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Tricopter Frame: Anycopter or original David W. frame?

Joyride

Junior Member
#1
I'm beginning my first multipcopter build and have decided to do a tricopter.

I'm looking for opinions on using David's original tricopter frame, or should I go with the anycopter frame?

The biggest benefit I see to David's design over the Anycopter is the foldable front arms, for storage and, more importantly, for crashes. The Anycopter images I've seen have the front booms bolted in, so there's no give in a crash situation.

My challenge with David's design is that I haven't found where I can acquire the "glass fiber" (fiberglass?) sheets in order to fab the frame, and I haven't found somewhere selling them at the moment. I've been thinking about trying some thin (about 1/8") plywood I have in my garage as a substitute.

Any thoughts and opinions are welcome.

-Chris
 

Liemavick

Member
Mentor
#4
I'm beginning my first multipcopter build and have decided to do a tricopter.

I'm looking for opinions on using David's original tricopter frame, or should I go with the anycopter frame?

The biggest benefit I see to David's design over the Anycopter is the foldable front arms, for storage and, more importantly, for crashes. The Anycopter images I've seen have the front booms bolted in, so there's no give in a crash situation.

My challenge with David's design is that I haven't found where I can acquire the "glass fiber" (fiberglass?) sheets in order to fab the frame, and I haven't found somewhere selling them at the moment. I've been thinking about trying some thin (about 1/8") plywood I have in my garage as a substitute.

Any thoughts and opinions are welcome.

-Chris


For $20 you can buy Davids metal body frame at the Flite Test store, link at top of page.
 

Craftydan

Hostage Taker of Quads
Moderator
Mentor
#5
One possible source of fiberglass sheets is blank PCB board (he was probably using un-coated boards from a PCB source). They aren't sold by total thickness (just depth of the copper layer, and number of coated sides), but thickness is commonly spec'ed. Shopping around could get you the thickness you want.

Plus side for these, you could etch your favorite design and have it pop out in copper.

Minus side, you have a potential ground plane to short electronics on -- need to keep everything insulated.
 

Joyride

Junior Member
#6
Thanks for the feedback. I'll give the plywood a shot.

I found those plans online and wish I had a CNC machine to use their CNC templates. Guess I need to get a bigger garage.

I had checked on purchasing David's body through the FliteTest site but it's been consistently out of stock for a little while now.

Thanks again,
-Chris
 
#9
Send a email to support@Flitetest.com and inquire when they are getting more in stock :) Easier then trying to cut your own.
It should be pretty easy even with just a jigsaw, drill and sandpaper. Use a couple dots of superglue to fix two pieces of ply together, use double-sided tape to attach the paper cutout template. Make your cuts, drill your holes, sand the edges to make it neat, and use a razor blade to pop the pieces apart.

It's dead simple with a bandsaw, drill press and strip sander. I wouldn't try doing the fine cuts for the battery tray mount with a jigsaw, that really needs a bandsaw or scroll saw.
 

Cyberdactyl

Misfit Multirotor Monkey
#10
Yes, heck, even for carbon fiber. If you're willing to take the proper breathing precautions, and you have the proper (but simple) cutting tools, you can do any intricate pattern.