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swapables elecronic soldering

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#2
Depends on what and where you get your parts, but probably.


Most of the online sources will provide parts - - sometimes up to including heatshrink - - but will not solder because customers will usually want their matching connectors. You'll grow to appreciate this.


*Some* local hobby stores provide a soldering service - - buy our parts, and we'll install matching connctors.


You can skip the connectors and solder all the parts together, but that's generally a bad idea. Parts fail and you don't want to cut and resolder your wires just to replace a burned out motor.


Not quite positive that covers what you need to know - if you have a more specific question, feel free to ask.
 
#5
It looks like the battery has a connector, based on the picture. You will need to solder a matching connector to the battery side (two wires) of the ESC, and connectors to the motor side (three wires). The motor side will need to match the connectors on your motor if it came with them.
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#6
Also make sure the battery connection matches the red wire to the red wire, black to black. Very important and easy to overlook
 
#7
I purchased two of those batteries and they do come with a connector but it wasn't the connector I wanted to use so I had to snip it off carefully (DON'T CUT BOTH WIRES AT ONCE!!!) and solder on a new connector.

I ordered a similar ESC and they come without connectors so you'll need to solder your motor and battery connectors. Here is the video I followed.
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#9
mfei,

14 isn't to young to learn and it's a skill that will serve you well for the rest of your life. Just learn to respect the hot end, not fear it.

Get a soldering iron, some wire, solder and a damp spounge (to clean the tip), and cut and splice a few wires peices together. If you've got an older friend/teacher/parent who can show you how, get them to step you through it. Otherwise, there are plenty of how-to videos online, not to mention the two on flite test.
 

xuzme720

Dedicated foam bender
Mentor
#11
There are a lot of RTF planes that you can reuse the electronics in other planes later and are easy to fly. The Bixler comes to mind and comes in both kit (ARF) and RTF versions. The ARF would still need a few things to get it in the air and would probably need some soldering...

What kind of budget do you have to work with?
 
#12
There are a lot of RTF planes that you can reuse the electronics in other planes later and are easy to fly. The Bixler comes to mind and comes in both kit (ARF) and RTF versions. The ARF would still need a few things to get it in the air and would probably need some soldering...

What kind of budget do you have to work with?
I have a 100 dololar bugt
 
#13
is there anyway i can buy the swapplable electronics without soldering bc im only 14
At that age the air in my boy room was thick with soldering smoke... =) As Crafty says, find someone to show you the basic techniques, and you'll do just fine. It's a skill you'll have a lot of use of and the tools are cheap.
 
#16
If you don't mind building then go for a FT Flyer. Get some help with the soldering and/or bilding if you require. It's a blast and nearly indestructible. Cheap, too; you could get a good radio and charger for the money left. If you get a RTF, make sure it can take a beating or that spares are cheap and available. I'd say at least Bixler 2 is a bit too much for a beginner. If you crash it you could kill someone.