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Transmitter question

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#21
I didn't have any issues with the FlySky transmitters and receivers I started in the hobby with, but the lure of endlessly configurable OpenTX software drew me away! :D

But these days I'm getting very interested in what's going on with DeviationTX and Jumper hardware, especially as recent FrSky releases are showing a move towards a closed proprietary protocol in the radio chip that could lock other manufacturers out of building compatible hardware. Not sure the Jumper hardware is up to the reliability/redundancy design level I want yet, but they are focused on cross compatibility and the software sure is getting there quickly with the increased user and developer base!
Well just imagine if the groups like FT and RC Groups as well as the various national organisations got together and specified the features we require with a serious indication that anything that does not comply will be not only rejected but be labelled as sub-standard by us all! We would finally have a radio system, (multiprotocol), that the manufacturers would either support or risk going out of business!

What a dream!

Have fun!
 

FDS

Well-known member
#22
Never had a single signal problem off the T12, flying 3 different protocols across FT, BNF and quads.
If you could combine the power of OpenTX with the simplicity of set up from a Spektrum type closed system, in a multi protocol radio with a module bay free you would rule the world.
For me multi protocol is the only way forward, regardless of the operating system behind it, I am sick of manufacturers locking up their systems, providing sub standard receiver solutions and limiting the number of channels just to make me buy more radios. I would rather spend a week learning to set it up then be able to use any receiver I want than be locked into any manufacturer or brand.
The advantage of module based multi protocol is you can simply skip a manufacturers TX if you don’t like it but still use their receivers and if a new module radio comes out that you like then it will all still work with that radio once you make the models again. If it’s a new OpenTX radio then everything just moves across on an SD card.
 
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The Hangar

Well-known member
#23
Spektrum and Lemon yes, but i run nothing but Orange Rx's and they used to average about $6 a piece. unfortunately our little tiff with China has doubled that price so who knows what's gonna happen in the future.

as for the Tx's. yes the Turnigy/FlySky is a cheap entry level Tx but when compared to ANY Spektrum Tx it's kinda like going from a Kia to a Mercedes in refinement and quality. in car speak that "upgrade" would costs thousands, here we are talking about $100 at most. in my humble opinion well worth it if you can.

me :cool:
I agree with rockyboy. I use the orangerx receivers, and have had two go out on me, but I have had one spektrum go out on me too. I have the Dxe, dx6i, and dx6e. If you can do it, buy the dx6e - I see them on eBay sometimes for $100 - $150. Totally worth the money. I do like the simplicity of the dxe. However, it is a pain if you have to program it or switch models. The dx6i is good too. It has a really dark screen and you only have 10 models to save on it, and it is a pain to switch since sometimes there are gaps between models... If you are setting a transmitter for the next several years, I would really recommend the dx6e. Find a good deal on eBay and get one - you’ll be glad you did. I know I was!
 

Merv

Well-known member
#24
All brands of Rx's are subject to damage, almost always it will be the antenna(s). If you have a crash or hard landing where the antenna brought the Rx to a sudden stop, you have the potential for damage. After such an event, ALWAYS do a range check. If your range is suspect, CHECK the antenna(s). Look closely at the outer braid, where the antenna enters the case. If there is damage to the outer braid, it will KILL your range.

A damaged antenna can easily be repaired or replaced.
 

Piotrsko

Well-known member
#25
This reminds me of the KRAFT / Futaba wars 40 years ago until JR and Airtronics came along. Anyone wonder why most radio plugs are Airtronics variant?

For me, I run Futaba, but ONLY because that's what all my other equipment is and it all interconnects. If I have to buy new, it may be not futaba but it will be what I consider to best meet my needs. I don't have 11 flyable airplanes EVER, I don't like programming stuff to get it to work, I hate spending $100 dollars + for ANYTHING, and most new stuff is incompatible with all my old stuff which I like better.
My $0.02 YMMV
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#26
Some of the best advice I have heard on choosing transmitters is to see how they feel in your hands - cause no matter how neat it looks, if the tension on the sticks bugs the heck out of you and isn't adjustable, then you aren't going to be happy. If you don't have other flyers nearby or a local hobby store, try finding a flying event in your region and ask people there what they like about their transmitter. Guaranteed you'll get a lot of good info as well as an opportunity to see how a bunch of different models feel.
This right here was a HUGE reason I went with Spektrum over Taranis. The Taranis had a 3 way switch on the left side of the radio that felt INCREDIBLY awkward to flip. The Spektrum had a 3 way switch in nearly the same position, but it felt more comfortable to flip it, and I could actually feel the 3 different positions, where the Taranis felt like it was 2 positions - either I'd skip the middle position, or I'd hit it right and it would only go from one end to the middle and stay there. Other people I've met since I started in the hobby have absolutely loved it and have no problem, but for me, it was a no-go, ergonomically.

@The Hangar - I'd agree with the DX6e over the Dx6i - more models on it. Only disadvantages on it over the DX6 is that the Dx6 has voice alerts (it'll speak out your time left, saying, "One Minute remaining" or do a countdown from 10 to 1 when you're at that point on the battery life) versus using alarms to alert you, and the Dx6 uses diversity antennas, whereas the Dx6e does not, so you get a better signal connection from the transmitter to the receiver and less of a chance of failsafe. But, it's also more expensive than the Dx6e (the Dx6i will probably be cheaper, but it's discontinued, so most of the ones out there on the market are going to be used transmitters). Is that a bad thing? Not necessarily - these things are things YOU need to decide if you can live with. I personally really like the Spektrums because of their simplicity in setup, and that I don't generally have to switch out a receiver if I go buy a bind n' fly plane like the Apprentice or the Timber; however, that's what works for ME and what I want. I mean, I'd LOVE to build up a Gee Bee in balsa, but I'm having a heck of a time finding plans or a kit to do that with. I can, however, buy a Horizon Hobbies UMX version of it with their receiver built in, so, Spektrum it is! :) LOL
 

rockyboy

Skill Collector
Mentor
#27
This right here was a HUGE reason I went with Spektrum over Taranis. The Taranis had a 3 way switch on the left side of the radio that felt INCREDIBLY awkward to flip. The Spektrum had a 3 way switch in nearly the same position, but it felt more comfortable to flip it, and I could actually feel the 3 different positions, where the Taranis felt like it was 2 positions - either I'd skip the middle position, or I'd hit it right and it would only go from one end to the middle and stay there. Other people I've met since I started in the hobby have absolutely loved it and have no problem, but for me, it was a no-go, ergonomically.
Yeah, I didn't like that 3 position switch feeling either. So I replaced it with a two position spring loaded switch and changed the programming to match it. Then I added a 6 position rotary switch in a new hole and updated the software to recognize it too. And added a total audio cut-off switch so I could play with the transmitter late at night without waking up the family by accident! For a couple months, I think modifying my transmitter became my primary hobby and airplanes were just a way to test the changes! :ROFLMAO:

I mean, I'd LOVE to build up a Gee Bee in balsa, but I'm having a heck of a time finding plans or a kit to do that with.
Ohh - I can help on this! :D

Here are the two GeeBee Plans that I've had in my shopping cart for over a year now - one 32" and one 103"

https://www.ebay.com/itm/232164476674
https://www.ebay.com/itm/331871858024

Going to do one of them some day... but not this summer :D

I think the premier Gee Bee kit to look for is the one made by Adrian Page, but those went out of production years ago and the last one I saw on flea-bay sold for over $300
 
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Bricks

Well-known member
#28
Yeah, I didn't like that 3 position switch feeling either. So I replaced it with a two position spring loaded switch and changed the programming to match it. Then I added a 6 position rotary switch in a new hole and updated the software to recognize it too. And added a total audio cut-off switch so I could play with the transmitter late at night without waking up the family by accident! For a couple months, I think modifying my transmitter became my primary hobby and airplanes were just a way to test the changes! :ROFLMAO:


0
This is the true difference in systems if you like to tinker and spend time figuring systems out go Open Transmitter, it was not for me I like my Spektrum. Couple of minutes I can get my programing done and have a great customer support system to back up my purchase. Purchased a used Spektrum DX9 was having a problem with the scroll wheel sent it in they fixed that and replaced 2 switches they thought did not feel right only charge shipping both ways.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#29
This is the true difference in systems if you like to tinker and spend time figuring systems out go Open Transmitter, it was not for me I like my Spektrum. Couple of minutes I can get my programing done and have a great customer support system to back up my purchase. Purchased a used Spektrum DX9 was having a problem with the scroll wheel sent it in they fixed that and replaced 2 switches they thought did not feel right only charge shipping both ways.
THIS. :) I will sing the praises of certain products; I feel that sometimes, it's worth it to spend a little more to get customer support, a warranty where they fix things like they did for you without worry, and it's a simple setup. This really is that whole "Mac vs. PC" argument, in a way - the Mac guys just want simplicity, the PC guys seem to be the ones who want to tinker. The systems BOTH do the same basic functions, but each one has its proponents and detractors. I don't like the FlySky stuff because it FEELS cheap - It's like the radio doesn't feel like there's much to it, and so in the back of my mind I wonder if it really is a quality radio, even if it might very well be. I don't like the Taranis radios because of the ergonomics. These are subjective things, which may differ depending on who's holding the radio. :)

It all breaks down, at the end, to what suits you best - but I'm going to tell you why I think the more expensive radios are worth it, in my mind, because I feel like it's not always about price, but rather features. Otherwise, why would anyone buy a Lamborghini, Ferrari, Maserati, Rolls Royce, etc? :)
 

Piotrsko

Well-known member
#30
One buys a lambo (et all) for the promise of REPUTATION, percieved or otherwise, and it proves you are willing to swap money to aquire that panache which may or not be available in the product you purchased.

What needs to happen is a list of available hardware with specs and ratings like some of the other lists here on FT.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#31
One buys a lambo (et all) for the promise of REPUTATION, percieved or otherwise, and it proves you are willing to swap money to aquire that panache which may or not be available in the product you purchased.

What needs to happen is a list of available hardware with specs and ratings like some of the other lists here on FT.
That's your perception. You don't get the performance of a Lamborghini in a Ford Focus, despite them doing the same thing - transporting you from one location to another. :)

As for a list of transmitters, we actually have that:

https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/which-transmitter-you-should-buy.37966/

It's not 100% up to date, as there are always new models coming out, but it gives you an idea of what's out there. There's also the manufacturers which will give you specs, but ratings are, again, subjective. For example, I just saw the Jumper TS8G radio, and realized it's a smaller radio than that of the Spektrum DX models - ergonomically for me, that would feel like a kid's toy in my hands, and wouldn't be comfortable. But, for a 10 year old kid who's got smaller hands? It might be absolutely perfect! :)
 

Piotrsko

Well-known member
#32
But the reputation of the focus is much different: CHEAP econobox vs quasi supercar.

Btw thanks for the radio listing address. They do need to make it a sticky.
 

sprzout

Knower of useless information
Mentor
#33
But the reputation of the focus is much different: CHEAP econobox vs quasi supercar.

Btw thanks for the radio listing address. They do need to make it a sticky.
Ok, let me change it a bit so it's a little more palatable - You have the Ford Explorer and the Lincoln Navigator. Both are built on the same platform, but the Navigator is more expensive. Why? Because it has more features and creature comforts than the Ford Explorer. Same basic frame, but you get more with the Lincoln - things like heated seats throughout the vehicle, an upgraded audio system, navigation system, turbocharged engine, etc. that the Explorer doesn't have. The Explorer's cheaper because it doesn't have those bells and whistles, despite being the same frame and body style.

This is the same thing with the transmitters - they have the same functions, they may look a lot alike, but paying more can get you certain features that aren't available on the cheap models. That's what I'm getting at when I mention the more expensive radios - you may need certain features, or you want a higher quality, or a better fit for your hands. :)
 

FDS

Well-known member
#34
The bottom line is that with all things equal, so antennae diversity the same and power output the same ALL 2.4ghz systems should maintain adequate, safe connection to your RC plane well out and beyond the limit of your ability to see which way up/round it is flying LOS. Even a $50 radio will do that
Like with any consumer item some people prefer a different tactile experience.
 

Hai-Lee

Old and Bold RC PILOT
#35
The bottom line is that with all things equal, so antennae diversity the same and power output the same ALL 2.4ghz systems should maintain adequate, safe connection to your RC plane well out and beyond the limit of your ability to see which way up/round it is flying LOS. Even a $50 radio will do that
Like with any consumer item some people prefer a different tactile experience.
Antenna diversity is not to improve radio range as it is used in WiFi but rather to ensure that radio communications is better maintained between the aircraft and the ground whilst the aircraft, (and therefore the Rx antennas), are thrown around the sky at all possible positions of antenna orientation.

A simple vertical antenna system can provide communications to the horizon and beyond but cannot maintain communications at even short range in a few positions or antenna alignments which are all to easily attained! For terrestrial applications you really still only need a single antenna.

Have fun!