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Help! Soldering problem

CrashRecovery

I'm a care bear...Really?
Mentor
#3
Well first you need to remove all that gunk on those pads and start fresh. Start by tinning the pads, that means add some solder onto the pads first before you try to connect the battery wires. Once you get a nice "puddle" on each pad move over to the wires. Start fresh there too. Trim off the ends you have now. Strip the insulation off and Tin the wire ends as well.
Now with a little solder on the tip of your iron, put the appropriate wire on the pad, then touch your iron to the wire and the solder should melt on the wire and on the pad. Once that happens pull your iron off and let the solder cool. Repeat those steps for the other pad and you should have your wires attached.
 

skymaster

Well-known member
#4
can the soldering iron be the problem, if it does not have enough heat to make the solder hot enough to get it to sitck. just a thought
 

CrashRecovery

I'm a care bear...Really?
Mentor
#5
Not sure but looking at that picture I'd start fresh on everything. Cut all the esc wires and resolder them with shorter exposed ends. Also trim the wires so that when the esc are secured to the motor arms the wires lay flat. So the wires will be trimmed so that one wire is longer then the middle one and the third wire is shorter than the middle one. The way they sit now there will be stress on the solder connection when the esc gets placed on the boom. When the OP goes to tin the wires he should lightly twist the wire
 

"Corpse"

Well-known member
#6
Also, when soldering battery connectors, you need to work on super high heat. You tin the pads and the power wires first, then you solder the connector to the board until they both become one joint. It helps if you have "Helping hands" (Little grabbers) to hold your wires. If you don't have enough solder in the joint just add some more and make sure it all is one smooth shiny surface.

Also, it's good not to leave long motor wires exposed like that, because in a crash they could touch and short out your board. I'd probably re-do those just to be safe. Good luck!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#7
I agree with the above.
With solder heat is everything, you absolutely need a temperature controlled soldering iron. Don't attempt this with a $10 soldering iron. With the smaller wires use 320C with the larger battery wires use 380C. Also use solder with lead, something around 60/40.
 

"Corpse"

Well-known member
#8
I agree with the above.
With solder heat is everything, you absolutely need a temperature controlled soldering iron. Don't attempt this with a $10 soldering iron. With the smaller wires use 320C with the larger battery wires use 380C. Also use solder with lead, something around 60/40.
I am able to solder fine without a digital soldering iron, but it does take more practice to gauge temperatures.