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The bumblebee

Turbojoe

Active member
#2
Looking forward to the flight report. I bought this kit probably two years ago. None of the ply part sheets were cut more than half way through so I just put it back in the box on the back shelf. I'm almost done with another project so I guess this one can at least get the kit cut out all the way. Maybe I'll run the sheets through the band saw to finish the cuts. I love the old Bees and really wanted to build this lookalike.

Joe
 

Joker 53150

Mmmmmmm, balsa.
Mentor
#3
Be very careful on your CoG! My dad built one a few years back and we found the balance to be much more critical than on “normal” planes.
 

Brett_N

Well-known member
#4
Thanks for the note joker - guessing per usual, nose heavy works better. On this one at least I can slide the battery all the way forward UNDER the motor.
 

Joker 53150

Mmmmmmm, balsa.
Mentor
#6
Got a suggested balance location?

Joe
Sorry, no. The plane was destroyed on the second attempt at flight. The way it was built it needed a lot of runway to build enough speed to take off. Adjusting the gear for a more positive angle of incidence at rest may have fixed that. It hit a curb right as it was lifting off and wasn’t deemed fixable.
 

Turbojoe

Active member
#7
Sorry to hear of its demise. I'm also concerned about weight. I may just use the kit as a template and replace the ply parts with balsa like I did with the Eaglet 50. That turned a great plane into an awesome plane!

Joe
 

Brett_N

Well-known member
#8
Weird - mine flies great. Takes off in about 15 feet (a little squirrly on hard surface, but takes off from grass just fine)

Super simple flier, but needs a lot of nose weight. I think I',m at 6 nickels taped on the bottom now, and could use 2 or 3 more as it wants to nose up above 50% power.
 

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