good method if your kids use your PC. You can give them their own SSDs, so no chance of them messing up your PC.

Of course none of this works if you've got a Mac!

ssd.jpg
 
#24
Jeez, why do you guys get those daft things? They're so restrictive. At least with a PC you can have your operating system on a plug-in SSD, so you can swap between Linux and every version of Windows when you want.

Here's what I mean. This is my Win 10 SSD. I also have Windows XP for some old games, Win 8 because there used to be some Win 10 compatibility issues, which are probably sorted now, and Ubuntu Linux for internet and secure stuff. I just plug in whichever one I want before I switch on. That's also a good method if your kids use your PC. You can give them their own SSDs, so no chance of them messing up your PC.

Of course none of this works if you've got a Mac!

View attachment 121034
Well, I don't have a PC and I am not spending any money on one because I don't have a full time job. I am going to need a simulator that works on a Mac.
 

JTarmstr

Well-known member
#32
Once i wanted to play a videogame on my PC, but it only worked on android and apple, so i downloaded a android emulator to my PC so i could play it, would that be feasible for this? some sort of android or PC emulator?
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#36
MAC Simulator options:

Quads: AeroFly RC 7 (Available through the App Store) $39.99, also includes the ability to fly planes, but it's limited on the number of planes you can fly unless you purchase additional packs.
Liftoff - $19.99 through Steam, last I checked. This is my favorite; I put in over 40 hours of sim time before I jumped in and flew a real quad, on Acro, and it was just like the sim. Downside is that it does NOT have any planes, ONLY quads in it.

Those are the two that I've had the most experience with. I've been able to get AeroFly RC 7 to run on my 4 year old Mac Mini, wireless to my DX6 and my iX12, but the integrated Graphics card kinda dies at anything higher than the minimums. That said, it might run on a Macbook air, but you'd need to check it. The nice thing is that the new Mac App Store will tell you if it's compatible for your Mac or not, saving you from spending money to find out.
 

evranch

Active member
#37
I'll put in my two favorite free sims here again. Both are glider focused but have powered craft available.

- CRRCSim runs on anything (including a Mac) and has basic graphics but good flight models.
- Picasim runs on any Android platform and other than not having physical sticks, is a great sim. Good for a cheap tablet with a big screen. Edit: Picasim runs on Windows as well and runs well on Linux under Wine. You may be able to run it under Wine on Mac as well.

I'm always confused when people talk about 4ch being different because to me the fourth channel is rudder as it is optional on most builds. Build a 3ch bank and yank, then add rudder for coordinated turns. Just like real life, keep your feet off the pedals until you get the hang of the yoke.

However if you are going from a 3ch high wing, high dihedral trainer to a plane with ailerons you should definitely put in some sim time before you knife edge it into the ground. Key with ailerons is that you have to initiate the bank, perform the turn with mostly neutral stick, and then level the wings. 3 separate movements that need to be performed smoothly. Holding aileron input through a turn will result in a continuous roll.
 

makattack

Winter is coming
Moderator
Mentor
#39
The devo7 has a USB port right? I use my devo8s with a straight mini USB cable to the computer (both mac and PC) and with the deviationtx software, use it as USB joystick device to run both crrcsim and flight gear (an open source full scale flight sim)
 
#40
The devo7 has a USB port right? I use my devo8s with a straight mini USB cable to the computer (both mac and PC) and with the deviationtx software, use it as USB joystick device to run both crrcsim and flight gear (an open source full scale flight sim)
The devo 7 has a Trainer port.

Here are some pictures.
DSCN5818.jpg DSCN5819.jpg